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NE40E V800R010C10SPC500 Feature Description - Virtual Access 01

This is NE40E V800R010C10SPC500 Feature Description - Virtual Access
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Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Application Scenarios for Virtual Access

Application Scenarios for Virtual Access

Deploying an Eth-Trunk Interface in a Virtual Access Scenario

Service Description

On a network with a virtual access system deployed, deploy an Eth-Trunk interface on a CE and master to increase the link bandwidth between the CE and AP without adding hardware resources. The deployment improves link reliability and implements load balancing.

Networking Description

Typical networking scenarios for Eth-Trunk interface deployment are as follows:

  • A CE accesses a single master through a single AP.

    Figure 3-39 Single-AP, single-master networking
  • A CE accesses two masters through a single AP.

    Figure 3-40 Single-AP, dual-master networking
Feature Deployment
  1. Create a trunk interface on the CE and add two directly connected interfaces to the trunk interface. Create a virtual access trunk interface on the master, and add the virtual access interfaces for the two APs' external communication interfaces to the virtual access trunk interface.

  2. On the networks shown in Figure 3-39 and Figure 3-40, an Eth-Trunk interface can be configured to work in either manual mode or static LACP mode.

HQoS Implementation in Virtual Access Scenarios

This section describes hierarchical quality of service (HQoS) implementation in virtual access scenarios.

Service Description

With the rapid development of network services, a large number of devices are deployed at the access layer of an existing MAN or mobile bearer network, which brings various networking changes. From the perspective of customers, complex planning and protocol configurations are required for service deployment, which results in high network O&M costs. Huawei provides a virtual access solution to reduce O&M costs without increasing network device investments. Virtual access is typically used for MAN virtualization in a fixed broadband (FBB) solution.

Networking Description

On the network shown in Figure 3-41, profile-based HQoS is configured on the virtual interface of the router. The master interface connecting to the AP is the virtual access interface. After profile-based HQoS is configured and applied to the virtual access interface, HQoS is enabled in the virtual access system.

Figure 3-41 HQoS implementation in virtual access scenarios

BRAS Implementation in Virtual Access Scenarios

This section describes how to deploy BRAS services in virtual access scenarios.

Service Description

As network services are developing rapidly, the access layer of the MAN or mobile bearer network houses more devices with varying networking. Service deployment requires complex planning and protocol configuration, which brings high network O&M costs. Huawei provides a virtual access solution to reduce O&M costs without increasing network device investments. Virtual access is typically used for MAN virtualization in a fixed broadband (FBB) solution. BRAS services are deployed in a virtual access system. An AP functions as a master's subcard, and its interfaces function as BAS interfaces for user access.

Networking Description

In a virtual access system, an AP does not identify access users and forwards only user packets. All IPoE/PPPoE user packets are sent to a master for termination over a PW.

A terminal user accesses an AP through a Layer 2 device. The AP encapsulates data and protocol packets with vaPW and vaLSP labels and transparently transmits the packets to the master. The master then processes the protocol packets and initiates authentication to the RADIUS server. After obtaining service authorization, the terminal user can access the corresponding services.

Figure 3-42 BRAS deployment in virtual access scenarios
  • After an IPoE/PPPoE/L2TP user starts the IP terminal or manually dials up, the IP terminal sends an access message, which is relayed to an AP through an access device. The AP encapsulates the access message with the vaPW and vaLSP labels and transparently transmits it to a master.

  • The master removes the vaPW and vaLSP labels from the access message and interacts with the DHCP and RADIUS servers to assign an IP address to the IP terminal and authenticate and authorize the IP terminal.

  • The IP terminal can access a service system to use services. After a data packet is forwarded to the AP, the AP encapsulates the data packet with vaPW and vaLSP labels and transparently transmits it to the master.

  • The master removes the vaPW and vaLSP labels from the data packet and forwards it to the IP network.

Typical Networking

Typical networking scenarios for BRAS service deployment in a virtual access system are as follows:

  • Typical PPPoE networking in virtual access scenarios

    After a user dials up to a master using PPPoE, the master assigns an IP address to the user. Then, the user can use the assigned IP address to access an external network.

    Figure 3-43 Typical PPPoE networking in virtual access scenarios

    The feature is deployed as follows:

    • An IP terminal (for example, a PC) initiates PPPoE negotiation with the master through the CPE and negotiates a session ID.

    • After PPPoE negotiation is complete, PPP negotiation starts and LCP negotiation is completed in the PPP negotiation phase.

    • In the PPP negotiation phase, the master initiates authentication to an authentication server (for example, a RADIUS server).

    • After authentication is successful, IPCP negotiation is performed if the user is an IPv4-only user. The CPE obtains the assigned IPv4 address from the master. The IP terminal (for example, a PC) obtains the assigned internal network address through the CPE, and accesses an external network through the NAT function provided by the CPE and the public network IP address assigned by the master. PPPoE access may not pass through the CPE either. The IP terminal can directly initiate an access request to the AP. After obtaining the assigned public IPv4 address from the master, the IP terminal can access an external network.

      IPv6CP negotiation is performed if the user is an IPv6-only user. The CPE obtains the assigned IPv6 address from the master.

      IPCP and IPv6CP negotiations are performed if the user is an IPv4/IPv6 dual-stack user. The CPE obtains the assigned IPv4 and IPv6 addresses from the master.

  • Typical IPoE networking in virtual access scenarios

    A Layer 2 access user accesses a master through a Layer 2 device. The access user's address can be assigned using DHCP on the master or through a remote DHCP server.

    Figure 3-44 Typical IPoE networking in virtual access scenarios
  • Typical L2TP networking in virtual access scenarios

    A master supports virtual access for LACs. A terminal dials up over PPPoX, and PPPoE, PPPoEoVLAN, and PPPoEoQ packets are supported. An AP encapsulates packets with vaPW and vaLSP labels and transparently transmits them to the master. The master then removes the vaPW and vaLSP labels for LAC authentication and forwarding.

    Figure 3-45 Typical L2TP networking in virtual access scenarios
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Updated: 2019-01-03

Document ID: EDOC1100055053

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