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OSN 500 550 580 V100R008C50 Alarms and Performance Events Reference 02

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Alarm Correlation

Alarm Correlation

When faults or exceptions occur on a network, a series of alarms are generated. Certain alarms are crucial to fault locating and these alarms are considered as key alarms. In contract, certain alarms interfere in fault locating and these alarms are considered as interference alarms. Key alarms and interference alarms, however, have correlations between each other. The packet domain supports the alarm correlation analysis function. Hence, alarm correlation information helps in locating faults.

Correlated alarms have the following characteristics:

  • Alarms (root alarms) directly caused by a fault or an exception may generate other alarms (correlated alarms). A root alarm and its correlated alarms have correlations.
  • If multiple alarms occur due to the same fault or exception, these alarms are correlated.

On the packet domain, the alarm correlation rules are as follows:

  • Alarm masking is implemented on the same equipment.
  • The root alarm masks its correlated alarms.
  • An alarm resulting from a fault at a lower layer of the hierarchical service model masks off the alarms resulting from a fault at an upper layer of the hierarchical service model.
NOTE:

The hierarchical service model contains the physical layer, data link layer, tunnel layer, PW layer, and emulated service layer, in an ascending order. In the service model, upper layers function depending on the services provided by lower layers. When a lower layer and an upper layer have faults at the same time, the fault at the lower layer must be removed prior to removing the fault at the upper layer. At this time, the alarm resulting from the lower-layer fault masks off the alarm resulting from the upper-layer fault.

Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 respectively illustrate the alarm correlation rules for the packet Ethernet services transmitted at the Ethernet port based on the MPLS and MPLS-TP protocols.

Figure 2-2  Alarm correlation rules for the Ethernet services transmitted over Ethernet ports

Figure 2-3  Alarm correlation rules for the packet Ethernet services transmitted at the Ethernet port based on the MPLS-TP protocol

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Updated: 2019-01-21

Document ID: EDOC1100020975

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