No relevant resource is found in the selected language.

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Read our privacy policy>Search

Reminder

To have a better experience, please upgrade your IE browser.

upgrade

Configuration Guide - DCN and Server Management

CloudEngine 8800, 7800, 6800, and 5800 V200R003C00

This document describes the configurations of Trill, FCoE, DCB, and NLB Server Cluster Association.
Rate and give feedback:
Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
TRILL Multi-Homing Active-Active Access

TRILL Multi-Homing Active-Active Access

Background

On a Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) network, access devices (such as switches and servers) are often dual-homed to TRILL devices to enhance reliability. When one TRILL device fails, services are not interrupted.

In this scenario, if you associate the VLAN appointed forwarder (AF) or MSTP with TRILL to eliminate loops, servers must connect to the TRILL network through Layer 2 access switches. This access mode also requires link redundancy backup, wasting bandwidth. You can use TRILL multi-homing active-active access to enable servers with dual NICs to be directly dual-homed to a TRILL network and forward traffic simultaneously. This access mode ensures reliability and fully utilizes network bandwidth.

Figure 1-15 TRILL multi-homing active-active access networking

As shown in Figure 1-15, CEs are dual homed to a TRILL network. Access-side M-LAG is deployed to ensure device- and link-level reliability. Two dual-homed PEs (RBs on the TRILL network) use the same pseudo nickname. In this way, the peer end considers the PEs a logical device on the TRILL network.

Working Mechanism of Access-Side M-LAG

For details on working mechanism of access-side M-LAG, see Working Mechanism of M-LAG.

Working Mechanism of Network-Side TRILL

In a TRILL multi-homing active-active access solution, two RBs obtain pseudo nicknames through manual configuration or automatic negotiation and finally obtain the same pseudo nickname. RB1 and RB2 encapsulate actual nicknames into packets on non-active-active interfaces and encapsulate pseudo nicknames into packets on active-active interfaces.

In addition, RB1 and RB2 check whether their pseudo nicknames are the same. If not, the E-Trunk on the two RBs does not take effect. If so, the two RBs exchange their actual nicknames and MAC addresses. When the peer-link or one RB becomes faulty, TRILL notifies the fault to the other RB in a timely manner to make the active-active solution ineffective.

Figure 1-16 TRILL multi-homing active-active access networking
As shown in Figure 1-16, a peer-link is deployed between RB1 and RB2, and the two RBs have the same pseudo nickname. CE-2 together with RB1 and RB2 can implement a TRILL multi-homing active-active access solution. TRILL processes traffic of different types and from different directions differently. The following describes how TRILL processes these traffic types.
  • Unicast traffic from a non-active-active interface, for example, CE-1
    Figure 1-17 Unicast traffic from a non-active-active interface

    RB1 forwards the traffic in a unicast manner.

  • Unicast traffic from an active-active interface

    Figure 1-18 Unicast traffic from an active-active interface

    RB1 and RB2 work in load balancing mode to forward the traffic together.

    NOTE:

    and represent different data flows.

  • Multicast traffic from a non-active-active interface, for example, CE-1

    Figure 1-19 Multicast traffic from a non-active-active interface

    RB1 encapsulates the actual nickname into the received multicast traffic and then forwards the traffic to each next-hop device. When the traffic arrives at RB2, RB2 forwards the traffic only to CE-3 but not to CE-2 or the TRILL network side according to the unidirectional isolation mechanism.

  • Multicast traffic from an active-active interface

    Figure 1-20 Multicast traffic from an active-active interface

    Multicast traffic from CE-2 is load balanced between RB1 and RB2. The following uses the forwarding process on RB1 as an example.

    RB1 encapsulates the pseudo nickname into the received multicast traffic and then forwards the traffic to each next-hop device. When the traffic arrives at RB2, RB2 forwards the traffic only to CE-3 but not to CE-2 or the TRILL network side according to the unidirectional isolation mechanism.

  • Unicast traffic from the TRILL network side

    Figure 1-21 Multicast traffic from an active-active interface

    If the unicast traffic is sent to an active-active interface, traffic is load balanced between RB1 and RB2 and then forwarded to the device that is dual-homed to the two RBs because the traffic is encapsulated with a pseudo nickname.

    The following uses the traffic sent to CE-1 as an example. Because the traffic is encapsulated with the actual nickname, the traffic is directly sent to RB1 without being load balanced and then from RB1 to CE-1.

  • Multicast traffic from the TRILL network side

    Figure 1-22 Multicast traffic from the TRILL network side

    According to the TRILL multicast forwarding principles, each RB joins a different multicast tree. Therefore, only one RB (RB1 or RB2) processes the multicast traffic.

    The following uses RB1 as an example. RB1 decapsulates the traffic and then forwards the traffic to each user-side interface. Because the peer-link is isolated from the backup interface, traffic arriving at RB2 is not forwarded to CE-2, avoiding routing loops.

Translation
Download
Updated: 2019-05-08

Document ID: EDOC1100004349

Views: 30536

Downloads: 120

Average rating:
This Document Applies to these Products
Related Documents
Related Version
Share
Previous Next