No relevant resource is found in the selected language.

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Read our privacy policy>Search

Reminder

To have a better experience, please upgrade your IE browser.

upgrade

NE40E-M2 V800R010C10SPC500 Feature Description - LAN Access and MAN Access 01

This is NE40E-M2 V800R010C10SPC500 Feature Description - LAN Access and MAN Access
Rate and give feedback:
Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
MAC Flapping-based Loop Detection for VPLS Networks

MAC Flapping-based Loop Detection for VPLS Networks

On the virtual private LAN service (VPLS) network shown in Figure 13-2, pseudo wires (PWs) are established over Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) tunnels between virtual private network (VPN) sites to transparently transmit Layer 2 packets. When forwarding packets, the provider edges (PEs) learn the source MAC addresses of the packets, create MAC address entries, and establish mapping between the MAC addresses and AC interfaces and mapping between the MAC addresses and PWs.

Figure 13-2 VPLS network with MAC flapping-based loop detection enabled

On the network shown in Figure 13-2, CE2 and CE3 are connected to PE1 to provide redundant links. This deployment may generate loops because the connections on the user network of CE2 and CE3 are unknown. Specifically, if CE2 and CE3 are connected, PE1 interfaces connected to CE2 and CE3 may receive user packets with the same source MAC address, causing MAC address entry flapping or even damaging MAC address entries. In this situation, you can deploy MAC flapping-based loop detection on PE1 and configure a blocking policy for AC interfaces to prevent such loops. The blocking policy can be either of the following:
  • Blocking interfaces based on their blocking priorities: If a device detects a loop, it blocks the interface with a lower blocking priority.
  • Blocking interfaces based on their trusted or untrusted states: If a device detects a loop, it blocks the untrusted interface.

MAC flapping-based loop detection can also detect PW-side loops. The principles of blocking PWs are similar to those of blocking AC interfaces.

In addition, MAC flapping-based loop detection can associate an interface with its sub-interfaces bound with virtual switching instances (VSIs). If a loop occurs in the VSI bound to a sub-interface, the sub-interface is blocked. However, a loop may also exist in a VSI bound to another sub-interface. If the loop is not eliminated in time, it will cause traffic congestion or even a network breakdown. To inform the network administrator of loops, enable MAC flapping-based loop detection association on the interface of the sub-interfaces bound with VSIs. In this situation, if a sub-interface bound with a VSI is blocked due to a loop, the interface on which the sub-interface is configured is also blocked and an alarm is generated. After that, all the other sub-interfaces bound with VSIs are blocked.

Download
Updated: 2019-01-02

Document ID: EDOC1100058405

Views: 16601

Downloads: 18

Average rating:
This Document Applies to these Products
Related Version
Related Documents
Share
Previous Next