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Configuration Guide - IP Routing 01

NE05E and NE08E V300R003C10SPC500

This is NE05E and NE08E V300R003C10SPC500 Configuration Guide - IP Routing
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Configuring BGP4+ 6PE

Configuring BGP4+ 6PE

BGP4+ 6PE enables separated IPv6 networks to communicate using the MPLS tunneling technology.

Usage Scenario

6PE enables IPv6 networks separated by IPv4/MPLS networks to communicate.

Separated IPv6 networks can be connected using various tunneling techniques. A 6PE tunnel is established on Internet Service Provider's (ISP's) PEs that support the IPv4/IPv6 dual stack. The 6PE tunnel identifies IPv6 routes by label assigned by the Multiprotocol Border Gateway Protocol (MP-BGP), and implements IPv6 forwarding using LSPs between PEs.

As shown in Figure 11-6, the IPv6 network where CE1 and CE2 reside are separated by an IPv4/MPLS network. Configuring 6PE enables CE1 and CE2 to communicate across the IPv4 network.

Figure 11-6 Networking with 6PE

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring BGP4+ 6PE, complete the following tasks:

  • Connect interfaces and setting parameters for the interfaces to ensure that the physical-layer status of the interfaces is Up.

  • Configure the link layer protocol parameters for interfaces.

  • Ensure that routes on the IPv4/MPLS backbone network are reachable.

Configuration Procedures

Figure 11-7 Flowchart for configuring BGP4+ 6PE

Configuring the IPv4/IPv6 Dual Stack

The IPv4/IPv6 dual stack needs to be configured on the NE at the edge of an IPv6 network and an IPv4 network.

Procedure

  1. Run system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run interface interface-type interface-number

    The view of the IPv4 network-side interface is displayed.

  3. Run ip address ipv4-address { mask | mask-length }

    An IPv4 address is configured for the interface.

  4. Run quit

    Return to the system view.

  5. Run interface interface-type interface-number

    The view of the IPv6 network-side interface is displayed.

  6. Run ipv6 enable

    IPv6 is enabled on the interface.

  7. Run ipv6 address { ipv6-address prefix-length | ipv6-address/prefix-length } eui-64 or ipv6 address { ipv6-address prefix-length | ipv6-address/prefix-length }

    An IPv6 address is configured for the interface.

  8. Run commit

    The configuration is committed.

Configuring an LDP LSP on an IPv4 Network

An LDP LSP is configured on an IPv4/MPLS backbone network to forward IPv6 packets.

Procedure

  1. Run system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run mpls lsr-id lsr-id

    An LSR ID is configured.

  3. Run mpls

    MPLS is enabled and the MPLS view is displayed.

  4. (Optional) Run lsp-trigger { all | host | ip-prefix ip-prefix-name | none }

    An LSP triggering policy is configured.

    Currently, the NE automatically distributes labels to host routes with 32-bit masks. The command in this step needs to be run to distribute labels to routes of other types or specific routes.

  5. Run quit

    Return to the system view.

  6. Run mpls ldp

    LDP is enabled and the LDP view is displayed.

  7. Run quit

    Return to the system view.

  8. Run interface interface-type interface-number

    The view of the IPv4 network-side interface is displayed.

  9. Run mpls

    MPLS is enabled on the interface.

  10. Run mpls ldp

    LDP is enabled on the interface.

  11. Run commit

    The configuration is committed.

Establishing a 6PE Peer Relationship Between PEs

6PE peers can exchange IPv6 routes learned from their attached CEs.

Procedure

  1. Run system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run bgp as-number

    The BGP view is displayed.

  3. Run peer ipv4-address as-number as-number

    The IP address of the peer and the number of the AS where the peer resides are specified.

  4. Run peer ipv4-address connect-interface interface-type interface-number

    The interface that is used to establish a connection with the remote PE is specified.

  5. Run ipv6-family unicast

    The BGP-IPv6 unicast address family view is displayed.

  6. Run peer ipv4-address enable

    A 6PE peer relationship is established.

  7. Run peer ipv4-address label-route-capability

    The function of sending labeled routes is enabled.

  8. Run commit

    The configuration is committed.

(Optional) Enabling 6PE Routes Sharing the Explicit Null Label

By enabling IPv6 Provider Edge (6PE) routes sharing the explicit null label, you can save label resources on 6PE devices.

Context

By default, the 6PE device applies for a label for each 6PE route. When a large number of 6PE routes need to be sent, a large number of labels are required. This greatly wastes label resources and causes IPv6 routes unable to be advertised due to the shortage of label resources.

After 6PE routes sharing the explicit null label is enabled, all 6PE routes to be sent to the same 6PE peer share the explicit null label 2.

Procedure

  1. Run system-view

    The system view is displayed.

  2. Run bgp { as-number-plain | as-number-dot }

    The BGP view is displayed.

  3. Run ipv6-family unicast

    The BGP-IPv6 unicast address family view is displayed.

  4. Run apply-label explicit-null

    All 6PE routes to be sent to the same 6PE peer share the explicit null label.

    If you run this command after a 6PE peer relationship is established, temporary packet loss occurs.

  5. Run commit

    The configuration is committed.

Configuring Route Exchange Between a PE and a CE

An IPv6 routing protocol needs to be configured on a PE and a CE to enable them to learn IPv6 routes from each other.

Context

The routing protocol running between a PE and a CE can be EBGP, IBGP, IPv6 static route, IS-IS, RIPng, or OSPFv3. For details, see the configuration of each routing protocol in the NE deviceMid-End Router Configuration Guide - IP Routing.

Verifying the Configuration of BGP4+ 6PE

After configuring BGP4+ 6PE, check whether CEs can learn routes to each other.

Procedure

  1. Run the display bgp ipv6 peer command on each PE to check the status of the BGP4+ peer relationship.
  2. Run the display mpls ldp session [ vpn-instance vpn-instance-name ] [ verbose | peer-id ] command on each PE to check the status of the LDP session.
  3. Run the display bgp ipv6 routing-table ipv6-address prefix-length command on each PE or the display ipv6 routing-table ipv6-address prefix-length [ longer-match ] [ verbose ] command on each CE to check the routes destined for the remote IPv6 network.

Example

  • Run the display bgp ipv6 peer [ verbose ] command. The following command output shows that BGP4+ peer relationships have been established.

    <PE> display bgp ipv6 peer
    
     BGP local router ID : 11.11.11.11
     Local AS number : 100
     Total number of peers : 2         Peers in established state : 2
    
      Peer            V          AS  MsgRcvd  MsgSent  OutQ  Up/Down       State  PrefRcv
      22.22.22.22     4         100      177      178     0 01:59:30 Established        1
      1::1            4       65410      158      163     0 01:30:00 Established        1
  • Run the display mpls ldp session command. The following command output shows that an LDP session has been established between PEs.

    <PE> display mpls ldp session
    
     LDP Session(s) in Public Network
     Codes: LAM(Label Advertisement Mode), SsnAge Unit(DDD:HH:MM)                  
     Codes: LAM(Label Advertisement Mode), SsnAge Unit(DDD:HH:MM)
     An asterisk (*) before a session means the session is being deleted.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
     PeerID             Status      LAM  SsnRole  SsnAge       KASent/Rcv
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
     22.22.22.22:0      Operational DU   Passive  000:02:01   493/686
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL: 1 Session(s) Found.
  • Run the display bgp ipv6 routing-table ipv6-address prefix-length command on each PE or the display ipv6 routing-table command on each CE. The following command output shows the routes destined for the remote IPv6 network.

    <PE> display bgp ipv6 routing-table 6::6 128
    
     BGP local router ID : 11.11.11.11
     Local AS number : 100
     Paths : 1 available, 1 best, 1 select
     BGP routing table entry information of 6::6/128:
     Label information (Received/Applied): 2/NULL
     From: 22.22.22.22 (22.22.22.22) 
     Route Duration: 0d01h49m43s
     Relay IP Nexthop: 10.1.1.2
     Relay IP Out-interface: GigabitEthernet0/2/0
     Relay Tunnel Out-Interface: GigabitEthernet0/2/0
     Original nexthop: ::FFFF:22.22.22.22
     AS-path 65420, origin igp, MED 0, localpref 100, pref-val 0, valid, internal, b
    est, select, pre 255
     Advertised to such 1 peers:
        1::1
    <CE> display ipv6 routing-table 6::6 128
    Routing Table : _public_
    Summary Count : 1
    
     Destination  : 6::6                          PrefixLength : 128
     NextHop      : 1::2                            Preference   : 255
     Cost         : 0                               Protocol     : BGP
     RelayNextHop : 1::2                            TunnelID     : 0x0
     Interface    : GigabitEthernet0/1/0               Flags        : RD
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Updated: 2019-01-14

Document ID: EDOC1100058916

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