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OSN 500 550 580 V100R008C50 Commissioning and Configuration Guide 02

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Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Basic Concepts

Basic Concepts

Before configuring the Ethernet services, you need to be familiar with the basic concepts.

Ethernet Port Numbers

On the NMS, Ethernet ports are represented by PORTs.

  • OptiX OSN 550:
    • For the EM6F, GE1 and GE2 correspond to PORT-1 and PORT-2 respectively; FE1 to FE4 correspond to PORT-3 to PORT-6 respectively.
    • For the EM6T, GE1 and GE2 correspond to PORT-1 and PORT-2 respectively; FE1 to FE4 correspond to PORT-3 to PORT-6 respectively.
    • For the EF8F, FE1 to FE8 correspond to PORT-1 to PORT-8 respectively.
    • For the EX1, 10GE1 corresponds to PORT-1.
    • For the EG4C: GE1 to GE4 and FE1 to FE4 both correspond to PORT-1 to PORT-4.
      NOTE:

      The EG4C provides 4xGE/FE optical/electrical ports. The former four ports are pluggable SFP optical ports and the latter four are fixed electrical ports. The ports with the same number cannot be used simultaneously.

  • OptiX OSN 500:
    • For the EM6F, GE1 and GE2 correspond to PORT-1 and PORT-2 respectively; FE1 to FE4 correspond to PORT-3 to PORT-6 respectively.
    • For the EM6T, GE1 and GE2 correspond to PORT-1 and PORT-2 respectively; FE1 to FE4 correspond to PORT-3 to PORT-6 respectively.
    • For the EF8F, FE1 to FE8 correspond to PORT-1 to PORT-8 respectively.
  • OptiX OSN 580:
    • For the EM20, 10GE1 to 10GE8 correspond to PORT-1 to PORT-8 respectively; GE1 to GE12 correspond to PORT-9 to PORT-20 respectively.

Auto-Negotiation

The auto-negotiation function allows the network equipment to send information of its supported working mode to the opposite end on the network and to receive the corresponding information that the opposite end may transfer.

Auto-Negotiation Function of FE Electrical Ports
NOTE:
If auto-negotiating equipment does not support the half-duplex mode, the auto-negotiation result will be a full-duplex mode at the corresponding rate level.

In the case of FE electrical ports, there are four common working modes: 10M half-duplex, 10M full-duplex, 100M half-duplex, and 100M full-duplex. If the working mode of the local FE electrical port does not match the working mode of the opposite FE electrical port, the two ports cannot communicate with each other. With the auto-negotiation function, however, the two ports can communicate with each other. The auto-negotiation function uses fast link pulses and normal link pulses to transfer the negotiation information of the working mode so that the working mode of the local FE electrical port matches the working mode of the opposite FE electrical port.

Table 3-145 lists the FE auto-negotiation rules.

Table 3-145  Auto-negotiation rules of FE electrical ports (when the local FE electrical port adopts the auto-negotiation mode)
Working Mode of the Opposite FE Electrical Port Auto-Negotiation Result
Auto-negotiation 100M full-duplex
10M half-duplex 10M half-duplex
10M full-duplex 10M half-duplex
100M half-duplex 100M half-duplex
100M full-duplex 100M half-duplex
NOTE:

As provided in Table 3-145, when the working mode of the opposite FE electrical port is 10M full-duplex or 100M full-duplex, the auto-negotiation result cannot realize the matching between the working modes of the FE electrical ports at both ends. As a result, certain packets are lost. Hence, when the working mode of the opposite FE electrical port is 10M full-duplex or 100M full-duplex, you need to set the working mode of the local FE electrical port to 10M full-duplex or 100M full-duplex.

When the FE electrical ports at both ends work in auto-negotiation mode, the equipment at both ends can negotiate the flow control function through the auto-negotiation function.

Auto-Negotiation Function of GE Electrical Ports

In the case of GE electrical ports, there are five working modes: 10M half-duplex, 10M full-duplex, 100M half-duplex, 100M full-duplex, and 1000M full-duplex. The auto-negotiation function of GE electrical ports is similar to the auto-negotiation function of FE electrical ports. Table 3-146 lists the auto-negotiation rules of GE electrical ports.

Table 3-146  Auto-negotiation rules of GE electrical ports (when the local GE electrical port adopts the auto-negotiation mode)
Working Mode of the Opposite GE Electrical Port Auto-Negotiation Result
Auto-negotiation (GE electrical port) 1000M full-duplex
Auto-negotiation (FE electrical port) 100M full-duplex
10M half-duplex 10M half-duplex
10M full-duplex 10M half-duplex
100M half-duplex 100M half-duplex
100M full-duplex 100M half-duplex
1000M full-duplex 1000M full-duplex
NOTE:

As provided in Table 3-146, when the working mode of the opposite GE electrical port is 10M full-duplex or 100M full-duplex, the auto-negotiation result cannot realize the matching between the working modes of the GE electrical ports at both ends. As a result, certain packets are lost. Hence, when the working mode of the opposite GE electrical port is 10M full-duplex or 100M full-duplex, you need to set the working mode of the local GE electrical port to 10M full-duplex or 100M full-duplex.

When the GE electrical ports at both ends work in auto-negotiation mode, the equipment at both ends can negotiate the flow control function through the auto-negotiation function.

Auto-Negotiation Function of GE Optical Ports

GE optical ports support only the 1000M full-duplex working mode. The auto-negotiation function of GE optical ports is used only for negotiating the flow control function.

Flow Control Function

When the equipment fails to handle the flow received at the port due to poor data processing/transferring capability, congestion occurs on the line. To reduce the number of discarded packets caused by buffer overflow, proper flow control measures must be taken.

The half-duplex Ethernet port applies the back-pressure mechanism to control the flow. The full-duplex Ethernet port applies PAUSE frames to control the flow. Currently, the half-duplex Ethernet function is not widely applied. Hence, the flow control function realized by Ethernet service boards is used for the full-duplex Ethernet ports.

The flow control function realized by Ethernet service boards is classified into two types: auto-negotiation flow control and non-auto-negotiation flow control.

Auto-Negotiation Flow Control

When the Ethernet port works in auto-negotiation mode, you can adopt the auto-negotiation flow control function. The auto-negotiation flow control modes include the following:

  • Asymmetric PAUSE toward the link partner

    The port can transmit PAUSE frames in the case of congestion but cannot process the received PAUSE frames.

  • Symmetric PAUSE

    The port can transmit PAUSE frames and process the received PAUSE frames.

  • Both asymmetric and symmetric PAUSE

    The port has the following capabilities:

    • Transmits and processes PAUSE frames.
    • Transmits PAUSE frames but cannot process the received PAUSE frames.
    • Processes the received PAUSE frames but cannot transmit PAUSE frames.
  • Disabled

    The port does not transmit or process PAUSE frames.

NOTE:

The OptiX OSN equipment supports only two auto-negotiation flow control modes, namely, disabled mode and symmetric PAUSE mode.

Non-Auto-Negotiation Flow Control

When the Ethernet port works in a fixed working mode, you can adopt the non-auto-negotiation flow control function. The non-auto-negotiation flow control modes include the following:

  • Send only

    The port can transmit PAUSE frames in the case of congestion but cannot process the received PAUSE frames.

  • Receive only

    The port can process the received PAUSE frames but cannot transmit PAUSE frames in the case of congestion.

  • Symmetric

    The port can transmit PAUSE frames and can also process received PAUSE frames.

  • Disabled

    The port does not transmit or process PAUSE frames.

NOTE:

The OptiX OSN equipment supports only two non-auto-negotiation flow control modes, namely, disabled mode and symmetric mode.

Native Ethernet Service Types Based on the Packet Plane

Based on the packet plane, Native Ethernet services are classified into six types.

Point-to-Point Transparently Transmitted E-Line Services

The point-to-point transparently transmitted E-Line services are the basic E-Line model. Point-to-point transmission does not involve service bandwidth sharing, service isolation, or service distinguishing; instead, Ethernet services are transparently transmitted between two service access points.

Service Model

Table 3-147 describes the point-to-point transparently transmitted E-Line service model.

Table 3-147  Point-to-point transparently transmitted E-Line service model
Service Model Encapsulation Type Service Direction Traffic Flow Description
Model 1

Null (source)

Null (sink)

UNI-UNI

PORT (source)

PORT (sink)

The source port transparently transmits all the received Ethernet frames to the sink port.
Model 2

802.1Q (source)

802.1Q (sink)

UNI-UNI

PORT (source)

PORT (sink)

The source port processes the incoming Ethernet frames based on its TAG attribute, and then sends the processed Ethernet frames to the sink port. The sink port processes the Ethernet frames based on its TAG attribute, and then exports the processed Ethernet frames.
NOTE:
In service model 2, ports process the received Ethernet frames according to their TAG attributes. Therefore, service model 2 is not a real transparent transmission model and is not recommended.
Typical Application

Figure 3-17 shows the typical application of service model 1.

Figure 3-17  Typical application of service model 1

In service model 1, Ethernet service 1 and Ethernet service 2, which carry no VLAN ID or carry unknown VLAN IDs, are accessed to NE1 through port 1 and port 2 respectively. Port 1 and port 2 transparently transmit Ethernet service 1 and Ethernet service 2 to port 3 and port 4, respectively. Port 3 and port 4 then transmit Ethernet service 1 and Ethernet service 2 to NE2. Service processing on NE2 is the same as on NE1.

In service model 2, Ethernet service 1 and Ethernet service 2, which carry unknown VLAN IDs, are accessed to NE1 through port 1 and port 2 respectively. Port 1 and Port 2 process the incoming packets based on their TAG attributes. Then, Port 1 and Port 2 send Ethernet service 1 and Ethernet service 2 to Port 3 and Port 4 respectively. Port 3 and Port 4 process the incoming packets based on their TAG attributes. Then, Port 3 and Port 4 send Ethernet service 1 and Ethernet service 2 to NE2. Service processing on NE2 is the same as on NE1.

VLAN-Based E-Line Services

VLANs can be used to separate E-Line services. With the VLAN technology, multiple E-Line services can share one physical channel. These services are VLAN-based E-Line services.

Models of Services

Table 3-148 shows the models of VLAN-based E-Line services.

Table 3-148  Models of VLAN-based E-Line services
Type of Service Encapsulation Mode of Port Direction of Service Flow of Service Description of Service
VLAN-based E-Line services

802.1Q (source)

802.1Q (sink)

UNI-UNI

PORT+VLAN (source)

PORT+VLAN (sink)

NOTE:
The VLAN ID of the source and the VLAN ID of the sink must be the same.
The source port processes the incoming Ethernet frames based on its TAG attribute, and then sends the Ethernet frames with a specific VLAN ID to the sink port. The sink port processes the Ethernet frames based on its TAG attribute, and then exports the processed Ethernet frames.
Typical Applications

Figure 3-18 shows the typical application of VLAN-based E-Line services. Service 1 and Service 2 carry different VLAN IDs. Therefore, after the two Ethernet services are accessed to NE1 through Port 1 and Port 2 respectively, they can share the same transmission channel at Port 3.

On NE1, Port 1 and Port 2 process the incoming packets based on their own TAG attributes. Then, Port 1 and Port 2 send Service 1 and Service 2 to Port 3. Port 3 processes all the outgoing packets based on its TAG attribute, and then sends Service 1 and Service 2 to NE2. Due to the different VLAN IDs, Service 1 and Service 2 can be transmitted through Port 3 at the same time.

NE2 processes Service 1 and Service 2 in the same manner as NE1.

Figure 3-18  Model of VLAN-based E-Line services

QinQ-Based E-Line Services

S-VLAN tags can be used to isolate E-Line services. Therefore, multiple E-Line services can share one physical channel. These services are QinQ-based E-Line services.

NOTE:
E-Line Services Carried on PWs describes QinQ-based E-Line services carried by PWs.
Model of Service

Table 3-149 shows the models of QinQ-based E-Line services.

Table 3-149  Models of QinQ-based E-Line Services
Model of Service Encapsulation Mode of a Port Direction Flow of Service Description of Service
Model 1

Null (source)

QinQ (sink)

UNI-NNI

PORT (source)

QinQ link (sink)

The source port adds the S-VLAN tag that corresponds to the QinQ link to all the Ethernet frames, and then transmits the Ethernet frames to the sink port where the QinQ link is configured.
Model 2

802.1Q (source)a

QinQ (sink)

UNI-NNI

PORT (source)

QinQ link (sink)

The source port accesses only the Ethernet frames that carry C-VLAN tags. It adds the S-VLAN tag that corresponds to the QinQ link to all the Ethernet frames, and then transmits the Ethernet frames to the sink port where the QinQ link is configured.
Model 3

802.1Q (source)a

QinQ (sink)

UNI-NNI

PORT+C-VLAN (source)

QinQ link (sink)

The source port adds the S-VLAN tag that corresponds to the QinQ link to all the Ethernet frames that carry specific C-VLAN tags, and then transmits the Ethernet frames to the sink port where the QinQ link is configured.
Model 4

QinQ (sink)

QinQ (sink)

NNI-NNI

QinQ link (source)

QinQ link (sink)

The source port transmits the Ethernet frames that carry the S-VLAN tag to the sink port where the sink QinQ link is configured. The S-VLAN tag carried in the Ethernet frames corresponds to the source QinQ link. If the source and sink QinQ links correspond to different S-VLAN tags, the S-VLAN tags carried in the Ethernet frames are exchanged.
NOTE:

a: Set TAG to Tag Aware.

Typical Applications

Figure 3-19 shows the typical application of service model 1.

Service 1 and Service 2 include tagged frames and untagged frames. Service 1 is accessed to NE1 through Port 1, and Service 2 is accessed to NE1 through Port 2. Port 1 adds the corresponding S-VLAN tag to Service 1, and Port 2 adds the corresponding S-VLAN tag to Service 2. Then, Service 1 and Service 2 are transmitted to Port 3. Port 3 transmits Service 1 and Service 2 to NE2.

NE2 processes Service 1 and Service 2 in the same manner as NE1.

Figure 3-19  Typical application of service model 1

Figure 3-20 shows the typical application of service model 2.

Service 1 and Service 2 carry different unknown C-VLAN tags. Service 1 is accessed to NE1 through Port 1, and Service 2 is accessed to NE1 through Port 2. Port 1 adds the corresponding S-VLAN tag to Service 1, and Port 2 adds the corresponding S-VLAN tag to Service 2. Then, Service 1 and Service 2 are transmitted to Port 3. Port 3 transmits Service 1 and Service 2 to NE2.

NE2 processes Service 1 and Service 2 in the same manner as NE1.

Figure 3-20  Typical application of service model 2

Figure 3-21 shows the typical application of service model 3.

Service 1 and Service 2 carry different C-VLAN tags. Service 1 is accessed to NE1 through Port 1, and Service 2 is accessed to NE1 through Port 2. Port 1 adds the corresponding S-VLAN tag to Service 1, and Port 2 adds the corresponding S-VLAN tag to Service 2. Then, Service 1 and Service 2 are transmitted to Port 3. Port 3 transmits Service 1 and Service 2 to NE2.

NE2 processes Service 1 and Service 2 in the same manner as NE1.

Figure 3-21  Typical application of service model 3

Figure 3-22 shows the typical application of service model 4.

Service 1 and Service 2 carry a same S-VLAN tag. Service 1 is accessed to NE1 through Port 1, and Service 2 is accessed to NE1 through Port 2. Port 1 changes the S-VLAN tag carried in Service 1 and Port 2 changes the S-VLAN tag carried in Service 2 so that the S-VLAN tags carried in Service 1 and Service 2 are different. Port 3 transmits Service 1 and Service 2 to NE2.

NE2 processes Service 1 and Service 2 in the same manner as NE1.

Figure 3-22  Typical application of service model 4
E-LAN Services Based on the 802.1d Bridge

In the case of E-LAN services, packets can be forwarded only based on the MAC address table. These E-LAN services are E-LAN services based on the 802.1d bridge.

Model of Service

Table 3-150 shows the model of E-LAN services based on the 802.1d bridge.

Table 3-150  Model of E-LAN services based on the 802.1d bridge
Type of Service Encapsulation Mode of Port Tag Attribute Type of Logical Port Learning Mode Sub-Switching Domain
E-LAN services based on the 802.1d bridge Null Tag-Transparent PORT SVL No division of sub-switching domains
Typical Application

Figure 3-23 shows the typical application of the model of service. The transmission network needs to carry the A services accessed from NE2 and NE3. The two A services are converged at the convergence node NE1. The services need not to be isolated. Therefore, an 802.1d bridge is used at NE1 to groom services.

Figure 3-23  Model of E-LAN services based on the 802.1d bridge

E-LAN Services Based on 802.1q Bridge

E-LAN services can be separated by setting VLANs. In this case, a bridge is divided into multiple sub-switching domains. Therefore, the E-LAN services separated by setting VLANs are E-LAN services based on 802.1q bridge.

Model of Service

Table 3-151 shows the models of E-LAN services based on 802.1q bridge.

Table 3-151  Model of E-LAN services based on 802.1q bridge
Type of Service Encapsulation Mode of Port TAG Attribute Type of Logical Port Learning Mode Sub-Switching Domain
E-LAN services based on 802.1q bridge 802.1q C-Aware PORT+VLAN IVL Sub-switching domains are divided based on VLANs.
Typical Applications

Figure 3-24 shows the typical application of the model of E-LAN services based on 802.1q bridge. The transmission network needs to carry G and H services accessed from NE2 and NE3. Both types of services are converged on NE1. G and H services adopt different VLAN planning. Therefore, 802.1q bridge is used on NEs and sub-switching domains are divided based on VLANs, differentiating and separating the two types of services.

Figure 3-24  Model of E-LAN services based on 802.1q bridge

NOTE:
You can configure VLAN-Based E-Line Services on NE2 and NE3 for service access.
E-LAN Services Based on 802.1ad Bridge

S-VLAN tags can be used to isolate E-LAN services. Therefore, a bridge is divided into multiple independent sub-switching domains. These services are E-LAN services based on 802.1ad bridge.

Model of Service

Table 3-152 shows the models of E-LAN services based on 802.1ad bridge.

Table 3-152  Models of E-LAN services based on 802.1ad bridge
Type of Services Encapsulation Mode of Port Tag Attribute Type of Logical Port Learning Mode Sub-Switching Domain
E-LAN services based on 802.1ad bridge

Null or 802.1q (UNI port) a

QinQ (NNI port)

S-Aware

PORT (The encapsulation mode of the UNI port is Null.)

PORT or PORT+C-VLAN (The encapsulation mode of the UNI port is 802.1q.) a

PORT+S-VLAN (NNI port)

IVL Sub-switching domains are divided based on S-VLAN tags.
NOTE:
a: When the encapsulation mode of port is 802.1q, the tag attribute must be Tag Aware.
Typical Applications

Figure 3-25 shows the typical application of the model of service. The transmission network needs to carry G and H services accessed from NE2 and NE3. The two types of services are converged on NE1. Since G and H services have a same C-VLAN tag, you need to add different S-VLAN tags to G and H services for service isolation.

Figure 3-25  Model of E-LAN services based on 802.1ad bridge

NOTE:
You can configure QinQ-Based E-Line Services on NE2 and NE3 for service access.

Managing a MAC Address Table

The entries in a MAC address table indicate the corresponding relationship between MAC addresses and ports. A MAC address table contains the following entries: dynamic entry, static entry, and blacklist entry.

NOTE:
If one dynamic entry is not updated in a certain period, that is, if no new packet from this MAC address is received to enable the re-learning of this MAC address, this dynamic entry is automatically deleted. This mechanism is called aging, and this period is called aging time.
  • Dynamic entry

    A dynamic entry is obtained by learning of a bridge through the SVL/IVL mode. The dynamic entry ages.

  • Static entry

    A static entry is manually added by a network administrator to the MAC address table by using the NMS. The static entry does not age. Generally, the static entry is configured when a port corresponds to a device with its MAC address known and this device transmits large traffic for a long time.

  • Blacklist entry

    A blacklist entry, that is, the MAC disabled entry, is used to discard the data frame that contains the specified MAC address (source MAC address or destination MAC address). A blacklist entry is also called a blackhole entry. The blacklist entry is configured by the network administrator. The blacklist entry does not age, and is not lost after the Ethernet processing board is reset.

VLAN Forwarding Table

Generally, the VLAN IDs of VLAN-based E-Line services are not changed. If it is required to change the VLAN IDs, you need to configure a VLAN forwarding table.

In the case of VLAN-based E-Line services, the VLAN IDs on the source and sink nodes are usually set to the same value. If it is required that packets carry different VLAN IDs on the source and sink nodes, the different VLAN IDs need to be set on the source and sink nodes of the E-Line services. In addition, you need to configure a VLAN forwarding table to achieve the exchange of VLAN IDs at the source and sink nodes.

Single Service Transmit

Figure 3-26 shows an application of the VLAN forwarding table. In this figure, Service 1 carries a VLAN ID of 100 and is transmitted to NE1 through Port 1. On a transmission network, the VLAN ID of Service 1 may be in conflict with the VLAN IDs of other services. To avoid this situation, the VLAN ID of Service 1 must be changed to another value before it is transmitted on the transmission network and then be changed to the original value after it is transmitted out of the transmission network. Therefore, a VLAN forwarding table is configured at NE1 and NE2, so that the VLAN IDs of services between Port 1 and Port 3 can be changed as required. With regard to Service 1, when it traverses NE1, the VLAN ID is changed from 100 to 200 and then changes to 100 again at NE2.

Figure 3-26  Application of VLAN forwarding tables to single E-Line service

Multi-Services Transmit

Figure 3-27 shows the application of VLAN forwarding tables. Service 1 and Service 2 carry the same VLAN ID, and the services are accessed to NE1 through Port 1 and Port 2 respectively. The services need to be separated so that they can be transmitted through one port at the same time. Configure the VLAN forwarding table on NE1 for changing the VLAN ID of the service transmitted between Port 1 and Port 3. After Service 1 is accessed into NE1, the VLAN ID of Service 1 is changed from 100 to 200. Therefore, Service 1 and Service 2 carry different VLAN IDs at Port 3 and the services are separated.

NE2 processes Service 1 and Service 2 in the same manner as NE1.

Figure 3-27  Application of VLAN forwarding tables to multi E-Line services

Split Horizon Group

Convergence services received from different ports are isolated to prevent a broadcast storm resulting from a service loop and improve service security. To implement service isolation, you can configure a split horizon group for the E-LAN services at the specified nodes. The logical ports in one split horizon group cannot forward packets to each other.

Figure 3-28 shows a typical application of the split horizon group. NEs on the network are configured with E-LAN services, and the east and west ports and service access ports are configured as mounted ports of a bridge. In this case, if a split horizon group is not configured at NE1, broadcast storm occurs due to a network loop as the east and west ports can forward packets to each other. If a split horizon group is created at NE1 and the east and west ports are configured as members of the split horizon group, the east and west ports do not forward packets to each other. Therefore, a service loop is prevented.

Figure 3-28  Split horizon group

NOTE:
For ring topology, in addition to a split horizon group, the spanning tree protocol must be configured for prevent route flapping caused by frequent update of MAC addresses.
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Updated: 2019-01-21

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