No relevant resource is found in the selected language.

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Read our privacy policy>Search

Reminder

To have a better experience, please upgrade your IE browser.

upgrade

NE40E V800R010C10SPC500 Feature Description - Virtual Access 01

This is NE40E V800R010C10SPC500 Feature Description - Virtual Access
Rate and give feedback:
Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Control Plane for IP RAN Virtual Cluster Access

Control Plane for IP RAN Virtual Cluster Access

The core idea of virtual cluster access is to centralize control planes.

In a traditional IPRAN solution, nodes' control planes are independent and distributed, and each node itself discovers the topology, calculates routes, and generates the forwarding table.

After virtual cluster access is deployed, the AGG collects the entire network's resources (including node label space, node information, and interface information), calculates routes on the entire network, and delivers forwarding entries to nodes. The node on the access side is responsible for forwarding only. In this manner, most control planes on the entire network are centralized on masters.

The following describes the process for implementing virtual cluster access.

Process for Implementing Virtual Cluster Access

Table 2-4 describes the process for implementing virtual cluster access when a single AP is deployed on a ring network.
Table 2-4 Process for implementing virtual cluster access
Procedure Description
Resource pool establishment for virtual cluster access

1. An AP uses the management IP addresses configured for the primary and secondary masters to send requests for establishing Master Slave Control Protocol (MSCP) channels to the masters.

2. After the MSCP channels are established, the AP registers with the masters and reports its own resources, including label space, node, and interface information. The masters save the resources to their respective global resource pools.

Figure 2-7 Procedure for establishing resource pools
Route calculation for virtual cluster access

1. The AP and masters use extended Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS) to advertise their respective topology information to each other. A global topology database is formed on the masters.

2. The primary master uses the topology database to calculate routes between the AP and primary master, between the AP and secondary master, and between the primary and secondary masters.

3. The primary master uses the MSCP channel to deliver the route calculation results to the secondary master.

Figure 2-8 Procedure for calculating routes
Forwarding entry establishment and delivery

1. The primary and secondary masters choose LSP and PW labels from their respective global resource pools based on the route calculation results and establish forwarding entries for the AP.

2. The primary and secondary masters deliver the forwarding entries to the AP.

Figure 2-9 Procedure for establishing and delivering forwarding entries
Tunnel and PW establishment After the AP receives the forwarding entries from the primary and secondary masters, it saves them to the local forwarding table. Figure 2-10 shows the LSPs and PWs established for virtual cluster access.
Figure 2-10 LSPs and PWs established for virtual cluster access

Interworking with an Aggregation Ring

Virtual cluster access is implemented only on the access ring of an IPRAN. To implement end-to-end service bearing, the access ring must interwork with the aggregation ring of the IPRAN. The following content describes implementation details in various service scenarios. The primary and secondary masters have the same implementation principles. For simplified description, a single master is used as an example.

Service Scenario 1: Ethernet services are carried when base stations use different IP network segments.

The master uses a Remote-AP interface to terminate a VC to an AP. L3VPN access using an L2VPN is implemented based on an interface loopback.

Figure 2-11 Ethernet service bearing when base stations use different IP network segments

Service Scenario 2: Ethernet services are carried when base stations use the same IP network segment.

Remote-AP interfaces terminate multiple VCs on the access ring. The vBridge interface is bound to an L3VPN instance established between the master and the RSG. To implement L3VPN access using an L2VPN and ensure end-to-end traffic forwarding, add the Remote-AP interfaces to a vBridge broadcast domain.

Figure 2-12 Ethernet service bearing when base stations use the same IP network segment

Service Scenario 3: ATM/TDM services are carried.

The master uses a Remote-AP interface to terminate a VC to an AP. The PWs on the access and aggregation rings form an MS-PW through a Remote-AP interface.

Figure 2-13 ATM/TDM service bearing
Translation
Download
Updated: 2019-01-03

Document ID: EDOC1100055053

Views: 1604

Downloads: 28

Average rating:
This Document Applies to these Products
Related Documents
Related Version
Share
Previous Next