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FAQ-How to Understand and Compute the Backplane Capcity, Switching Capacity, and Interface Capacity of the Device

Publication Date:  2012-07-27 Views:  66 Downloads:  0
Issue Description

Q:
How to understand and compute the backplane capacity, switching capacity, and interface capacity of the device?

      
Alarm Information

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Handling Process

A:
1. Backplane capacity is the maximum processing capability of the backplane to carry out high-speed forwarding of data among service boards and switching boards. There is no fixed formula to compute the backplane capacity. It must be greater than the capacity sum of the boards in all the slots of the backplane.
For example:
1) The backplane of a single-chassis NE500E is 4T, and so the backplane capacity of the device with N cascaded chassis is N x 4T.
2) At present, the backplane capacity of the NE80E is 2T.
3)
At present, the backplane capacity of the NE40E is 2T.
2. The switching capacity of a device carries out high-speed forwarding in the local switching chip of data between the local device and other devices.
For example:
1) At present, the switching capacity of each SFU of the NE5000E is 640 Gbit/s. The NE5000E contains up to four SFUs. Therefore, the switching capacity of the NE5000E is 2.56 Tbit/s.
2)
At present, the switching capacity of each SFU of the NE80E is 160 Gbit/s. The NE80E contains up to four SFUs. Therefore, the switching capacity of the NE80E is 640 Gbit/s.
3) At present, the switching capacity of each SFU of the NE40E is 160 Gbit/s. The NE40E contains up to four SFUs. Therefore, the switching capacity of the NE40E is 640 Gbit/s.
3. Interface capacity refers to the maximum interface rates of all interfaces provide by a device to connect external devices. The interface capacity = the maximum interface rate x interface density. The maximum interface rate refers to the maximum rate of an interface. Interface density refers to the number of interfaces supported by the device.
For example:
1) At present, the maximum interface rate supported by the NE5000E is 10 Gbit/s and each LPU supports four 10G interfaces. The NE5000E contains 16 slots and thus can be installed with 16 LPUs each of which contains four 10G interfaces. So, the device supports 64 10G interfaces, that is, the interface density is 64. Therefore, the interface capacity is 640 Gbit/s.
2)
At present, the maximum interface rate supported by the NE80E is 10 Gbit/s and each LPU supports two 10G interfaces.
The NE80E contains 16 slots and thus can be installed with 16 LPUs each of which contains two 10G interfaces. So, the device supports 32 10G interfaces, that is, the interface density is 32. Therefore, the interface capacity is 320 Gbit/s.
3)
At present, the maximum interface rate supported by the NE40E is 10 Gbit/s and each LPU supports two 10G interfaces. The NE40E contains 8 slots and thus can be installed with 8 LPUs each of which contains two 10G interfaces. So, the device supports 16 10G interfaces, that is, the interface density is 16. Therefore, the interface capacity is 160 Gbit/s.

      
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