Failed to enable WPS in TE series

Publication Date:  2016-05-27 Views:  386 Downloads:  0
Issue Description

We have either a TE30/40/50 or TE60 and you cannot enable the WPS on it under WI-FI Hotspot section as per below:

This KB was made to understand why this is happening and how this issue could be solved.

Handling Process

We first need to understand that any WI FI network connection uses either AES or TKIP encryption protocol.

TKIP and AES are two different types of encryption that can be used by a Wi-Fi network. TKIP stands for “Temporal Key Integrity Protocol.” It was a stopgap encryption protocol introduced with WPA to replace the very-insecure WEP encryption at the time. TKIP is actually quite similar to WEP encryption. TKIP is no longer considered secure, and is now deprecated. In other words, you shouldn’t be using it.

AES stands for “Advanced Encryption Standard.” This was a more secure encryption protocol introduced with WPA2, which replaced the interim WPA standard. AES isn’t some creaky standard developed specifically for Wi-Fi networks; it’s a serious worldwide encryption standard that’s even been adopted by the US government.

WPA and WPA2 encryption standards can sometimes be confusing.

WPA uses TKIP encryption, WPA2 uses AES, but can also use TKIP for backward-compatability (so it would accept WPA connections).

In essence:
WPA = WPA with TKIP = PSK
WPA2 = WPA with AES = PSK2

When you set your endpoint to use WPA2, you usually have the option to use AES or TKIP. When your endpoint is set to "WPA2 with TKIP" it means that network devices that can use WPA2 will connect with WPA2, and network devices that can only use WPA will connect with WPA. The passphrase for both WPA and WPA2 will be the same.

This option allows users to easily transition from WPA to WPA2. To set your endpoint to use only WPA2, choose WPA2 with AES (do not use TKIP).

Root Cause
We first need to understand that any WI FI network connection uses either AES or TKIP encryption protocol.

TKIP and AES are two different types of encryption that can be used by a Wi-Fi network. TKIP stands for “Temporal Key Integrity Protocol.” It was a stopgap encryption protocol introduced with WPA to replace the very-insecure WEP encryption at the time. TKIP is actually quite similar to WEP encryption. TKIP is no longer considered secure, and is now deprecated. In other words, you shouldn’t be using it.

AES stands for “Advanced Encryption Standard.” This was a more secure encryption protocol introduced with WPA2, which replaced the interim WPA standard. AES isn’t some creaky standard developed specifically for Wi-Fi networks; it’s a serious worldwide encryption standard that’s even been adopted by the US government.

WPA and WPA2 encryption standards can sometimes be confusing.

WPA uses TKIP encryption, WPA2 uses AES, but can also use TKIP for backward-compatability (so it would accept WPA connections).

In essence:
WPA = WPA with TKIP = PSK
WPA2 = WPA with AES = PSK2

When you set your endpoint to use WPA2, you usually have the option to use AES or TKIP. When your endpoint is set to "WPA2 with TKIP" it means that network devices that can use WPA2 will connect with WPA2, and network devices that can only use WPA will connect with WPA. The passphrase for both WPA and WPA2 will be the same.

This option allows users to easily transition from WPA to WPA2. To set your endpoint to use only WPA2, choose WPA2 with AES (do not use TKIP).
Solution

As specified above, the only solution to the error "Failed to enable WPS" is as per below, setting up AES as the "Encryption mode" instead of TKIP (when using WPA2-PSK):

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