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FusionStorage V100R006C30 Block Storage Service Disaster Recovery Feature Guide 03

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Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Configuring the Network for the Replication Plane

Configuring the Network for the Replication Plane

Scenarios

This section describes how to configure the network of the replication plane.

Prerequisites

Conditions

System Requirements have been met.

Data

You have obtained:

  • Two IP addresses planned for the replication plane.
  • Password of user root on the desired server.
  • Management plane IP address of the desired server.

Procedure

  1. Open a browser on the local PC, enter http://BMC IP address of the server in the address bar, and press Enter to go to the login page.
  2. Log in to the iBMC of the server as prompted.

    The default username and password for logging in to the server BMC system is Administrator and Admin@9000, respectively.

  3. Click Remote Control.

    For some Huawei servers, you must choose Remote Virtual Console (shared mode) on the Remote Control page to open the remote control window.

    The remote control window is displayed.

  4. Log in to the server as user root as prompted.
  5. Run the following command to go to the path of the configuration file:

    • If the Red Hat, Oracle, CentOS, or EulerOS is used, run the cd /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts command.
    • If the SUSE is used, run the cd /etc/sysconfig/network command.

  6. Use the vi editor to open the configuration file for modifying network port information. Table 2-8 Provides an example.

    NOTE:
    The following steps provide an example of configuring the network port configuration file using the vi editor:
    1. Run the vi Configuration file name command to open the network port configuration file using vi editor.

      For example, run the vi ifcfg-eth0 command.

    2. Press i to enter editing mode.
    3. Edit the configuration file.
    4. Press Esc and enter :wq to save the modification and exit the vi editor.

    Table 2-8  Configuration file information

    File Name

    File Content (for Red Hat, Oracle, CentOS, and EulerOS)

    File Content (For SUSE)

    ifcfg-eth0

    TYPE=Ethernet

    PROXY_METHOD=none

    BROWSER_ONLY=no

    BOOTPROTO=static

    DEFROUTE=no

    IPV4_FAILURE_FATAL=no

    IPV6INIT=yes

    IPV6_AUTOCONF=yes

    IPV6_DEFROUTE=yes

    IPV6_FAILURE_FATAL=no

    IPV6_ADDR_GEN_MODE=stable-privacy

    NAME=eth0

    UUID=8a06f7f6-a663-4889-87a9-ddacf4de6e8f

    DEVICE=eth0

    ONBOOT=yes

    MM_CONTROLLED=no

    IPADDR=IP address

    NETMASK=Subnet mask

    BOOTPROTO='static'

    BROADCAST=''

    ETHTOOL_OPTIONS=''

    IPADDR='IP address/subnet mask'

    MTU=''

    NAME='82540EM Gigabit Ethernet Controller'

    NETWORK=''

    REMOTE_IPADDR=''

    STARTMODE='auto'

    USERCONTROL='no'

    ifcfg-eth1

    TYPE=Ethernet

    PROXY_METHOD=none

    BROWSER_ONLY=no

    BOOTPROTO=static

    DEFROUTE=no

    IPV4_FAILURE_FATAL=no

    IPV6INIT=yes

    IPV6_AUTOCONF=yes

    IPV6_DEFROUTE=yes

    IPV6_FAILURE_FATAL=no

    IPV6_ADDR_GEN_MODE=stable-privacy

    NAME=eth1

    UUID=5a08g7f6-a443-4229-77d9-daacf4de6d6a

    DEVICE=eth1

    ONBOOT=yes

    MM_CONTROLLED=no

    IPADDR=IP address

    NETMASK=Subnet mask

    BOOTPROTO='static'

    BROADCAST=''

    ETHTOOL_OPTIONS=''

    IPADDR='IP address/subnet mask'

    MTU=''

    NAME='82540EM Gigabit Ethernet Controller'

    NETWORK=''

    REMOTE_IPADDR=''

    STARTMODE='auto'

    USERCONTROL='no'

  7. Run the following commands to make the configuration take effect and run the ifconfig command to check whether the configuration takes effect. If the IP addresses configured in the preceding step are displayed in the command output, the configuration takes effect.

    ifdown eth0; ifup eth0

    ifdown eth1; ifup eth1

    ifconfig

  8. (Optional) Specify a gateway for the two network ports.

    NOTE:
    This step is required only when the local IP addresses and the remote IP addresses belong to different VLANs.

    Command: route add -net IP address of the network port/subnet mask gw Gateway dev Network port name

    For example, run the following commands to specify a gateway for two network ports:

    route add -net 192.168.10.0/24 gw 192.168.10.1 dev eth0
    route add -net 192.168.10.0/24 gw 192.168.10.1 dev eth1
    NOTE:
    If you want to specify the gateway to take effect permanently, write the preceding commands to the following file. The commands take effect automatically after the system is started:
    • For Red Hat, Oracle, CentOS, and EulerOS: /etc/rc.local
    • For SUSE: /etc/init.d/boot.local

  9. (Optional) Configure policy-based route

    NOTE:
    • Policy-based routing needs to be configured only when the two IP addresses at the replication plane are on the same network segment.
    • The value range of the routing table priority is from 0 to 255. Check the priorities of existing routing tables written in the /etc/iproute2/rt_tables file, and ensure that the priority values of the routing tables do not conflict.

    1. Configure routing tables.

      For example, run the following two commands to configure routing table rep_eth0 with priority 200 for eth0 and configure routing table rep_eth1 with priority 201 for eth1.

      [root@localhost ~]# echo "200 rep_eth0" >> /etc/iproute2/rt_tables
      [root@localhost ~]# echo "201 rep_eth1" >> /etc/iproute2/rt_tables

    2. Configure policy-based routing rules based on the routing tables.

      The following provides an example. Configure rules based on your actual requirements.

      1. Example for network port 1:
        • Network port name: eth0
        • Routing table name: rep_eth0
        • IP address: 192.168.10.31
        • Network segment/subnet mask: 192.168.10.0/24
      2. Example for network port 2:
        • Network port name: eth1
        • Routing table name: rep_eth1
        • IP address: 192.168.10.32
        • Network segment/subnet mask: 192.168.10.0/24
      [root@localhost ~]# ip route flush table rep_eth0
      [root@localhost ~]# ip route flush table rep_eth1
      [root@localhost ~]# ip rule add from 192.168.10.31 table rep_eth0
      [root@localhost ~]# ip rule add from 192.168.10.32 table rep_eth1
      [root@localhost ~]# ip route add 192.168.10.0/24 dev eth0 src 192.168.10.31 table rep_eth0
      [root@localhost ~]# ip route add 192.168.10.0/24 dev eth1 src 192.168.10.32 table rep_eth1
      [root@localhost ~]# ip route add default dev eth0 via 192.168.10.31 table rep_eth0
      [root@localhost ~]# ip route add default dev eth1 via 192.168.10.32 table rep_eth1
      
      NOTE:
      • After the configuration is completed, you can run the ip route show command to view the routing rules.
      • Policy-based routes configured in 9 are temporary routes. To add the routs permanently, write the preceding commands to the following file. The system automatically adds related route settings when being started.
        • For Red Hat, Oracle, CentOS, and EulerOS: /etc/rc.local
        • For SUSE: /etc/init.d/boot.local

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Updated: 2019-01-17

Document ID: EDOC1100044928

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