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Log Reference

CloudEngine 8800, 7800, 6800, and 5800 V200R005C00

This document provides the explanations, causes, and recommended actions of logs on the product.
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ISIS/5/IS_ADJ_CHANGE

ISIS/5/IS_ADJ_CHANGE

Message

ISIS/5/IS_ADJ_CHANGE:ISIS-INFO: ISIS adjacency state changed. (IfName=[IfName], AdjLevel=[AdjLevel], NbrSysId=[LspId], AdjState=[AdjState], AddressFamily=[AddressFamily], Reason=[Reason], LastSendHelloTime=[LastSendHelloTime], LastRecvHelloTime=[LastRecvHelloTime], CpuUsage=[CpuUsage], LocalIpv4Add=[LocalIpv4Add], LocalIpv6Add=[LocalIpv6Add], PeerIpv4Add=[PeerIpv4Add], PeerIpv6Add=[PeerIpv6Add], VpnName=[VpnName], SysInstId=[SysInstId], OldAdjState=[OldAdjState], IfMtu=[IfMtu], SubReason=[SubReason])

Description

The status of the neighbor changed.

Parameters

Parameter Name Parameter Meaning

IfName

Indicates the name of a corresponding interface on a neighbor.

AdjLevel

Indicates the level of the neighbor whose status changes.

NbrSysId

Indicates the ID of an LSP.

AdjState

Indicates the former status of a neighbor.

AddressFamily

Indicates the address family of a neighbor.

Reason

Indicates the cause of the neighbor status change.

LastSendHelloTime

Indicates the time when the Hello packet was last sent.

LastRecvHelloTime

Indicates the time when the Hello packet was last received.

CpuUsage

Indicates the CPU usage.

LocalIpv4Add

IPv4 address of the local interface

LocalIpv6Add

IPv6 address of the local interface

PeerIpv4Add

IPv4 address of the neighbor

PeerIpv6Add

IPv6 address of the neighbor

VpnName

VPN instance name

SysInstId

IS-IS process ID

OldAdjState

Former status of the neighbor

IfMtu

Interface MTU

SubReason

Detailed cause of the neighbor status change:
  • The neighbor went Up.
  • The neighbor was deleted.
  • The interface was deleted.
  • The interface was suppressed.
  • An error packet was received.
  • Authentication failed.
  • A system ID conflict occurred on the network.
  • The number of area addresses reached the upper limit.
  • Level-1 area addresses were different.
  • No Hello packets were received.
  • The physical interface was Down.
  • Protocol types were different.
  • Memory was insufficient.
  • The BFD session was Down.
  • IS-IS was shut down.
  • The handshake mode was changed.
  • The neighbor was reset.
  • The interface type was changed.
  • IS-IS was reset.
  • The last network entity was deleted.
  • The IS-IS process was deleted.
  • The Levels were different.
  • The IIH packet did not carry the local SNPA address.
  • The neighbor relationship did not go Up after the 3-way handshake process.
  • No matched MT ID existed.
  • The circuit ID was changed.
  • The Hello packet received from the neighbor did not carry the local system ID.
  • Other errors occurred.
  • The checksum was incorrect.
  • It was due to association between IS-IS and multicast.
  • Topology suppression
  • The alarm timed out.
  • Configurations were changed.

Possible Causes

1. Holdtime of IS-IS neighbor is out.

2. Interface went down.

3. Protocol reason.

4. BFD detect that the neighbor is down.

5. Configuration changed.

6. The reason of the other device.

Procedure

  1. Find the NbrSysId field (in hexadecimal format) in the trap to identify the system ID of the source . Then, check whether the neighbor status on both ends is the same.

    • If so, go to Step 12.

    • If not, go to Step 2.

  2. Download the user logs from the source , and then find out the cause for the neighbor status change according to the logs. Check whether the neighbor status is changed because the interface goes Down.

    • If so, go to Step 3.

    • If not, go to Step 10.

  3. Find information about the local interface from the logs, and then check the interface status and MTU status on the interface. Ensure that both the interface status and MTU status on two ends are Up. Then, check whether the neighbor status on both ends is the same.

    • If so, go to Step 13.

    • If not, go to Step 4.

  4. Check the system IDs and ensure that the system IDs on both ends are correct. Then, check whether the neighbor status on both ends is the same.

    • If so, go to Step 13.

    • If not, go to Step 5.

  5. Check the levels of the IS-IS process and ensure that levels on both ends match. Then, check whether the neighbor status on both ends is the same.

    • If so, go to Step 13.

    • If not, go to Step 6.

  6. Check the area ID of the and ensure that area IDs on both ends are the same. Then, check whether the neighbor status on both ends is the same.

    • If so, go to Step 13.

    • If not, go to Step 7.

  7. Check that IP addresses of interfaces on both ends belong to the same network segment. Then, check whether the neighbor status on both ends is the same.

    • If so, go to Step 13.

    • If not, go to Step 8.

  8. Check whether the authentication mode is configured on both ends and ensure that the encryption authentication modes on both ends are the same. If authentication is required, ensure that the authentication modes and passwords on both ends are the same. Otherwise, authentication is disabled on both ends (disabling authentication degrades the system security). Then, check whether the neighbor status on both ends is the same.

    • If so, go to Step 13.

    • If not, go to Step 9.

  9. Check whether interfaces on both ends can transmit Hello packets normally and ensure that they can transmit Hello packets normally. Then, check whether the neighbor status on both ends is the same.

    • If so, go to Step 13.

    • If not, go to Step 10.

  10. Run the display cpu command to check whether the CPU usage remains 100% in a period of time.

    • If so, go to Step 11.

    • If not, go to Step 12.

  11. Run the isis timer hello command in the interface view to set the interval for sending Hello packets to a larger value, which increases by 10s each time. Prolonging the interval for sending Hello packets slows down the detection of network faults and thus slows down route convergence. Then, check whether the neighbor statuses on both ends are the same.

    • If so, go to Step 13.

    • If not, go to Step 12.

  12. Collect the trap information, log information, and configuration, and then contact technical support personnel technical personnel.
  13. End.
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Updated: 2019-04-20

Document ID: EDOC1100039602

Views: 138275

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