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OSN 500 550 580 V100R008C50 Commissioning and Configuration Guide 02

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Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Basic Concepts

Basic Concepts

Learning about the basic concepts helps to further understand Ethernet services.

E-Line Services Carried by PWs

In the topology, the E-Line services are point-to-point services. The E-Line services realize the point-to-point transmission of Ethernet services.

E-Line Services Carried by PWs (Based on VLANs)

Figure 3-1 shows the networking diagram of the E-Line services carried by PWs.

The branches of Company A and Company B are located in City 1 and City 2, and need to communicate with each other. The services of Company A and Company B need to be isolated from each other. In this case, you can configure the E-Line services that are carried by PWs and from the user side to the network side, to realize the communication between the branches of Company A or Company B. In addition, different services are carried by different PWs, therefore realizing the isolation of the services of Company A from the services of Company B.

The services that are accessed from the user side are encapsulated and transmitted to the PWs. Then, the services are transmitted through the tunnel.

The E-Line services of different companies are carried by different PWs and then to the same port on the network side. In this manner, the port resources on the network side are saved and the bandwidth utilization is increased. In the uplink direction of the user side, layered QoS configuration can be performed for data packets.

Figure 3-1  E-Line services carried by PWs (based on VLANs)

E-Line Services Carried by PWs (Based on VLAN Priorities)

Figure 3-2 shows the networking diagram of the E-Line services carried by PWs (based on VLAN priorities). This type of E-Line maps packets with a same VLAN ID but different VLAN priorities to different PWs.

Services from NodeB 1 and services from NodeB 2 have a same VLAN ID of 100 but different VLAN priorities, and need to be transported to a same RNC. Services from NodeB 1 have a VLAN priority of 3, and services from NodeB 2 have a VLAN priority of 2. To isolate services from NodeB 1 and services from NodeB 2, the services are mapped to different PWs based on Port+VLAN+VLAN PRI before being transported to the RNC.

The services that are received from the UNI are encapsulated into PWs and then carried on tunnels. In the uplink direction of the UNI, hierarchical QoS configuration can be performed for data packets.

Figure 3-2  E-Line services carried by PWs (based on VLAN priorities)
E-Line Services Carried by PWs (Based on VLAN Switching)

Figure 3-3 shows the networking diagram for E-Line services carried by PWs (based on VLAN switching). To transport different NodeBs' services that have a same VLAN ID but are previously transported to different RNCs to a same RNC, this type of E-Line services enables VLAN switching to differentiate the services before they are transported to the RNC.

Services from NodeB 1 and services from NodeB 2 have a same VLAN ID of 100, and need to be transported to a same RNC. To differentiate services from NodeB 1 and services from NodeB 2, VLAN switching is required. After VLAN switching, the VLAN ID of services from NodeB 1 remains unchanged, whereas the VLAN ID of services from NodeB 2 is changed to 200.

The services that are received from the UNI are encapsulated into PWs and then carried on tunnels. In the uplink direction of the UNI, hierarchical QoS configuration can be performed for data packets.

Figure 3-3  E-Line services carried by PWs (based on VLAN switching)

E-LAN Services Carried on PWs

The PW-carried E-LAN services are point-to-multipoint and multipoint-to-multipoint services. The equipment realizes the point-to-multipoint and multipoint-to-multipoint transmission of Ethernet services through the E-LAN.

Service Models

Table 3-1 defines the PW-carried E-LAN service models.

Table 3-1  PW-carried E-LAN service models
Service Model Service Flow Service Direction Port Mode Port Encapsulation Type Description
Model 1

PORT+C-VLAN (source)

PW (sink)

UNI-NNI

Layer 2 (source)

Layer 3 (sink)

IEEE 802.1q (source)

- (sink)

A UNI port processes the packets carrying a specific C-VLAN ID based on its tag attribute and then sends the packets to the NNI side for transmission on PWs.
Model 2

PORT+S-VLAN (source)

PW (sink)

UNI-NNI

Layer 2 (source)

Layer 3 (sink)

QinQ (sink)

- (sink)

A UNI port processes the packets carrying a specific S-VLAN ID based on its QinQ type field, and then sends the packets to the NNI side for transmission on PWs.
Model 3

PORT (source)

PW (sink)

UNI-NNI

Layer 2 (source)

Layer 3 (sink)

IEEE 802.1q or QinQ (source)

- (sink)

A UNI port processes the received packets based on its tag attribute or QinQ type field, and then sends the packets to the NNI side for transmission on PWs.
Typical Application

Figure 3-4 shows the typical application of service model 1. Branch A and Branch B do not communicate with each other, and the data of them should be separated from each other. The headquarter, however, needs to communicate with all the branches.

Service 1 is present between Branch A and Branch A, service 2 is present between Branch B and Branch B, and the two services are present between branches and headquarter, The two services carry different VLAN IDs and need to be transmitted over a PSN.

On the UNI side of NE1, service 1 is received by port 1 and service 2 is received by port 2. On the NNI side of NE1, service 1 and service 2 are transmitted separately on two PWs.

On the UNI side of NE2, service 1 and service 2 are received by port 1. On the NNI side of NE2, service 1 and service 2 are transmitted separately on two PWs.

NE3 processes the two services in the same manner as NE1.

Figure 3-4  Typical application of service model 1

Figure 3-5 shows the typical application of service model 2. Branch A and Branch B do not communicate with each other, and the data of them should be separated from each other. The headquarter, however, needs to communicate with all the branches.

Service 1 is present between Branch A and Branch A, service 2 is present between Branch B and Branch B, and the two QinQ services are present between branches and headquarter, The two services carry different S-VLAN IDs and need to be transmitted over a PSN.

On the UNI side of NE1, service 1 is received by port 1 and service 2 is received by port 2. On the NNI side of NE1, service 1 and service 2 are transmitted separately on two PWs.

On the UNI side of NE2, service 1 and service 2 are received by port 1. On the NNI side of NE2, service 1 and service 2 are transmitted separately on two PWs.

NE3 processes the two services in the same manner as NE1.

Figure 3-5  Typical application of service model 2

Figure 3-6 shows the typical application of service model 3. Branch A and Branch B do not communicate with each other, and the data of them should be separated from each other. The headquarter, however, needs to communicate with all the branches.

Service 1 is present between Branch A and Branch A, service 2 is present between Branch B and Branch B, and the two QinQ services are present between branches and headquarter, Service 1 carries various C-VLAN IDs, and service 2 carries various S-VLAN IDs. The two services need to be transmitted over a PSN.

On the UNI side of NE1, service 1 is received by port 1 and service 2 is received by port 2. On the NNI side of NE1, service 1 and service 2 are transmitted separately on two PWs.

NE3 and NE3 process the two services in the same manner as NE1.

Figure 3-6  Typical application of service model 3

Ethernet Port

This section describes user-to-network interfaces (UNIs) that are connected to user equipment and network-to-network interfaces (NNIs) that are connected to the packet transport network on a network deployed with E-Line and E-LAN services.

UNI

A UNI refers to the Ethernet port that is connected to user equipment. A UNI is a physical port and it is used for the user-side configuration of an Ethernet service.

A V-UNI is a logical virtual user-network interface. Each service on a UNI corresponds to a logical V-UNI.

A UNI can receive multiple services, which means that a UNI may correspond to multiple V-UNIs.

NNI

An NNI refers to the Ethernet port that is connected to the packet transport network. An NNI is used for the network-side configuration of an Ethernet service.

To transmit PW-carried Ethernet services, create static MPLS tunnels at NNIs and then create PWs to carry Ethernet services. This method enables different Ethernet services to be encapsulated into different PWs and transmitted in a tunnel to the same NNI, decreasing the number of occupied NNIs and improving bandwidth utilization.

VPLS

Virtual private LAN service (VPLS), also called transparent LAN service (TLS) or virtual private switched network service, is a Layer 2 virtual private network (L2VPN) technology that is based on Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) and Ethernet technologies.

VPLS helps service providers provide users with Ethernet-based multipoint services over MPLS backbone networks.

VPLS has the following basic concepts:

  • Pseudo wire (PW): A PW is an emulated connection between two provider edge (PE) nodes for transmitting frames. PWs are established and maintained by PE nodes through signaling protocols. The status information of a PW is maintained by the two end PE nodes of a PW.
  • Virtual switch instance (VSI): Each VSI provides independent VPLS services. VSIs have Ethernet bridge functions and can terminate PWs.

Split Horizon Group

Convergence services received from different ports are isolated to prevent a broadcast storm resulting from a service loop and improve service security. To implement service isolation, you can configure a split horizon group for the E-LAN services at the specified nodes. The logical ports in one split horizon group cannot forward packets to each other.

Figure 3-7 shows a typical application of the split horizon group. NEs on the network are configured with E-LAN services, and the east and west ports and service access ports are configured as mounted ports of a bridge. In this case, if a split horizon group is not configured at NE1, broadcast storm occurs due to a network loop as the east and west ports can forward packets to each other. If a split horizon group is created at NE1 and the east and west ports are configured as members of the split horizon group, the east and west ports do not forward packets to each other. Therefore, a service loop is prevented.

Figure 3-7  Split horizon group

NOTE:
For ring topology, in addition to a split horizon group, the spanning tree protocol must be configured for prevent route flapping caused by frequent update of MAC addresses.
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Updated: 2019-01-21

Document ID: EDOC1100020976

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