No relevant resource is found in the selected language.

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Read our privacy policy>Search

Reminder

To have a better experience, please upgrade your IE browser.

upgrade

CLI-based Configuration Guide - Interface Management

AR100, AR120, AR160, AR1200, AR2200, AR3200, and AR3600 V300R003

This document provides the basic concepts, configuration procedures, and configuration examples of the interfaces supported by the device.
Rate and give feedback:
Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Using Links of 3G Cellular Interfaces as Primary Links to Connect to the Internet

Using Links of 3G Cellular Interfaces as Primary Links to Connect to the Internet

3G Access of Branches

Because some branches are located in remote areas, it is difficult to deploy fixed networks. Or, the data service volume is limited, and using wired access is expensive. 3G access has become a better choice for these branches. Chain stores and gas stations are typical branches.

Figure 11-1 shows the 3G access scenario of branches. Router_1 and Router_2 are egress gateways of the branches. Branch 1 is used as an example.

  1. The branch connects to the Internet through the 3G network, and then connects to the headquarters using Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) Virtual Private Network (VPN). IPSec ensures secure data exchanges between the headquarters and branch.
  2. Because Router_1 is connected to the Internet, the firewall and attack defense function must be enabled on 3G interfaces to ensure network security. To use 3G links effectively, you can enable the P2P traffic limiting function on Router_1. The P2P traffic limiting function is used to block P2P applications such as eMule and BT that consume a large amount of bandwidth.
Figure 11-1  3G access of branches

3G Access for Devices in Buildings

For some devices deployed in buildings, such as off-bank ATMs, it is difficult for the devices to access fixed network resources. Additionally, the location of these devices may change frequently. If wired network access service is deployed, subsequent maintenance workload is heavy. 3G access can solve these problems.

Figure 11-2 shows the 3G access scenario of off-bank ATMs.

  1. As shown in Figure 11-2, the Figure 11-2 is placed in the ATM. To ensure network reliability and security, the Router must be a 3G router or support 3G interface cards.
  2. The Router is connected to 3G indoor remote antennas to resolve signal shielding problems of the ATM.
  3. The Router connects to the 3G network first, and then connects to the bank branch through IPSec VPN.
  4. Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) certificates can be used for IPSec VPN to improve network security and avoid password loss and theft.
  5. To prevent information security issues caused by router theft, request carriers to provide dedicated SIM cards and bind the SIM cards with specified base stations.
Figure 11-2  3G access for devices in a building

3G Access at Temporary Sites

Temporary sites, such as construction sites and exhibition sites, require quick network deployment. Using wired access requires a long period of time and has high costs. Nevertheless, the 3G network access can provide fast and low-cost network deployment. Additionally, if the router supports Wi-Fi, cabling is not required at the sites. PCs and mobile terminals of enterprise employees can access the router through Wi-Fi, and then visit the Internet or headquarters through the 3G network.

Figure 11-3 shows the 3G access at a temporary site.

  1. The router that supports 3G access and Wi-Fi, for example, Router in Figure 11-3, is deployed at the temporary site.
  2. The Router connects to the Internet through the 3G network.
  3. IPSec VPN can be configured on the Router to connect the temporary site with the headquarters.
  4. The Wi-Fi function is enabled on the Router so that PCs and mobile terminals can access the Router through Wi-Fi.
  5. As the Router is connected to the Internet, the firewall and attack defense function must be enabled on 3G interfaces to ensure network security. To use 3G links effectively, you can enable the P2P traffic limiting function on the Router. The P2P traffic limiting function is used to block P2P applications such as eMule and BT that consume a large amount of bandwidth.
Figure 11-3  3G access at a temporary site

3G Access on Mobile Vehicles

Wired network access services cannot be deployed on mobile vehicles such as buses and metro trains. In 3G access mode, routers supporting Wi-Fi can be placed on mobile vehicles. PCs and mobile terminals of passengers can access the routers through Wi-Fi, and then visit the Internet or enterprise headquarters through the 3G network.

Figure 11-4 shows the 3G access on mobile vehicles.

  1. Routers that support 3G access and Wi-Fi, for example, the Router in Figure 11-4, are deployed on mobile vehicles.
  2. The Router is connected to 3G indoor remote antennas to ensure strong 3G signals on mobile vehicles.
  3. After the Router is connected to the 3G network, IPSec is configured on the Router and IPSec VPN is created between mobile vehicles and enterprise headquarters. IPSec technology ensures secure data exchanges between mobile vehicles and enterprise headquarters.
  4. The Wi-Fi function is enabled on the Router so that PCs and mobile terminals can access the Router through Wi-Fi.
Figure 11-4  3G access on mobile vehicles

Translation
Download
Updated: 2019-03-06

Document ID: EDOC1100069331

Views: 21270

Downloads: 95

Average rating:
This Document Applies to these Products
Related Documents
Related Version
Share
Previous Next