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Huawei SAN Storage Host Connectivity Guide for SUSE

HUAWEI SAN Storage Host Connectivity Guide for SUSE Linux Servers
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Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Common Configuration Commands

Common Configuration Commands

Creating a Physical Volume

  1. Create primary and logical partitions.

    Run the fdisk –l command to scan for the mapped LUNs. Suppose that the identified LUN is displayed as disk sdb. Run the fdisk /dev/sdb command to partition sdb.

    [root@root ~]# fdisk /dev/sdb 
    Device contains neither a valid DOS partition table, nor Sun, SGI or OSF disklabel 
    Building a new DOS disklabel. Changes will remain in memory only, 
    until you decide to write them. After that, of course, the previous 
    content won't be recoverable. 
      
      
    The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 13054. 
    There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024, 
    and could in certain setups cause problems with: 
    1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO) 
    2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs 
     (e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK) 
    Warning: invalid flag 0x0000 of partition table 4 will be corrected by w(rite) 
      
    Command (m for help):

    Type n to create new partitions and type p to create the primary partition. Specify the primary partition number to 1. Keep the default value of first cylinder and specify a value to last cylinder.

    Command (m for help): N/A 
    Command action 
     e extended 
     p primary partition (1-4) 
    p 
    Partition number (1-4): 1 
    First cylinder (1-13054, default 1):  
    Using default value 1 
    Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (1-13054, default 13054): 200

    Type n to create new partitions and type e to create expansion partitions. Then type p to view partitions.

    Command (m for help): N/A 
    Command action 
     e extended 
     p primary partition (1-4) 
    e 
    Partition number (1-4): 4 
    First cylinder (201-13054, default 201):  
    Using default value 201 
    Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (201-13054, default 13054): 1000 
      
    Command (m for help): p 
      
    Disk /dev/sdb: 107.3 GB, 107374182400 bytes 
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 13054 cylinders 
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes 
      
     Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks Id  System 
    /dev/sdb1               1         200     1606468+  83  Linux 
    /dev/sdb4             201        1000     6426000    5  Extended

    Type n to create new partitions and type 1 to create logical partitions. Type p to view partitions and type w to save partitions and exit from partition creation.

    Command (m for help): N/A 
    Command action 
     l logical (5 or over) 
     p primary partition (1-4) 
    l 
    First cylinder (201-1000, default 201):  
    Using default value 201 
    Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (201-1000, default 1000): 400 
      
    Command (m for help): p 
      
    Disk /dev/sdb: 107.3 GB, 107374182400 bytes 
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 13054 cylinders 
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes 
      
     Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks Id  System 
    /dev/sdb1               1         200     1606468+  83  Linux 
    /dev/sdb4             201        1000     6426000    5  Extended 
    /dev/sdb5             201         400     1606468+  83  Linux 
     

  2. Create LVM partitions.

    Perform the following operation to convert partitions 5 and 6 of sdb to LVM partitions.

    Command (m for help): p 
      
    Disk /dev/sdb: 107.3 GB, 107374182400 bytes 
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 13054 cylinders 
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes 
      
     Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks Id  System 
    /dev/sdb1               1         200     1606468+  83  Linux 
    /dev/sdb4             201        1000     6426000    5  Extended 
    /dev/sdb5             201         400     1606468+  8e  Linux 
    /dev/sdb6             401         600     1606468+  83  Linux 
      
    Command (m for help): t 
    Partition number (1-6): 5 
    Hex code (type L to list codes): 8e 
    Changed system type of partition 6 to 8e (Linux LVM) 
      
    Command (m for help): t 
    Partition number (1-6): 6 
    Hex code (type L to list codes): 8e 
    Changed system type of partition 6 to 8e (Linux LVM) 
      
    Command (m for help): p 
      
    Disk /dev/sdb: 107.3 GB, 107374182400 bytes 
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 13054 cylinders 
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes 
      
     Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks Id  System 
    /dev/sdb1               1         200     1606468+  83  Linux 
    /dev/sdb4             201        1000     6426000    5  Extended 
    /dev/sdb5             201         400     1606468+  8e  Linux LVM 
    /dev/sdb6             401         600     1606468+  8e  Linux LVM

  3. Run the pvcreate command to create physical volumes.

    [root@root ~]# pvcreate /dev/sdb5 
      Physical volume "/dev/sdb5" successfully created 
    [root@root ~]# pvcreate /dev/sdb6 
      Physical volume "/dev/sdb6" successfully created

  4. Run the pvdisplay -v command to verify the physical volume creation.

    [root@root ~]# pvdisplay -v 
        Scanning for physical volume names 
        Wiping cache of LVM-capable devices 
      --- Physical volume --- 
      PV Name               /dev/sda2 
      VG Name               VolGroup00 
      PV Size               557.65 GB / not usable 21.17 MB 
      Allocatable           yes (but full) 
      PE Size (KByte)       32768 
      Total PE              17844 
      Free PE               0 
      Allocated PE          17844 
      PV UUID               KyucjQ-9zte-1Zyr-0sZ0-Xxzt-HVjZ-2vQp8B 
        
      "/dev/sdb5" is a new physical volume of "1.53 GB" 
      --- NEW Physical volume --- 
      PV Name               /dev/sdb5 
      VG Name                
      PV Size               1.53 GB 
      Allocatable           NO 
      PE Size (KByte)       0 
      Total PE              0 
      Free PE               0 
      Allocated PE        0 
      PV UUID               g60zN0-3sYn-qPbd-7y0M-dGfZ-hVs7-763Ywo 
        
      "/dev/sdb6" is a new physical volume of "1.53 GB" 
      --- NEW Physical volume --- 
      PV Name               /dev/sdb6 
      VG Name                
      PV Size               1.53 GB 
      Allocatable           NO 
      PE Size (KByte)       0 
      Total PE              0 
      Free PE               0 
      Allocated PE          0 
      PV UUID               5UhmY2-fS4p-gdCo-OOgZ-nOa9-AV3H-LkvrNc

Changing the Size of a Physical Volume

Run the pvresize command to change the size of a physical volume. The command syntax is as follows:

pvresize –setphysicalvolumesize capacity size (unit: m or g) device name

In the following example, the size of a physical volume is changed from 1.53 GB to 300 MB.

[root@root ~]# pvscan  
  PV /dev/sda2 VG VolGroup00      lvm2 [557.62 GB / 0    free] 
  PV /dev/sdb5                      lvm2 [1.53 GB] 
  PV /dev/sdb6                      lvm2 [1.53 GB] 
  Total: 3 [560.69 GB] / in use: 1 [557.62 GB] / in no VG: 2 [3.06 GB] 
 [root@root ~]# pvresize --setphysicalvolumesize 300 /dev/sdb5 
  Physical volume "/dev/sdb5" changed 
  1 physical volume(s) resized / 0 physical volume(s) not resized 
[root@root ~]# pvscan  
  PV /dev/sda2 VG VolGroup00      lvm2 [557.62 GB / 0    free] 
  PV /dev/sdb5                      lvm2 [300.00 MB] 
  PV /dev/sdb6                      lvm2 [1.53 GB] 
  Total: 3 [559.45 GB] / in use: 1 [557.62 GB] / in no VG: 2 [1.83 GB]

Creating a Volume Group

Run the vgcreate command to create a volume group.

[root@root ~]# vgcreate vg0 /dev/sdb5 /dev/sdb6 
  Volume group "vg0" successfully created

Expanding a Volume Group

Run the following command to expand a volume group:

vgextend vgname pvname

The following is an example:

[root@root ~]# vgdisplay -v /dev/vg0 
    Using volume group(s) on command line 
    Finding volume group "vg0" 
  --- Volume group --- 
  VG Name               vg0 
  System ID              
  Format                lvm2 
  Metadata Areas        2 
  Metadata Sequence No  1 
  VG Access             read/write 
  VG Status             resizable 
  MAX LV                0 
  Cur LV                0 
  Open LV               0 
  Max PV                0 
  Cur PV                2 
  Act PV                2 
  VG Size               1.82 GB 
  PE Size               4.00 MB 
  Total PE              466 
  Alloc PE / Size       0 / 0    
  Free  PE / Size       466 / 1.82 GB 
  VG UUID               ARkbdL-9ID6-5HCy-DSQG-Aj5z-dQap-9VkM5X 

  --- Physical volumes --- 
  PV Name             /dev/sdb5      
  PV UUID               g60zN0-3sYn-qPbd-7y0M-dGfZ-hVs7-763Ywo 
  PV Status             allocatable 
  Total PE / Free PE    74 / 74 

  PV Name               /dev/sdb6      
  PV UUID               5UhmY2-fS4p-gdCo-OOgZ-nOa9-AV3H-LkvrNc 
  PV Status             allocatable 
  Total PE / Free PE    392 / 392 
[root@root ~]# vgextend /dev/vg0 /dev/sdb7 
  Volume group "vg0" successfully extended 
[root@root ~]# vgdisplay -v /dev/vg0 
    Using volume group(s) on command line 
    Finding volume group "vg0" 
  --- Volume group --- 
  VG Name               vg0 
  System ID              
  Format                lvm2 
  Metadata Areas        3 
  Metadata Sequence No  2 
  VG Access             read/write 
  VG Status             resizable 
  MAX LV                0 
  Cur LV                0 
  Open LV               0 
  Max PV                0 
  Cur PV                3 
  Act PV                3 
  VG Size               3.35 GB 
  PE Size               4.00 MB 
  Total PE              858 
  Alloc PE / Size       0 / 0    
  Free  PE / Size       858 / 3.35 GB 
  VG UUID               ARkbdL-9ID6-5HCy-DSQG-Aj5z-dQap-9VkM5X 

  --- Physical volumes --- 
  PV Name               /dev/sdb5      
  PV UUID               g60zN0-3sYn-qPbd-7y0M-dGfZ-hVs7-763Ywo 
  PV Status             allocatable 
  Total PE / Free PE    74 / 74 

  PV Name               /dev/sdb6      
  PV UUID               5UhmY2-fS4p-gdCo-OOgZ-nOa9-AV3H-LkvrNc 
  PV Status             allocatable 
  Total PE / Free PE    392 / 392 

  PV Name               /dev/sdb7      
  PV UUID               iF5Att-fVIj-9dOy-5055-rJlq-pOrS-aW8g2P 
  PV Status             allocatable 
  Total PE / Free PE    392 / 392

In this example, volume group /dev/vg0 originally contains physical volume /dev/sdb5 and /dev/sdb6. After the command is run, /dev/sdb7 is added to this volume group.

Creating a Logical Volume

  1. Run the lvcreate command to create a logical volume. The following is an example:

    [root@root ~]# lvcreate -L 10m -n lv0 vg0 
      Rounding up size to full physical extent 12.00 MB 
      Logical volume "lv0" created

    The parameters in this output are described as follows:

    • -L: indicates the size of a logical volume, expressed in MB. The logical volume size is determined by the minimum size of a complete logical extent. By default, this parameter is 0. In this output, the value of this parameter is 10 and the size of a logical extent is 4 MB. The physical extent consists of three logical extents. Therefore, the physical extent is 12 MB.
    • -n: indicates the name of a logical volume.

  2. View and confirm that the information about the newly created logical volume is correct.

    [root@root ~]# vgdisplay -v vg0 
        Using volume group(s) on command line 
        Finding volume group "vg0" 
      --- Volume group --- 
      VG Name               vg0 
      System ID              
      Format                lvm2 
      Metadata Areas        3 
      Metadata Sequence No  3 
      VG Access             read/write 
      VG Status             resizable 
      MAX LV                0 
      Cur LV              1 
      Open LV               0 
      Max PV                0 
      Cur PV                3 
      Act PV                3 
      VG Size               3.35 GB 
      PE Size               4.00 MB 
      Total PE              858 
      Alloc PE / Size       3 / 12.00 MB 
      Free  PE / Size       855 / 3.34 GB 
      VG UUID               ARkbdL-9ID6-5HCy-DSQG-Aj5z-dQap-9VkM5X 
        
      --- Logical volume --- 
      LV Name                /dev/vg0/lv0 
      VG Name                vg0 
      LV UUID                H6uskM-6clf-NVh2-KMiO-1Gk2-0iBz-nXOav2 
      LV Write Access        read/write 
      LV Status              available 
      # open                 0 
      LV Size                12.00 MB 
      Current LE             3 
      Segments               1 
      Allocation             inherit 
      Read ahead sectors     auto 
      - currently set to     256 
      Block device           253:2 
        
      --- Physical volumes --- 
      PV Name               /dev/sdb5      
      PV UUID               g60zN0-3sYn-qPbd-7y0M-dGfZ-hVs7-763Ywo 
      PV Status             allocatable 
      Total PE / Free PE    74 / 74 
        
      PV Name               /dev/sdb6      
      PV UUID               5UhmY2-fS4p-gdCo-OOgZ-nOa9-AV3H-LkvrNc 
      PV Status             allocatable 
      Total PE / Free PE    392 / 389 
        
      PV Name               /dev/sdb7      
      PV UUID               iF5Att-fVIj-9dOy-5055-rJlq-pOrS-aW8g2P 
      PV Status             allocatable 
      Total PE / Free PE    392 / 392 
    [root@root ~]# lvdisplay -v /dev/vg0/lv0  
        Using logical volume(s) on command line 
      --- Logical volume --- 
      LV Name                /dev/vg0/lv0 
      VG Name                vg0 
      LV UUID                H6uskM-6clf-NVh2-KMiO-1Gk2-0iBz-nXOav2 
      LV Write Access        read/write 
      LV Status              available 
      # open                 0 
      LV Size                12.00 MB 
      Current LE             3 
      Segments               1 
      Allocation             inherit 
      Read ahead sectors     auto 
      - currently set to     256 
      Block device           253:2 

Creating a File System

  1. Run the mkfs.xx command to create a file system. The following is an example:

    [root@root ~]# mkfs.ext3 /dev/vg0/rlv0  
    mke2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006) 
    Filesystem label= 
    OS type: Operating system: Linux 
    Block size=1024 (log=0) 
    Fragment size=1024 (log=0) 
    3072 inodes, 12288 blocks 
    614 blocks (5.00%) reserved for the super user 
    First data block=1 
    Maximum filesystem blocks=12582912 
    2 block groups 
    8192 blocks per group, 8192 fragments per group 
    1536 inodes per group 
    Superblock backups stored on blocks:  
        8193 
      
    Writing inode tables: done                             
    Creating journal (1024 blocks): done 
    Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done 
      
    This filesystem will be automatically checked every 20 mounts or 
    180 days, whichever comes first.  Use tune2fs -c or -i to override.

  2. Create a mount point and mount the logical volume.

    [root@root ~]# mkdir /test/mnt1 
    [root@root ~]# mount /dev/vg0/lv0 /test/mnt1/

  3. Display the mounting information.

    [root@root ~]# df -l 
    Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on 
    /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 
                         548527904 3105828 517108888 1% / 
    /dev/sda1               101086     15667     80200  17% /boot 
    tmpfs                  8137904         0 8137904 0% /dev/shm 
    /dev/mapper/vg0-lv0  11895      1138     10143  11% /test/mnt1

    The output shows that the logical volume is mounted correctly and can be used for subsequent data read and write.

  4. (Optional) You can run the following command to unmount the logical volume:

    [root@root ~]# umount /dev/vg0/lv0  
    [root@root ~]# df -l 
    Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on 
    /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 
                         548527904 3105828 517108888 1% / 
    /dev/sda1               101086     15667     80200  17% /boot 
    tmpfs                  8137904         0 8137904 0% /dev/shm 

Expanding a Logical Volume

Run the lvextend command to expand a logical volume. The command syntax is as follows:

lvextend  -L +target capacity  logical volume path

The following is an example:

[root@root ~]# lvscan  
  ACTIVE            '/dev/vg0/lv0' [12.00 MB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00' [540.03 GB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01' [17.59 GB] inherit 
[root@root ~]# pvscan  
  PV /dev/sdb5 VG vg0          lvm2 [296.00 MB / 296.00 MB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb6 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.52 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb7 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.53 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sda2 VG VolGroup00 lvm2 [557.62 GB / 0    free] 
  Total: 4 [560.98 GB] / in use: 4 [560.98 GB] / in no VG: 0 [0 ] 
[root@root ~]# lvextend -L +100m /dev/vg0/lv0  
  Extending logical volume lv0 to 112.00 MB 
  Logical volume lv0 successfully resized 
[root@root ~]# lvscan  
  ACTIVE            '/dev/vg0/lv0' [112.00 MB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00' [540.03 GB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01' [17.59 GB] inherit 
[root@root ~]# pvscan  
  PV /dev/sdb5 VG vg0          lvm2 [296.00 MB / 296.00 MB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb6 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.42 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb7 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.53 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sda2 VG VolGroup00 lvm2 [557.62 GB / 0    free] 
  Total: 4 [560.98 GB] / in use: 4 [560.98 GB] / in no VG: 0 [0 ]

The output shows that the logical volume capacity is expanded.

Compressing a Logical Volume

Run the lvreduce command to compress a logical volume. The command syntax is as follows:

lvreduce  -L +target capacity  logical volume path

The following is an example:

[root@root ~]# lvscan  
  ACTIVE            '/dev/vg0/lv0' [112.00 MB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00' [540.03 GB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01' [17.59 GB] inherit 
[root@root ~]# pvscan  
  PV /dev/sdb5 VG vg0          lvm2 [296.00 MB / 296.00 MB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb6 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.42 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb7 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.53 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sda2 VG VolGroup00 lvm2 [557.62 GB / 0    free] 
  Total: 4 [560.98 GB] / in use: 4 [560.98 GB] / in no VG: 0 [0 ] 
[root@root ~]# lvreduce -L -100m /dev/vg0/lv0  
  WARNING: Reducing active logical volume to 12.00 MB 
  THIS MAY DESTROY YOUR DATA (filesystem etc.) 
Do you really want to reduce lv0? [y/n]: y 
  Reducing logical volume lv0 to 12.00 MB 
  Logical volume lv0 successfully resized 
[root@root ~]# lvscan  
  ACTIVE            '/dev/vg0/lv0' [12.00 MB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00' [540.03 GB] inherit 
  ACTIVE          '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01' [17.59 GB] inherit 
[root@root ~]# pvscan  
  PV /dev/sdb5 VG vg0          lvm2 [296.00 MB / 296.00 MB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb6 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.52 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb7 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.53 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sda2 VG VolGroup00 lvm2 [557.62 GB / 0    free] 
  Total: 4 [560.98 GB] / in use: 4 [560.98 GB] / in no VG: 0 [0 ]

The output shows that the logical volume capacity is compressed.

Activating a Volume Group

Run the following command to activate a volume group:

vgchange -a  y volume group name

The following is an example:

[root@root ~]# vgchange -a y /dev/vg0 
  1 logical volume(s) in volume group "vg0" now active

Deactivating a Volume Group

Run the following command to deactivate a volume group:

vgchange –a n y volume group name

The following is an example:

[root@root ~]# vgchange -a n /dev/vg0 
  0 logical volume(s) in volume group "vg0" now active

Exporting a Volume Group

A volume group needs to be imported or exported in clusters, data backup, or recovery.

Run the following command to export a volume group:

vgexport volume group name

The following is an example:

[root@root ~]# vgexport vg0 
  Volume group "vg0" successfully exported 
[root@root ~]# pvscan  
  PV /dev/sdb5    is in exported VG vg0 [296.00 MB / 296.00 MB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb6    is in exported VG vg0 [1.53 GB / 1.52 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb7    is in exported VG vg0 [1.53 GB / 1.53 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sda2 VG VolGroup00 lvm2 [557.62 GB / 0    free] 
  Total: 4 [560.98 GB] / in use: 4 [560.98 GB] / in no VG: 0 [0 ]

Importing a Volume Group

Run the following command to import a volume group:

vgimport volume group name 

The following is an example (importing a volume group on a local computer):

[root@root ~]# vgimport vg0 
  Volume group "vg0" successfully imported 
[root@root ~]# pvscan  
  PV /dev/sdb5 VG vg0          lvm2 [296.00 MB / 296.00 MB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb6 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.52 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sdb7 VG vg0          lvm2 [1.53 GB / 1.53 GB free] 
  PV /dev/sda2 VG VolGroup00 lvm2 [557.62 GB / 0    free] 
  Total: 4 [560.98 GB] / in use: 4 [560.98 GB] / in no VG: 0 [0 ]

Deleting a Logical Volume

Run the following command to delete a logical volume:

lvremove lvname

The following is an example:

[root@root ~]# lvscan  
  inactive          '/dev/vg0/lv0' [12.00 MB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00' [540.03 GB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01' [17.59 GB] inherit 
[root@root ~]# lvremove /dev/vg0/lv0 
  Logical volume "lv0" successfully removed 
[root@root ~]# lvscan  
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00' [540.03 GB] inherit 
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01' [17.59 GB] inherit

Deleting a Volume Group

Run the following command to delete a volume group:

vgremove vgname

Perform the following steps:

  1. Ensure that all logical volumes are deleted from the volume group.

    [root@root ~]# vgdisplay -v /dev/vg0 
        Using volume group(s) on command line 
        Finding volume group "vg0" 
      --- Volume group --- 
      VG Name               vg0 
      System ID              
      Format                lvm2 
      Metadata Areas        3 
      Metadata Sequence No  8 
      VG Access             read/write 
      VG Status             resizable 
      MAX LV                0 
      Cur LV                0 
      Open LV               0 
      Max PV                0 
      Cur PV                3 
      Act PV                3 
      VG Size               3.35 GB 
      PE Size               4.00 MB 
      Total PE              858 
      Alloc PE / Size       0 / 0    
      Free  PE / Size       858 / 3.35 GB 
      VG UUID               ARkbdL-9ID6-5HCy-DSQG-Aj5z-dQap-9VkM5X 
        
      --- Physical volumes --- 
      PV Name               /dev/sdb5      
      PV UUID               g60zN0-3sYn-qPbd-7y0M-dGfZ-hVs7-763Ywo 
      PV Status             allocatable 
      Total PE / Free PE    74 / 74 
        
      PV Name               /dev/sdb6      
      PV UUID               5UhmY2-fS4p-gdCo-OOgZ-nOa9-AV3H-LkvrNc 
      PV Status             allocatable 
      Total PE / Free PE    392 / 392 
      
      PV Name               /dev/sdb7      
      PV UUID               iF5Att-fVIj-9dOy-5055-rJlq-pOrS-aW8g2P 
      PV Status             allocatable 
      Total PE / Free PE    392 / 392

  2. Delete the volume group.

    [root@root ~]# vgremove /dev/vg0 
      Volume group "vg0" successfully removed 
    [root@root ~]# vgdisplay -v /dev/vg0 
        Using volume group(s) on command line 
        Finding volume group "vg0" 
        Wiping cache of LVM-capable devices 
      Volume group "vg0" not found

Deleting a Physical Volume

Run the following command to delete a physical volume:

Pvremove raw device name

The following is an example:

[root@root ~]# pvremove /dev/sdb5 
  Labels on physical volume "/dev/sdb5" successfully wiped 
[root@root ~]# pvremove /dev/sdb6 
  Labels on physical volume "/dev/sdb6" successfully wiped 
[root@root ~]# pvremove /dev/sdb7 
  Labels on physical volume "/dev/sdb7" successfully wiped

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Updated: 2019-05-16

Document ID: EDOC1000150158

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