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CX11x, CX31x, CX710 (Earlier Than V6.03), and CX91x Series Switch Modules V100R001C10 Configuration Guide 13

The documents describe the configuration of various services supported by the CX11x&CX31x&CX91x series switch modules The description covers configuration examples and function configurations.
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Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Configuring Common Optical/Electrical Interface Attributes

Configuring Common Optical/Electrical Interface Attributes

Switching Interfaces to Layer 3 Mode

Context

Based on the hardware structure of interface cards, the interfaces on some devices can only function as Layer 2 or Layer 3 Ethernet interfaces, and some other interfaces have flexible modes. In Layer 2 mode, an interface can be used as a Layer 2 Ethernet interface; in Layer 3 mode, the interface can be used as a Layer 3 Ethernet interface.

By default, an Ethernet interface on the device works in Layer 2 mode. To enable the Layer 3 functions on the interface, run the undo portswitch command on the interface.

When several interfaces need to be switched between Layer 2 and Layer 3 modes, run the portswitch batch command in the system view to perform batch switching.

Procedure

  • Switching a single Ethernet interface to Layer 3 mode in the Ethernet interface view
    1. Run:

      system-view

      The system view is displayed.

    2. Run:

      interface interface-type interface-number

      The Ethernet interface view is displayed.

    3. Run:

      undo portswitch

      The interface is switched to Layer 3 mode.

      By default, an Ethernet interface is in Layer 2 mode.

      The mode switching function takes effect when the interface only has attribute configurations (for example, shutdown and description configurations). If the service configuration (for example, port link-type trunk configuration) exists on the interface, you must clear the service configuration before running this command.

      Like a VLAN, each interface switched to the Layer 3 mode will occupy the internal forwarding resource of the device. Therefore, only less than 4063 VLAN can be created on the device after the interfaces are switched to the Layer 3 mode.

      You can still configure switching between Layer 2 and Layer 3 modes on an interface when the device's internal forwarding resources exceed the specifications. However, an exception may occur during switching between Layer 2 and Layer 3 modes after the device restarts.

    4. Run:

      commit

      The configuration is committed.

  • Switching Ethernet interfaces to Layer 3 mode in batches in the system view
    1. Run:

      system-view

      The system view is displayed.

    2. Run:

      undo portswitch batch interface-type { interface-number1 [ to interface-number2 ] } &<1-10>

      The interfaces are batch switched to Layer 3 mode.

      By default, an Ethernet interface is in Layer 2 mode.

    3. Run:

      commit

      The configuration is committed.

Checking the Configuration

Run the display interface [ interface-type [ interface-number ] ] command in any view or the display this interface command in the interface view to check the current interface status. If the Switch Port field is displayed in the command output, the interface is a Layer 2 interface; if the Route Port field is displayed, the interface is a Layer 3 interface.

Configuring Auto-Negotiation

Context

There are a large number of devices with different transmission capabilities on networks. If the devices on the two ends of a link cannot negotiate a proper data transmission capability, they cannot communicate with each other. The auto-negotiation function allows interfaces on both ends of a link to select the same operating parameters by exchanging information. In this way, the transmission capabilities of the interfaces can reach the maximum supported by the two ends.

The duplex modes and rates of the interfaces on the two ends need to be negotiated. If the negotiation succeeds, the two interfaces work in the same duplex mode and at the same speed. In non-auto negotiation mode, the operating parameters must be set manually.

  • For the auto-negotiation function supported by Ethernet interfaces, see Attributes Supported by Ethernet Interfaces of CX11x&CX31x&CX710&CX91x Series Switch Modules.
  • The interfaces on both ends of a link must have the same negotiation mode.
  • Electrical interfaces on both ends of a link cannot negotiate to reduce the rate. For example, when interfaces on both ends are GE electrical interfaces but network cables support only 100 Mbit/s rate, the two interfaces cannot negotiate to a rate of 1000 Mbit/s rate and become Down.
  • The CX110, CX111, and CX915 do not support GE electrical modules. The CX31x and CX91x support GE electrical modules. After a GE electrical module is installed, the interface rate can be configured.

Procedure

  1. Run:

    system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run:

    interface interface-type interface-number

    The interface view is displayed.

  3. Configure the auto-negotiation function.

    • Run:
      negotiation disable

      The Ethernet interface is configured to work in non-auto negotiation mode.

    • Run:
      undo negotiation disable

      The Ethernet interface is configured to work in auto-negotiation mode.

    For the default auto-negotiation mode of an Ethernet interface, see Default Configuration.

  4. Run:

    commit

    The configuration is committed.

Checking the Configuration

Run the display interface [ interface-type [ interface-number ] ] command in any view or the display this interface command in the interface view to check the current interface status. For details, check the Negotiation field in the command output.

Configuring the Interface Speed

Context

You can configure the rates of GE electrical interfaces in non-auto negotiation mode.

  • For the interface speed supported by Ethernet interfaces, see Attributes Supported by Ethernet Interfaces of CX11x&CX31x&CX710&CX91x Series Switch Modules.

  • When you configure the Ethernet interface speed, ensure that the same interface speed is configured for the two ends.

  • The CX110, CX111, and CX915 do not support GE electrical modules. The CX31x and CX91x support GE electrical modules. After a GE electrical module is installed, the interface rate can be configured.

Procedure

You can perform the following operations to configure the GE electrical interfaces:

  1. Run:
    system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run:
    interface interface-type interface-number

    The Ethernet interface view is displayed.

  3. Run:
    negotiation disable

    The Ethernet interface is configured to work in non-auto negotiation mode.

  4. GE electrical interface

    Run:
    speed { 10 | 100 | 1000 }
    The rate of the GE electrical interface is configured.

    The CX110, CX111, and CX915 do not support GE electrical modules. The CX31x and CX91x support GE electrical modules. After a GE electrical module is installed, the interface rate can be configured.

  5. Run:
    commit

    The configuration is committed.

Checking the Configuration

Run the display interface [ interface-type [ interface-number ] ] command in any view or the display this interface command in the interface view to check the current interface status. For details, check the Speed field in the command output.

Configuring Flow Control

Context

Network congestion causes packet loss. Flow control is a method of avoiding packet loss. After flow control is configured, if network congestion occurs on the local device, the local device sends a message to the peer device, instructing the peer device to reduce the packet sending rate. After receiving the message, the peer device stops sending packets to the local device no matter whether its packet sending rate is high or low, which prevents congestion.

As shown in Figure 4-1, SwitchA communicates with SwitchC through SwitchB. The flow control function is implemented as follows:
  1. GE1/17/1 on SwitchA is connected to GE1/17/2 on SwitchB, and the auto-negotiation speed is 1000 Mbit/s. The interfaces send data packets to each other at the speed of 1000 Mbit/s.
  2. The outbound interface GE2/17/1 on SwitchB only provides a maximum transmission speed of 100 Mbit/s. When congestion occurs during packet forwarding, SwitchB caches the received packets. When the number of cached packets exceeds the forwarding capability of GE2/17/1, packet loss may occur.
  3. After flow control is configured on GE1/17/1 of SwitchA and GE1/17/2 of SwitchB, GE1/17/2 sends a Pause frame to GE1/17/1, instructing GE1/17/1 to stop sending packets. After receiving the Pause frame, GE1/17/1 stops sending packets to GE1/17/2 within the period specified in the Pause frame. If congestion still occurs, GE1/17/2 continues to send Pause frames to GE1/17/1.
  4. GE2/17/1 continues sending the cached data packets until congestion is eliminated.
  5. After congestion is eliminated, SwitchB no longer sends Pause frames to SwitchA. SwitchA then can continue to send data packets at the speed of 1000 Mbit/s.
Figure 4-1 Flow control

When the peer device does not support auto-negotiation, you can configure flow control on two ends of the link. When the devices on two ends of the link both support auto-negotiation, you can configure flow control auto-negotiation on the two ends. The local device then negotiates with the peer device to determine whether flow control is enabled based on the network congestion status.

For the flow control function supported by Ethernet interfaces, see Attributes Supported by Ethernet Interfaces of CX11x&CX31x&CX710&CX91x Series Switch Modules.

Flow control and flow control auto-negotiation cannot be configured concurrently.

Flow control and flow control auto-negotiation can take effect only when being configured on both ends of a link.

After being inserted with SFP-GE electrical modules, 10GE optical interfaces support flow control auto-negotiation.

The 40GE optical interfaces connected to high-speed cables support flow control and flow control auto-negotiation.

When the packet forwarding mode on the CX710 switch module 40GE converged switching plane is set to Cut Through, the CX710 switch module 40GE converged switching plane does not support flow control function. Before configuring flow control function, run the assign forward mode store-and-forward command to change the packet forwarding mode to store-and-forward.

Procedure

  • Configuring flow control
    1. Run:

      system-view

      The system view is displayed.

    2. Run:

      interface interface-type interface-number

      The interface view is displayed.

    3. Run:

      flow-control

      Flow control is configured.

      By default, flow control is not configured on an Ethernet interface.

    4. Run:

      commit

      The configuration is committed.

  • Configuring flow control auto-negotiation

    1. Run:

      system-view

      The system view is displayed.

    2. Run:

      interface interface-type interface-number

      The interface view is displayed.

    3. Run:

      undo negotiation disable

      The Ethernet interface is configured to work in auto-negotiation mode.

      If the interface by default works in auto-negotiation mode and the working mode cannot be modified, you do not need to perform this step.

    4. Run:

      flow-control negotiation

      The flow control auto-negotiation function is configured on the interface.

      By default, flow control auto-negotiation is not configured on the interface.

    5. Run:

      commit

      The configuration is committed.

Configuring the Delay in Reporting Physical Status Changes

Context

An Ethernet interface can be physically Up and Down. When the physical interface status changes, the system notifies the upper-layer protocol modules (such as routing and forwarding modules) to guide packet sending and receiving. The system also generates traps and logs to ask users whether to process the physical link.

The frequent interface status changes result in extra system costs. After you configure the delay in reporting interface status changes, the system will not sense the physical interface status switching within the delay. After the delay, the physical status changes are reported to the system if the physical status is not recovered.

Procedure

  1. Run:

    system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run:

    interface interface-type interface-number

    The interface view is displayed.

  3. Run:

    carrier { up-hold-time | down-hold-time } interval

    The delay in reporting interface status changes is configured.

    By default, the delay in reporting an Up event and that in reporting a Down event are both 0 ms.

    The delay in reporting status changes depends on the network connection status.
    • Configure the delay to a larger value.

      For example, the interface frequently switches between the Up and Down state within a short period, and the period is shorter than the IP route convergence time. In this case, the upper-layer protocol cannot sense the physical status changes. You must set a longer interval to prevent unnecessary route entry updates.

    • Configure the delay to a smaller value.

      For example, after the status of the interface on the master link group changes from physically Up to Down, the system must immediately instruct the upper-layer service forwarding protocol to send service packets from the standby interface on the backup link. You must set a shorter interval to ensure real-time service switchover.

  4. Run:

    commit

    The configuration is committed.

Configuring Link Flapping Protection

Context

Network flappings or link network faults result in frequent physical status changes of interfaces on the local device. This causes link flappings and frequent network topology changes, and affects user communication. For example, in a primary/standby link application, when the physical interface status frequently changes between the Up and Down states on the primary link, services are switched between the primary and standby links. This increases the device load and may result in service data loss.

To solve this problem, you can configure link flapping protection to disable the interface whose physical status frequently changes. When the interface is Down, the network topology will not frequently change. In the primary/standby link application, after you configure link flapping protection on an interface in the primary link, the system directly disables this interface if the physical interface status frequently changes. After the services are switched to the standby link, steady transmission can be maintained in the standby link. The link flapping protection function involves the following parameters:
  • Number of link flappings: One link flapping refers to one interface status switchover.
  • Link flapping interval: The system needs to collect statistics on the number of interface flappings within a certain period. The period refers to a link flapping interval.
If the number of link flappings reach the threshold within the link flapping interval, the system disables the interface and records its status as ERROR DOWN(link-flap) (indicating that the interface is Down because of link flappings.) By default, after link flapping protection is enabled, the interface becomes Down if the interface status changes five times within 10 seconds.

Procedure

  1. Run:

    system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run:

    port link-flap trigger error-down

    Link flapping protection is enabled on the interface.

    By default, link flapping protection is enabled on an interface.

  3. Run:

    interface interface-type interface-number

    The interface view is displayed.

  4. (Optional) Run:

    port link-flap  { interval interval-value threshold threshold-value | interval interval-value | threshold threshold-value }

    The number of link flappings and the link flapping interval are configured for the interface.

    By default, the number of link flappings is 5 and the link flapping interval is 10 seconds for an interface.

  5. Run:

    commit

    The configuration is committed.

Checking the Configuration

Run the display error-down recovery [ interface interface-type interface-number ] command in any view to check information about the interfaces in Error-down state.

Follow-up Procedure

The interface can be recovered from the Error-down state in either of the following ways:
  • Manual recovery: When there are a few interfaces in Error-down state and the interfaces must be forcibly enabled, you can run the shutdown and undo shutdown commands in the interface view, or run the restart command to restart the interface.
  • Automatic recovery: When there are many interfaces in Error-down state, one-by-one configuration on each interface may result in errors and a large amount of duplicated workload. To configure the interface to restore to the Up state automatically, run the error-down auto-recovery cause link-flap interval interval-value command in the system view to set a recovery delay. After the delay, the interface goes Up automatically.

Configuring an Interface to Transit to the CRC Error-Down State When the Number of Received Error Packets Exceeds the Threshold

Context

When an Ethernet interface receives excessive CRC error packets, faults such as packet loss occur. As the interface is still Up, services cannot be immediately switched to the standby link even if the standby link is configured for the interface. To ensure normal service running, you can configure the interface to transit to the Error-down state when the number of received error packets exceeds the threshold. When the threshold is exceeded, the system disables the interface and records its status as ERROR DOWN(crc-statistics). In this way, services can be switched to the standby link in real time.

Procedure

  1. Run:

    system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run:

    interface interface-type interface-number

    The interface view is displayed.

  3. Run:

    trap-threshold error-statistics threshold-value interval interval-value

    The alarm threshold of CRC error packets and the alarm interval are configured.

    By default, the alarm threshold of error packets is 3 and the alarm interval is 10 seconds.

  4. Run:

    port crc-statistics trigger error-down

    The interface is configured to transit to the error-down state when the number of received CRC-error packets exceeds the threshold.

    By default, an interface does not transit to the Error-down state when the number of received CRC-error packets exceeds the threshold.

  5. Run:

    commit

    The configuration is committed.

Checking the Configuration

Run the display error-down recovery [ interface interface-type interface-number ] command in any view to check information about the interfaces in Error-down state.

Follow-up Procedure

The interface can be recovered from the Error-down state in either of the following ways:
  • Manual recovery: When there are a few interfaces in Error-down state and the interfaces must be forcibly enabled, you can run the shutdown and undo shutdown commands in the interface view, or run the restart command to restart the interface.
  • Automatic recovery: When there are many interfaces in Error-down state, one-by-one configuration on each interface may result in errors and a large amount of duplicated workload. To configure the interface to restore to the Up state automatically, run the error-down auto-recovery cause crc-statistics interval interval-value command in the system view to set a recovery delay. After the delay, the interface goes Up automatically.

Configuring the IFG

Context

Inter-frame gap (IFG) is used to differentiate two data packets, as shown in Figure 4-2. You can configure the IFG to improve data packet forwarding efficiency.

The packet forwarding rate, also called throughput, refers to the data forwarding capability on an interface, in pps. The packet forwarding rate is calculated based on the number of 64-byte data packets in a certain period. The payload of the preamble and IFG affects the packet forwarding rate.

By default, the maximum IFG is 12 bytes. The default IFG is recommended. If you change the interface IFG to a smaller value, the receiving end may have no sufficient time to receive the next frame after receiving one data frame. The packets then cannot be processed in real time, which results in packet loss.

Figure 4-2 IFG

Procedure

  1. Run:

    system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run:

    interface interface-type interface-number

    The interface view is displayed.

  3. Run:

    ifg ifg-value

    The IFG is configured.

    By default, the IFG is 12 bytes.

  4. Run:

    commit

    The configuration is committed.

Configuring Traffic Statistics to Include the IFG and Preamble Statistics

Context

You can run the display interface command to check the running status and statistics of an interface. The Last 300 seconds input rate or Last 300 seconds output rate field in the command output indicates the traffic rate in the inbound or outbound direction of the interface within the latest 300 seconds.

  • If you want to obtain the total number of bytes passing through the interface within a certain period, configure traffic statistics to include IFG and preamble statistics. The total number includes the number of bytes in packets and the payload of the preamble and inter-frame gap (IFG). In this case, Interface traffic statistics rate = (Original packet length + IFG + Preamble) x Number of packets passing through the interface every second.
  • If you want to obtain the number of packet bytes passing through the interface within a certain period, configure traffic statistics to exclude IFG and preamble statistics. The number here excludes the payload of the preamble and IFG. In this case, Interface traffic statistics rate = Original packet length x Number of packets passing through the interface every second.

    The inter-frame gap has a fixed value of 12 bytes and the preamble has a fixed value of 8 or 20 bytes. To adjust the inter-frame gap, run the ifg command.

Procedure

  1. Run:

    system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run:

    interface interface-type interface-number

    The interface view is displayed.

  3. Run:

    set flow-statistics include-interframe

    Interface traffic statistics include the IFG and preamble statistics.

    By default, interface traffic statistics does not include the IFG and preamble statistics.

  4. Run:

    commit

    The configuration is committed.

Setting the Jumbo Frame Length Allowed on an Interface

Context

Ethernet frames longer than 1518 bytes and VLAN frames longer than 1522 bytes are called Jumbo frames.

When exchanging a large amount of data (for example, transmitting files), Ethernet interfaces may receive Jumbo frames whose length exceeds that of common packets. If the length of the received Jumbo frames exceeds the default data frame length that can be processed, the device directly discards the Jumbo frames. You can set the Jumbo frame length allowed on an interface.

After the Jumbo frame length allowed on an interface is adjusted, packet forwarding becomes flexible. If multiple common Ethernet frames are used to transmit a data packet, redundant information such as inter-packet gaps (IPGs) and headers is also transmitted. If Jumbo frames are used to transmit a data packet of the same length, there are fewer frames without unnecessary IPGs and headers to transmit, improving the bandwidth usage.

However, the Jumbo frame lengths allowed on interfaces cannot be all set to the maximum. During transmission of a packet, each device that the packet passes though needs to support forwarding of Jumbo frames; otherwise, the packet is discarded during forwarding.

Procedure

  1. Run:

    system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run:

    interface interface-type interface-number

    The Ethernet interface view is displayed.

  3. Run:

    jumboframe enable value

    The maximum frame length allowed on the interface is set.

    By default, the maximum frame length allowed by an Ethernet interface is 9216 bytes.

  4. Run:

    commit

    The configuration is committed.

Configuring the Outbound/Inbound Bandwidth Usage Alarm Threshold

Context

The bandwidth usage represents the load on a device. If the bandwidth usage exceeds the threshold, bandwidth on the device is not sufficient for services and needs expansion. For example, if the bandwidth usage exceeds 95%, an alarm is generated to indicate that bandwidth resources are used up. Services may be interrupted before system expansion. You can expand device capacity to prevent service interruption.

Procedure

  1. Run:

    system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run:

    interface interface-type interface-number

    The interface view is displayed.

  3. Run:

    trap-threshold { input-rate | output-rate } bandwidth-in-use [ resume-rate resume-threshold ]

    The alarm threshold for the inbound/outbound bandwidth usage is configured for the interface.

    By default, the alarm thresholds of the outbound and inbound bandwidth usage are both 90.

    If the difference between the bandwidth-in-use and resume-threshold values is too small, alarms may be frequently generated or cleared.

  4. Run:

    commit

    The configuration is committed.

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Updated: 2019-12-13

Document ID: EDOC1000041694

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