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Troubleshooting Guide

CloudEngine 16800, 12800, 12800E, 8800, 7800, 6800, and 5800 Series Switches

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Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
How Is Heat Dissipated from the CloudEngine Series Switches?

How Is Heat Dissipated from the CloudEngine Series Switches?

CE12804/CE12808/CE12812/CE12816/CE12804S/CE12808S

  • The CE12804/CE12808/CE12812/CE12816 chassis use the same heat dissipation mode. The CE12812 chassis is used as an example here.
  • The CE12804S/CE12808S chassis use the same heat dissipation mode. The CE12808S chassis is used as an example here.
  • If a CloudEngine 12800 chassis is not fully loaded with cards, cover vacant slots with filler panels to ensure efficient heat dissipation and EMC compliance.

Figure 22-26 shows the airflow for heat dissipation of SFUs and power modules in a CE12812 chassis.

  • Cold air flows into the chassis from the air intake between the LPU cage and power modules and reaches the bottom of the SFU cage. After cold air flows upwards through the SFU cage, it turns into hot air and is exhausted from the chassis by the fan modules above SFUs.
  • Cold air flows into the power modules from air holes on power module panels and is blown through the power module area by built-in fans of the power modules. Cold air then becomes hot air, passes through the backplane, and goes out of the chassis from air holes on the power distribution unit.
Figure 22-26 Airflow for heat dissipation of SFUs and power modules (side view)

Figure 22-27 shows the airflow for heat dissipation of MPUs, CMUs, and LPUs in a CE12812 chassis. Cold air flows into the chassis through air holes on these cards, and goes through the cards to dissipate the heat. After that, cold air turns into hot air, bypasses the backplane, and is finally exhausted from the chassis by the fan modules at two sides of the SFUs.

Figure 22-27 Airflow for heat dissipation of MPUs, CMUs, and LPUs (top view)

Figure 22-28 shows the airflow for heat dissipation of MPUs, SFUs, LPUs, and power modules in a CE12808S chassis.

  • Cold air flows into the chassis through air holes on panels of the MPUs, SFUs, LPUs, and goes through these cards to dissipate the heat. After that, cold air turns into hot air, goes through the backplane, and is finally exhausted from the chassis by the fan modules at the rear of the chassis.
  • Cold air flows into the power modules from air holes on power module panels and is blown through the power module area by built-in fans of the power modules. Cold air then becomes hot air, passes through the backplane, and goes out of the chassis from air holes on the power distribution unit.
Figure 22-28 Airflow for heat dissipation of MPUs, SFUs, LPUs, and power modules (side view)

CE12804E/CE12808E/CE12816E

  • The CE12804E has a heat dissipation mode different from other chassis.
  • The CE12808E/CE12816E chassis use the same heat dissipation mode. The CE12808E chassis is used as an example here.
  • If a CloudEngine 12800E chassis is not fully loaded with cards, cover vacant slots with filler panels to ensure efficient heat dissipation and EMC compliance.

The SFUs in the CE12804E chassis are cooled in the following way:

  1. Cold air flows into the chassis from the SFU air intake vents below the chassis header at the front of the chassis, and then arrives at the top of the SFUs.
  2. Cold air goes down through the SFU cage and becomes hot air, which is exhausted out of the chassis by the two fan modules at the bottom left and bottom right.

Figure 22-29 shows the airflow for heat dissipation of SFUs.

Figure 22-29 Airflow for heat dissipation of the SFUs (side view)

The MPUs and LPUs in the CE12804E chassis are cooled in the following way:

  1. Front panels of the MPUs and LPUs have air holes. Cold air flows from these air holes to the MPUs and LPUs.
  2. Cold air turns into hot air and goes through two sides of the SFUs in the middle. Finally, hot air is exhausted from the chassis by the fan modules at both sides of the SFU cage.

Figure 22-30 shows the airflow for heat dissipation of the MPUs and LPUs.

Figure 22-30 Airflow for heat dissipation of the MPUs and LPUs (top view)

Power modules in the CE12804E chassis use a front-to-back airflow design.

  1. There are air holes on power module panels. Cold air flows into the power modules from these holes and is exhausted from the power module area by fans of the power modules.
  2. Hot air is exhausted out of the chassis from the power module air exhaust area at the rear lower part of the chassis.

Figure 22-31 shows the airflow for heat dissipation of power modules.

Figure 22-31 Airflow for heat dissipation of the power modules (side view)

The SFUs in the CE12808E chassis are cooled in the following way:

  1. Cold air flows into the chassis from the SFU air intake vents below the chassis header at the front of the chassis, and then arrives at the top of the SFUs.
  2. Cold air goes down through the SFU cage and becomes hot air, which is exhausted out of the chassis by the three fan modules below the SFUs.

Figure 22-32 shows the airflow for heat dissipation of SFUs.

Figure 22-32 Airflow for heat dissipation of the SFUs (side view)

The MPUs and LPUs in the CE12808E chassis are cooled in the following way:

  1. Front panels of the MPUs and LPUs have air holes. Cold air flows from these air holes to the MPUs and LPUs.
  2. Cold air turns into hot air and goes through two sides of the backplane in the middle. Finally, hot air is exhausted from the chassis by the fan modules at both sides of the SFU cage.

Figure 22-33 shows the airflow for heat dissipation of the MPUs and LPUs.

Figure 22-33 Airflow for heat dissipation of the MPUs and LPUs (top view)

Power modules in the CE12808E chassis use a front-to-back airflow design.

  1. There are air holes on power module panels. Cold air flows into the power modules from these holes and is exhausted from the power module area by fans of the power modules.
  2. Hot air is exhausted out of the chassis from the power module air exhaust area at the rear lower part of the chassis.

Figure 22-34 shows the airflow for heat dissipation of power modules.

Figure 22-34 Airflow for heat dissipation of the power modules (side view)

CloudEngine 8800, 7800, 6800, and 5800

The CloudEngine 8800, 7800, 6800, and 5800 series switches are cooled through front-to-back or back-to-front airflow, depending on the airflow directions of the fan modules and power modules used in the chassis. Each fan module and power module has an airflow flag.

  • Front-to-back airflow: Power modules and fan modules with front-to-back airflow are identified by a or flag. Air flows into the chassis from the power supply side and is exhausted from the port side, as shown in Figure 22-35 (using a CE5800 chassis as an example).
  • Back-to-front airflow: Power modules and fan modules with back-to-front airflow are identified by a or flag. Air flows into the chassis from the port side and is exhausted from the power supply side, as shown in Figure 22-36 (using a CE5800 chassis as an example).
  • The CE5850EI and CE5810EI series switches support 1+1 redundancy of fan modules. A CE5850EI or CE5810EI switch can work normally with a single fan module, but the device reliability degrades in this case.
  • The CE5850HI, CE5855EI, CE5880EI, CE6800, and CE7800 switches have two power modules, each of which consists of two fans. The four fans in a switch work in 3+1 redundancy mode.
  • Power modules using forced air cooling and fan modules in a switch must have the same airflow direction. For example, power modules with back-to-front airflow must be used with fan modules with back-to-front airflow.

  • When a switch uses fanless 150 W AC power modules, it can use fan modules with either of the airflow directions based on the actual conditions.

Figure 22-35 Front-to-back airflow
Figure 22-36 Back-to-front airflow

Airflow of a switch cannot be changed through software, but you can determine the airflow by selecting specific power modules and fan modules.

  • Power modules with different airflow directions or power values cannot be used in the same switch.
  • Fan modules with different airflow directions cannot be used in the same switch.
  • An alarm will be generated if a switch does not use any power module and fan module combination listed in Table 22-17.

Table 22-17 lists the combinations of power modules and fan modules allowed by the CloudEngine 8800, 7800, 6800, and 5800 series switches.

Table 22-17 Allowed combinations of power modules and fan modules

Series

Fan Module Airflow

Power Module Airflow

Chassis Airflow

CE5800

Back-to-front airflow

N/A (no fans)

Back-to-front airflow

Front-to-back airflow

N/A (no fans)

Front-to-back airflow

Back-to-front airflow

Back-to-front airflow

Back-to-front airflow

Front-to-back airflow

Front-to-back airflow

Front-to-back airflow

CE6800

Back-to-front airflow

Back-to-front airflow

Back-to-front airflow

Front-to-back airflow

Front-to-back airflow

Front-to-back airflow

CE7800

Back-to-front airflow

Back-to-front airflow

Back-to-front airflow

Front-to-back airflow

Front-to-back airflow

Front-to-back airflow

CE8800

Back-to-front airflow

Back-to-front airflow

Back-to-front airflow

Front-to-back airflow

Front-to-back airflow

Front-to-back airflow

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Updated: 2020-01-07

Document ID: EDOC1000060766

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