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Administrator Guide

OceanStor 2800 V5 V500R007

This document is applicable to OceanStor 2800 V5. Routine maintenance activities are the most common activities for the storage device, including powering on or off the storage device, managing users, modifying basic parameters of the storage device, and managing hardware components. This document is intended for the system administrators who are responsible for carrying out routine maintenance activities, monitoring the storage device, and rectifying common device faults.
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Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Checking the Operating Environment of the Storage Device

Checking the Operating Environment of the Storage Device

Check that the operating environment under which the storage device works meets associated requirements to ensure stable running of the device.

Check Method

This section describes how to check the equipment room environment. Checking the equipment room helps the maintenance personnel know the environment conditions and detect potential environment risks to prevent device faults due to environment issues.

Storage devices require a reliable operating environment. Usually, they are installed in a dedicated equipment room with a dedicated air-conditioning system and a redundant power system. Table 4-1 lists the environment check items. For the check criteria, see Check Criteria.

Table 4-1 Environment check items

Item

Check Method

Temperature, humidity, and altitude

Read the thermometer, hygrometer, and barometer in the equipment room.

Vibration and shock

Hire a professional organization to measure the vibration and shock on the storage system when it is working or stored.

Particle contaminants

Hire a professional organization to monitor the particle contaminants in the equipment room.

Corrosive gas contaminants

Hire a professional organization to monitor the corrosive gas contaminants in the equipment room.

Internal rack environment

  • Verify that power cables (with strong electrical current) and service cables (with weak electrical current) are laid out on different sides of a rack. Verify that power cables and service cables are laid out orderly and arranged in a similar manner to cables on other racks.
  • Verify that labels are clearly marked and securely attached.
  • Verify that vacant slots are covered with filler panels.
  • Verify that one end of each power cable is fully plugged into an external power socket and the other end into a storage device socket.
  • Verify that signal cables are fully plugged into appropriate device ports.
  • Verify that one end of each ground cable is secured by a ground clip and the other end is fastened to a rack ground terminal.
  • Verify that two groups of power cables are available for redundancy.
  • Verify that one end of each network cable or optical fiber is fully plugged into a storage device's front-end port and the other end into an application server port or a switch port.
  • Verify that one end of each management network cable is fully plugged into a storage device management network port and the other end is connected to the network where the maintenance terminal resides.
Troubleshooting
  • If the measured temperature or humidity falls outside the normal range, tune the air conditioners in the equipment room until the temperature or humidity falls within the normal range.
  • If the power supply system fails to meet the standard, append dedicated power lines and a power transformer with sufficient capacity.

Check Criteria

This section describes the criteria for checking the storage system's operating environment.

Temperature, Humidity, and Altitude

Temperature, humidity, and altitude requirements must be met so that storage systems can correctly work or be properly preserved.

Table 4-2 lists the temperature, humidity, and altitude requirements of the storage systems.

Table 4-2 Temperature, humidity, and altitude requirements of storage system

Parameter

Condition

Requirement

Temperature

Operating temperature

  • 5°C to 40°C (41°F to 104°F) when the altitude is between -60 m and +1800 m (-196.85 ft. and +5905.51 ft.)
  • At altitudes between 1800 m and 3000 m (5905.51 ft. and 9842.52 ft.), the temperature drops by 1°C (1.8°F) for 220 m (721.78 ft.) of altitude increase.

Temperature variation in the operating environment

1°C (1.8°F)/min

Non-operating ambient temperature

-40°C to +70°C (-40°F to +158°F)

Storage temperature (during transportation and storage with packages)

-40°C to +70°C (-40°F to +158°F)

Humidity

Operating humidity

10% RHa to 90% RH

Non-operating ambient humidity

5% RH to 95% RH

Maximum humidity variation

10%/h

Storage humidity (during transportation and storage with packages)

5% RH to 95% RH

Altitude

Operating altitude of disks

  • HDDs: -304.8 m to +3048 m (-1000 ft. to +10000 ft.)
  • SSDs: -305 m to +3048 m (-1000.66 ft. to +10000 ft.)

Non-operating altitude of disks

  • HDDs: -305 m to +12192 m (-1000.66 ft. to +40000 ft.)
  • SSDs: -305 m to +12192 m (-1000.66 ft. to +40000 ft.)

a: relative humidity (RH)

Vibration and Shock

Vibration and shock requirements must be met so that storage systems can correctly work or be properly preserved.

Table 4-3 shows the vibration and shock requirements of storage systems.

Table 4-3 Vibration and shock requirements of storage systems

Parameter

Requirement

Operating vibration

5 to 350 Hz, PSD: 0.0002 g2/Hz, 350 to 500 Hz, -3 dB, 0.3 Grms, 3 axes, 15min/axis

Non-operating vibration

10 to 500 Hz, 1.49 Grms, 3 axes, 15 min/axis

PSD:

  • 10 HZ@0.1g2/HZ
  • 20 HZ@0.1g2/HZ
  • 50 HZ@0.004g2/HZ
  • 100 HZ@0.001g2/HZ
  • 500 HZ@0.001g2/HZ

Non-operating shock

Half sine, 70 Gs/2 ms, 1 shock/face, total 6 faces

Particle Contaminants

Particle contaminants and other negative environmental factors (such as abnormal temperature and relative humidity) may expose IT equipment to a higher risk of corrosive failure. This section specifies the limitation on particle contaminants with the aim at avoiding such risks.

The concentration level of particle contaminants in a data center should meet the requirements listed in the white paper entitled Gaseous and Particulate Contamination Guidelines for Data Centers published in 2011 by American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Technical Committee (TC) 9.9.

ASHRAE, affiliated to International Organization for Standardization (ISO), is an international organization operated for the exclusive purpose of advancing the arts and sciences of heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC & R). The Gaseous and Particulate Contamination Guidelines for Data Centers is widely accepted, which is prepared by the members of ASHRAE TC 9.9, AMD, Cisco, Cray, Dell, EMC, Hitachi, HP, IBM, Intel, Seagate, SGI, and Sun.

According to the Guidelines, particle contaminants in a data center shall reach the cleanliness of ISO 14664-1 Class 8:

  • Each cubic meter contains not more than 3,520,000 particles that are greater than or equal to 0.5 μm.
  • Each cubic meter contains not more than 832,000 particles that are greater than or equal to 1 μm.
  • Each cubic meter contains not more than 29,300 particles that are greater than or equal to 5 μm.

It is recommended that you use an effective filter to process air flowing into the data center as well as a filtering system to periodically clean the air already in the data center.

ISO 14644-1, Cleanrooms and Associated Controlled Environments - Part 1: Classification of Air Cleanliness, is the primary global standard on air cleanliness classification. Table 4-4 gives the air cleanliness classification by particle concentration.

Table 4-4 Air cleanliness classification by particle concentration of ISO 14664-1

ISO Class

Maximum Allowable Concentrations (Particles/m3) for Particles Equal To and Greater Than the Considered Sizes Shown Below

-

≥ 0.1 μm

≥ 0.2 μm

≥ 0.3 μm

≥ 0.5 μm

≥ 1 μm

≥ 5 μm

Class 1

10

2

-

-

-

-

Class 2

100

24

10

4

-

-

Class 3

10,00

237

102

35

8

-

Class 4

10,000

2,370

1,020

352

83

-

Class 5

100,000

23,700

10,200

3,520

832

29

Class 6

1,000,000

237,000

102,000

35,200

8,320

293

Class 7

-

-

-

352,000

83,200

2,930

Class 8

-

-

-

3,520,000

832,000

29,300

Class 9

-

-

-

-

8,320,000

293,000

Corrosive Airborne Contaminants

Corrosive airborne contaminants and other negative environmental factors (such as abnormal temperature and relative humidity) may expose IT equipment to higher risks of corrosive failure. This article specifies the limitation on corrosive airborne contaminants with an aim at avoiding such risks.

Table 4-5 lists common corrosive airborne contaminants and their sources.

Table 4-5 Common corrosive airborne contaminants and their sources

Symbol

Sources

H2S

Geothermal emissions, microbiological activities, fossil fuel processing, wood rot, sewage treatment

SO2, SO3

Coal combustion, petroleum products, automobile emissions, ore smelting, sulfuric acid manufacture

S

Foundries, sulfur manufacture, volcanoes

HF

Fertilizer manufacture, aluminum manufacture, ceramics manufacture, steel manufacture, electronics device manufacture

NOX

Automobile emissions, fossil fuel combustion, chemical industry

NH3

Microbiological activities, sewage, fertilizer manufacture, geothermal emissions, refrigeration equipment

C

Incomplete combustion (aerosol constituent), foundry

CO

Combustion, automobile emissions, microbiological activities, tree rot

Cl2, ClO2

Chlorine manufacture, aluminum manufacture, zinc manufacture, refuse decomposition

HCl

Automobile emissions, combustion, forest fire, oceanic processes, polymer combustion

HBr, HI

Automobile emissions

O3

Atmospheric photochemical processes mainly involving nitrogen oxides and oxygenated hydrocarbons

CNHN

Automobile emissions, animal waste, sewage, tree rot

The concentration level of corrosive airborne contaminants in a data center should meet the requirements listed in the white paper entitled Gaseous and Particulate Contamination Guidelines for Data Centers published in 2011 by ASHRAE TC 9.9.

According to the Guidelines, corrosive airborne contaminants in a data center should meet the following requirements:

  • Copper corrosion rate

    Less than 300 Å/month, severity level G1 per ANSI/ISA-71.04-1985

  • Silver corrosion rate

    Less than 200 Å/month

NOTE:

Å, or angstrom, is a unit of length. One Å is equal to 1/10,000,000,000 meter.

According to ANSI/ISA-71.04-1985 Environmental Conditions for Process Measurement and Control Systems: Airborne Contaminants, the gaseous corrosivity levels are G1 (mild), G2 (moderate), G3 (harsh), and GX (severe), as described in Table 4-6.

Table 4-6 Gaseous corrosivity levels per ANSI/ISA-71.04-1985

Severity Level

Copper Reactivity Level

Description

G1 (mild)

300 Å/month

An environment sufficiently well-controlled such that corrosion is not a factor in determining equipment reliability.

G2 (moderate)

300 Å/month to 1000 Å/month

An environment in which the effects of corrosion are measurable and may be a factor in determining equipment reliability.

G3 (harsh)

1000 Å/month to 2000 Å/month

An environment in which there is high probability that corrosion will occur.

GX (severe)

> 2000 Å/month

An environment in which only specially designed and packaged equipment would be expected to survive.

See Table 4-7 for the copper and silver corrosion rate requirements.

Table 4-7 Concentration limitation of corrosive airborne contaminants in a data center

Group

Gas

Unit

Concentration

Group A

H2S

ppba

< 3

SO2

ppb

< 10

Cl2

ppb

< 1

NO2

ppb

< 50

Group B

HF

ppb

< 1

NH3

ppb

< 500

O3

ppb

< 2

a: Part per billion (ppb) is the number of units of mass of a contaminant per billion units of total mass.

Group A and group B are common gas groups in a data center. The concentration limits of Group A or group B that correspond to copper reactivity level G1 are calculated based on the premise that relative humidity in the data center is lower than 50% and that the gases in the group interact with each other. A 10% of increase in the relative humidity will heighten the gaseous corrosivity level by 1.

Corrosion is not determined by a single factor, but by comprehensive environmental factors such as temperature, relative humidity, corrosive airborne contaminants, and ventilation. Any of the environmental factors may affect the gaseous corrosivity level. Therefore, the concentration limitation values specified in the previous table are for reference only.

Checking Racks

Properly installed racks of the storage device help ensure the stable and long-term running of the storage device. Check rack conditions periodically to reduce device failure possibilities.

Impact on the System

The storage device imposes demanding requirements on rack conditions. An improperly installed rack impairs the proper running of the storage device.

Tools and Materials

Ensure that the tools and materials for checking rack conditions are available. The required tools include binding straps, an electroprobe, and a multimeter.

Reference Standard

Table 4-8 lists the items and standards for checking rack conditions.

Table 4-8 Rack condition check items and standards

Check Item

Standard

General layout of cables

Power cables (with strong electrical current) and service cables (with weak electrical current) are laid on different sides of a rack.

Layout of power cables

Power cables are laid out orderly and arranged in a similar manner to power cables on other racks.

Layout of service cables

Service cables are laid out orderly and arranged in a similar manner to service cables on other racks.

Cable labeling

Labels are clearly marked and securely attached.

Empty slot

Empty slots are covered with filler panels for proper heat dissipation and a neat appearance.

Power cable plug

One end of each power cable is fully plugged into an external power socket and the other end into a storage device socket.

Signal cable plug

Signal cables are fully plugged into appropriate device ports.

Ground cable

One end of each ground cable is secured by a ground clip and the other end is fastened to a rack ground terminal.

Power cable

Two groups of power cables are available for redundancy.

Front-end port connection

  • For Ethernet front-end ports, one end of each network cable is fully plugged into a storage device's front-end port and the other end into an application server port or a switch port.
  • For Fibre Channel or FCoE front-end ports, one end of each optical fiber is fully plugged into a storage device's front-end port and the other end into an application server port or a switch port.

Management network port connection

One end of each management network cable is fully plugged into a storage device management network port and the other end is connected to the network where the maintenance terminal resides.

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Updated: 2019-07-11

Document ID: EDOC1000181576

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