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Configuration Guide - Network Management and Monitoring

CloudEngine 8800, 7800, 6800, and 5800 V200R005C10

This document describes the configurations of Network Management and Monitoring, including SNMP, RMON, NETCONF, OpenFlow, LLDP, NQA, Mirroring, Packet Capture, Packet Trace, Path and Connectivity Detection Configuration, NetStream, sFlow, and iPCA.
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Huawei uses machine translation combined with human proofreading to translate this document to different languages in order to help you better understand the content of this document. Note: Even the most advanced machine translation cannot match the quality of professional translators. Huawei shall not bear any responsibility for translation accuracy and it is recommended that you refer to the English document (a link for which has been provided).
Understanding OVSDB

Understanding OVSDB

The VMware NSX controller manages and deploys virtual tunnel end point (VTEP) devices through the open vSwitch database (OVSDB) management protocol. The CE switch supports the virtual extensible LAN (VXLAN) and OVSDB management protocols and therefore, the CE switch can work with the VMware NSX controller on the software-defined networking (SDN) network. First, the controller and the switch establish an OVSDB connection to exchange information. Then, the controller delivers the subscription information, VXLAN configuration, MAC address, and other information to the switch through OVSDB. Based on the information delivered by the controller, the switch reports subscription contents, configures the VXLAN function, and establishes VXLAN tunnels with other VTEP devices on the network.

OVSDB Connection Establishment

The CE switch and the VMware NSX controller establish an OVSDB connection based on the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). The CE switch serves as the SSL client while the VMware NSX controller serves as the SSL server. The OVSDB connection is established as follows:
  1. Load an SSL certificate to the switch and add a public key to the VMware NSX controller.
  2. On the switch, configure OVSDB connection parameters including the IP address and port of the controller, and enable the switch to proactively send an SSL connection request. After the configuration, the VMware NSX controller and the switch begin to establish an SSL connection. For details, see SSL Implementation.
  3. After the SSL connection is established, the VMware NSX controller sends a get schema request demanding for the OVSDB schema model of the switch. After receiving the request, the switch returns OVSDB schema information. The returned OVSDB schema information only contains the entry format defined in the OVSDB schema model, but does not contain specific data.
  4. After receiving the OVSDB schema information, the VMware NSX determines whether it can exchange this information with the peer device. If it can, the VMware NSX controller sends subscription information to subscribe for the global table and manager table in the OVSDB database. After receiving subscription information, the switch returns subscription results, that is, the global table and manager table.
    • Global table: includes the information about the VMware NSX controller and the CE switch.
    • Manager table: includes the information about the OVSDB connection between the CE switch and the VMware NSX controller, including the IP address, port, and heartbeat information about the controller.

    If data in the global table and manager table changes, the switch informs the VMware NSX controller of such changes in real time.

  5. After receiving the global table and manager table, the VMware NSX controller sends the IP addresses of other controllers in the same cluster to the switch.

  6. After receiving the IP addresses of other controllers, the switch establishes SSL connections with these controllers.

NOTE:

the switch can establish OVSDB connections with one VMware NSX controller cluster at most. One cluster supports a maximum of 5 VMware NSX controllers.

Figure 6-3 OVSDB connection establishment process

OVSDB Connection Maintenance

After the switch establishes OVSDB connections with all controllers in a VMware NSX controller cluster, only the primary controller interacts with the switch. The OVSDB connections between secondary controllers and the switch are maintained through heartbeat detection.

During t1, if a controller does not interact with the switch, this switch proactively sends heartbeat detection packets. During t1, if the controller does not respond to heartbeat detection or interact with the switch, this switch regards this controller as faulty and disconnects the SSL connection. In every t2, the switch proactively sends an SSL connection request until an SSL connection is successfully established.

Both t1 and t2 can be configured. Specifically, t1 corresponds to inactivity_probe while t2 corresponds to max_backoff in the controller ip command.

Figure 6-4 OVSDB connection maintenance process

Service Interaction

After the switch establishes OVSDB connections with all controllers in a VMware NSX controller cluster, the switch interacts with these controllers. Table 6-1 shows the key information about interaction between the switch and the controllers. Interaction process:
NOTE:

The service interaction process mainly involves the interaction of key information. For detailed interaction information, see OVSDB Schema Table.

  1. The VMware NSX controller subscribes for MAC address, port, and bidirectional forwarding detection (BFD) status from the switch.

  2. When the VMware NSX controller has not delivered VXLAN and BFD configurations, the OVSDB database of the switch only contains MAC address and port information. Therefore, the subscription results returned by the switch only contain MAC address and port information.

  3. After collecting other MAC address information on the network, the VMware NSX controller synchronizes this information with the switch. After receiving MAC address information, the switch saves this information in the OVSDB database and returns results.

  4. The VMware NSX controller delivers VXLAN and BFD configurations to the switch. After receiving VXLAN and BFD configurations, the switch saves these configurations in the OVSDB database and returns results.

  5. The switch completes VXLAN and BFD configuration.

If information about the MAC address, port, or BFD session status of the switch changes, the switch proactively notifies the VMware NSX controller of such changes. If the MAC address on the VMware NSX controller changes, this controller proactively synchronizes this information with the switch.

Table 6-1 Key information interacted between the CE switch and the VMware NSX controller

Item

Interaction Information

Contents reported by the CE switch to the VMware NSX controller

VTEP IP address of the VXLAN tunnel

Port information about the CE switch

MAC addresses learned by the CE switch

Contents delivered by the VMware NSX controller to the CE switch

IP addresses of other VTEP devices on the network

MAC addresses learned by other VTEP devices on the network

VMware replicator information

VXLAN network identifier (VNI) information

Figure 6-5 Service interaction process
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Updated: 2019-04-20

Document ID: EDOC1100075365

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