Hardware Structure of CG

abrahim  Diamond  (1)
6 years 10 months ago  View: 2216  Reply: 3

The hardware structure of the CG9812 varies with the different Servers used by the CG9812.

The hardware structure of the CG9812 in the two scenarios is as follows:

  • If the CG9812 uses the Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) boards, the hardware structure of the CG9812 includes the following:
    • Rack
    • Subrack
    • Boards
  • If the CG9812 uses the PC Servers, the hardware structure of the CG9812 includes the following:
    • Rack
    • PC Server

Rack

In the UGW/GSN, the service shelves of the CG9812 and UGW/GSN are installed in the same rack. The CG9812 uses the N68E-22 rack developed by Huawei.

 
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The 19-inch N68E-22 rack complies with the following international standards:
  • IEC60297-1, Dimensions of mechanical structures of the 482.6 mm (19 in) series Part 1:Panels and racks
  • IEC60297-2, Dimensions of mechanical structures of the 482.6 mm (19 in) series Part 2:Cabinets and pitches of rack structures
  • IEC60297-3, Dimensions of mechanical structures of the 482.6 mm (19 in) series Part 3:Subracks and associated plug-in units

Subrack

There are 14 slots in the front and 14 slots in the rear of a subrack. Front boards and back boards are installed in the slots in pairs. The SWU boards (front boards) and SWI boards (back boards) must be installed in slots 6 and 7. The UPBs are installed in slots 0-5 and slots 8-13.

Two SMM boards and two SDM boards are installed at the bottom of the subrack. The SMM boards are located in the front and the SDM boards are located in the rear of the subrack. They are installed in pairs.

Figure 2 and Figure 3 show the front view and rear view of an OSTA 2.0 subrack respectively.

Figure 2 Front view of a subrack
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1 Board slot 2 Fan tray (with air intake vents)
3 SMM slot -
Figure 3 Rear view of a subrack
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1 Air exhaust vent 2 RTM slot (Rear Transition Module slot)
3 Cable tray 4 Power entry module
5 SDM slot -

Boards

Table 1 provides a full listing of boards configured in a subrack.

Table 1 Functions of the boards
Physical Board Full Name Front or Back Board Remarks
UPB Universal Process Blade Front board

The UPB serves as a service processing unit in the subrack. Application software is installed on a UPB to implement data and service processing.

Each subrack can be configured with a maximum of 12 UPBs.

USI Universal Service Interface Unit Back board The USI serves as the interface board of the UPB. It provides interfaces for the UPB to communicate with external devices.
SWU Switching Unit Front board

The SWU board exchanges information within or outside the subrack through the Base plane and Fabric plane.

Each subrack is configured with two SWU boards working in load sharing mode.

SWI Switching Interface Unit Back board The SWI board serves as the interface board of the SWU board. It provides interfaces for the SWU board to communicate with external devices.
SMM Subrack Management Module Front board

The SMM is the management module of a subrack. The SMM manages all components in a subrack. It can provide functions such as device management, event management, asset management, power management, remote maintenance, configuration restoration, and resource-saving control.

Each subrack is configured with two SMM boards working in active/standby mode.

SDM Subrack Data Module Back board

The SDM board is the data module of the subrack. It uses eight DIP switches to define the subrack number. In addition, the SDM board stores the subrack profile and system performance specifications.

Each subrack is configured with two SDM boards working in active/standby mode.

PC Server

The CG9812 server is the core device of the CG9812 system and adopts two PC servers. Currently, you can use the following servers:
  • Two HP 380G6 servers
  • Or two DELL 2950 servers
  • Or two IBM x3650T servers
  • Or two IBM x3650 servers

Each server provides four network adapters:

two for communication with the GSN/UGW, one for the billing center, and one for the NMS.

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Please refer to the delivered servers. Because the servers are updated periodically, the type of the server described in this manual may be different from that of the server delivered. Take the HP 380G6 server as an example.

When the HP 380G6 server is used, the location and application of the network adapter in the CG9812 server is shown in Figure 4. For the convenience of description, the four network adapters are numbered as shown in Table 2.

Figure 4 Location and application of the CG9812 server network adapter(at the back of the HP 380G6 server chassis)
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Table 2 Description to the CG9812 server network adapters
NO Network adapter Description
1 Network adapter 0 To connect the 0# LAN Switch and the primary link of the GSN/UGW.
2 Network adapter 1 To connect the 1# LAN Switch and the secondary link of the GSN/UGW.
3 Network adapter 2 To connect the maintenance terminal (MT) and NMS.
4 Network adapter 3 To connect to the billing center.
Armetta  Diamond 
6 years 10 months ago
documentation very useful for my job
Alaul  Diamond 
6 years 10 months ago
Thanks for the Doc.........
user_2837311  Diamond 
2 years 10 months ago
useful document, thanks