Contents

6 MPLS L2VPN Configuration.. 6-1

6.1 Introduction. 6-3

6.1.1 MPLS L2VPN.. 6-3

6.1.2 CCC MPLS L2VPN.. 6-5

6.1.3 SVC MPLS L2VPN.. 6-6

6.1.4 Martini MPLS L2VPN.. 6-6

6.1.5 Kompella MPLS L2VPN.. 6-7

6.1.6 L2VPN Interworking. 6-7

6.1.7 Inter-AS MPLS L2VPN.. 6-9

6.1.8 References. 6-9

6.2 Configuring CCC MPLS L2VPN.. 6-10

6.2.1 Establishing the Configuration Task. 6-10

6.2.2 Enabling the MPLS L2VPN.. 6-11

6.2.3 Creating a CCC Local Connection. 6-11

6.2.4 Creating a CCC Remote Connection. 6-12

6.2.5 Checking the Configuration. 6-13

6.3 Configuring the SVC MPLS L2VPN.. 6-14

6.3.1 Establishing the Configuration Task. 6-14

6.3.2 Enabling MPLS L2VPN.. 6-15

6.3.3 Creating an SVC MPLS L2VPN Connection. 6-15

6.3.4 Checking the Configuration. 6-16

6.4 Configuring Martini MPLS L2VPN.. 6-17

6.4.1 Establishing the Configuration Task. 6-17

6.4.2 Enabling MPLS L2VPN.. 6-18

6.4.3 Creating a Martini MPLS L2VPN Connection. 6-18

6.4.4 Checking the Configuration. 6-19

6.5 Configuring Kompella MPLS L2VPN.. 6-20

6.5.1 Establishing the Configuration Task. 6-20

6.5.2 Enabling MPLS L2VPN.. 6-21

6.5.3 Configuring BGP/MPLS L2VPN.. 6-21

6.5.4 Configuring a VPN.. 6-22

6.5.5 Creating a CE Connection. 6-23

6.5.6 Checking the Configuration. 6-25

6.6 Configuring L2VPN IP-Interworking. 6-26

6.6.1 Establishing the Configuration Task. 6-26

6.6.2 Configuring CCC Local Connection IP-Interworking. 6-27

6.6.3 Configuring CCC Remote Connection IP-Interworking. 6-28

6.6.4 Configuring Martini L2VPN IP-Interworking. 6-28

6.6.5 Configuring Kompella L2VPN IP-Interworking. 6-29

6.6.6 (Optional) Configuring PE to Access CE Through Ethernet or VLAN.. 6-29

6.6.7 Checking the Configuration. 6-31

6.7 Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN.. 6-31

6.7.1 Establishing the Configuration Task. 6-31

6.7.2 Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN.. 6-32

6.7.3 Checking the Configuration. 6-33

6.8 Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Martini L2VPN.. 6-34

6.8.1 Establishing the Configuration Task. 6-34

6.8.2 Configuring Inter-AS Option A.. 6-35

6.8.3 Configuring Inter-AS Option C.. 6-35

6.8.4 Checking the Configuration. 6-39

6.9 Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Kompella L2VPN.. 6-40

6.9.1 Establishing the Configuration Task. 6-40

6.9.2 Configuring Labeled IPv4 Route Exchange on PE side. 6-41

6.9.3 Configuring Labeled IPv4 Route Exchange on ASBR side. 6-42

6.9.4 Creating a Routing Policy. 6-43

6.9.5 Applying the Routing Policy. 6-44

6.9.6 Establishing the MP-EBGP Peer Relationship Between PEs. 6-45

6.9.7 Configuring the VPN Instance and Create the CE Connection. 6-45

6.9.8 Checking the Configuration. 6-45

6.10 Maintaining MPLS L2VPN.. 6-47

6.10.1 Resetting BGP L2VPN Connections. 6-47

6.10.2 Debugging L2VPN.. 6-47

6.11 Configuration Examples. 6-48

6.11.1 Example for Configuring a CCC Local Connection. 6-48

6.11.2 Example for Configuring a CCC Remote Connection. 6-51

6.11.3 Example for Configuring SVC L2VPN.. 6-57

6.11.4 Example for Configuring Martini L2VPN.. 6-63

6.11.5 Example for Configuring a Kompella L2VPN Local Connection. 6-69

6.11.6 Example for Configuring a Kompella L2VPN Remote Connection. 6-72

6.11.7 Example for Establishing the Martini L2VPN by Using the MPLS TE Tunnel 6-77

6.11.8 Example for Configuring L2VPN Interworking Between Different Media: a CCC Remote Connection Between Ethernet and PPP. 6-87

6.11.9 Example for Interconnecting Ethernet with HDLC in the Martini Mode. 6-93

6.11.10 Example for Interconnecting VLAN with ATM in the Kompella Mode. 6-100

6.11.11 Example for Configuring L2VPN Internetworking (VLAN Interconnecting with PPP by Using the Remote Kompella Connection) 6-104

6.11.12 Examples for Configuring ACs of L2VPN IP-Interworking. 6-114

6.11.13 Example for Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN.. 6-118

6.11.14 Example for Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Martini L2VPN.. 6-128

6.11.15 Example for Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Kompella L2VPN.. 6-138

 


Figures

Figure 6-1 Networking diagram of the access of CE adopting ATM... 6-4

Figure 6-2 MPLS L2VPN model 6-4

Figure 6-3 MPLS L2VPN label processing. 6-5

Figure 6-4 Networking diagram of the CCC local connection. 6-48

Figure 6-5 Networking diagram of CCC remote connection. 6-52

Figure 6-6 Networking diagram of SVC MPLS L2VPN.. 6-58

Figure 6-7 Networking diagram of Martini L2VPN.. 6-63

Figure 6-8 Networking diagram of Kompella L2VPN local connection. 6-69

Figure 6-9 Networking diagram of Kompella L2VPN remote connection. 6-72

Figure 6-10 Establishment of Martini L2VPN by using the MPLS TE tunnel 6-77

Figure 6-11 Networking diagram of L2VPN internetworking (Ethernet interconnecting with PPP by using the CCC remote connection. 6-87

Figure 6-12 Networking diagram of IP-Interworking - Ethernet to HDLC.. 6-94

Figure 6-13 Networking diagram of IP-Interworking - VLAN to ATM... 6-101

Figure 6-14 Networking diagram of L2VPN internetworking - VLAN internetworking with PPP in remote Kompella connection  6-105

Figure 6-15 Networking diagram of PPP between CE and PE.. 6-115

Figure 6-16 Networking diagram of ATM primary interface between CE and PE.. 6-116

Figure 6-17 Networking diagram of ATM sub interface between CE and PE.. 6-117

Figure 6-18 Networking diagram for Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN.. 6-119

Figure 6-19 Networking diagram for inter-AS L2VPN.. 6-128

Figure 6-20 Configuring inter-AS Kompella VLL (Option C) 6-139

 


6 MPLS L2VPN Configuration

About This Chapter

The following table shows the contents of this chapter

Section

Description

6.1 Introduction

This section describes the basic principle of MPLS L2VPN.

6.2 Configuring CCC MPLS L2VPN

This section describes how to configure CCC MPLS L2VPN.

See:

l Example for Configuring a CCC Local Connection

l Example for Configuring a CCC Remote Connection

6.3 Configuring the SVC MPLS L2VPN

This section describes how to configure SVC MPLS L2VPN.

See Example for Configuring SVC L2VPN.

6.4 Configuring Martini MPLS L2VPN

This section describes how to configure Martini MPLS L2VPN.

See Example for Configuring Martini L2VPN.

6.5 Configuring Kompella MPLS L2VPN

This section describes how to configure Kompella MPLS L2VPN.

See Example for Configuring a Kompella L2VPN Local Connection.

6.6 Configuring L2VPN IP-Interworking

This section describes how to configure L2VPN IP-interworking.

See:

l Example for Configuring L2VPN Interworking Between Different Media: a CCC Remote Connection Between Ethernet and PPP

l Example for Interconnecting Ethernet with HDLC in the Martini Mode

l Example for Interconnecting VLAN with ATM in the Kompella Mode

l Examples for Configuring ACs of L2VPN IP-Interworking

6.7 Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN

This section describes how to configure the inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN.

See Example for Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN.

6.8 Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Martini L2VPN

This section describes how to configure the inter-AS multi-hop Martini L2VPN.

See Example for Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Martini L2VPN.

6.9 Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Kompella L2VPN

This section describes how to configure the inter-AS multi-hop Kompella L2VPN.

See Example for Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Kompella L2VPN.

6.10 Maintaining MPLS L2VPN

This section describes how to clear running information of the L2VPN, reset BGP connection and debug the L2VPN.

6.11 Configuration Examples

This section provides several configuration examples for the MPLS L2VPN.

 

6.1 Introduction

This section describes the following topics that you need to know before the configuration of MPLS L2VPN:

l   MPLS L2VPN

l   CCC MPLS L2VPN

l   SVC MPLS L2VPN

l   Martini MPLS L2VPN

l   Kompella MPLS L2VPN

l   L2VPN Interworking

l   Inter-AS MPLS L2VPN

l   References

6.1.1 MPLS L2VPN

Traditional VPN

Traditional VPNs are based on Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) or Frame Relay (FR) , where different VPNs can share the network structure of carriers. Traditional VPNs have the following disadvantages:

l   Dependence on special media (such as ATM or FR): The carriers must establish ATM networks or FR networks for ATM-based or FR-based VPNs across the country. This is a waste of network construction.

l   Complicated VPN structure: when a site is added to an existing VPN, it is necessary to modify the configuration of all the edge nodes that access the VPN site.

The MPLS L2VPN has evolved to overcome the disadvantages mentioned above.

MPLS L2VPN

The MPLS L2VPN provides Layer 2 VPN services on the MPLS network. It allows the establishment of L2VPNs on different media including ATM, FR, VLAN, Ethernet and PPP. At the same time, the MPLS network provides traditional IP services, MPLS L3VPN, traffic engineering and QoS.

The MPLS L2VPN transfers Layer 2 data of the user transparently on the MPLS network. The MPLS network is a Layer 2 switching network used to establish Layer 2 connections between nodes.

Consider ATM as an example. Configure an ATM virtual circuit for each Customer Edge device (CE) to communicate with another CE device through the MPLS network, similar to that through the ATM network.

In MPLS L2VPN, the concepts and the principles of CE, PE and P are similar to that in BGP/MPLS L3VPN.

Figure 6-1 Networking diagram of the access of CE adopting ATM

 

Comparison with BGP/MPLS VPN

Compared with BGP/MPLS VPN, MPLS L2VPN has the following advantages:

l   High scalability: The MPLS L2VPN establishes layer 2 link relationships. It does not import and manage the routing information of the user. It significantly reduces the load of the PE device and SP network. This enables the carrier to support more VPNs and more users.

l   Reliability and guaranteed security of private routing information: The MPLS L2VPN cannot obtain and process VPN routing information because it is not imported.

l   Support for network layer protocols such as IP, IPX, and SNA.

Basic Concepts of MPLS L2VPN

Figure 6-2 shows the model of MPLS L2VPN.

Figure 6-2 MPLS L2VPN model

 

The MPLS L2VPN also uses the label stack to transmit user packets in the MPLS network transparently.

l   Attachment Circuit (AC) : AC is an independent link or circuit that connects CE and PE. The AC interface may be a physical interface or a logical interface. The AC attributes include the encapsulation type, MTU and interface parameters of specified link type.

l   Virtual Circuit (VC) : It refers to a kind of logical connection between two PEs.

l   Tunnel (Network Tunnel) : It transmits the user data transparently.

Through the label stack, MPLS L2VPN can realize the transparent transmission of user datagram in an MPLS network.

l   Outer label: The label, which is also called tunnel label, is used in transferring packets from one PE to another.

l   Inner label: The label, which is also called VC label in MPLS L2VPN, is used to identify different links between VPNs. The PE on the receiver side transfers packets to the corresponding CE according to the VC label.

Figure 6-3 shows the packet label change in the forwarding process.

Figure 6-3 MPLS L2VPN label processing

 

Figure 6-3 shows the Layer 2 Protocol Data Unit (PDU) that is the link layer packet.

Here, T represents Tunnel label; V represents VC label; T' indicates that the outer label is substituted in the forwarding process.

Implementation of MPLS L2VPN

The Provider-provisioned Virtual Private Network (PPVPN) working group of the IETF has drafted various framework protocols. Two of the most important protocols are Martini draft and Kompella draft.

l   draft-martini-l2circuit-trans-mpls: uses LDP as the signaling protocol to transfer Layer 2 information and VC labels.

l   draft-kompella-ppvpn-l2vpn: uses BGP as the signaling protocol to transfer Layer 2 information and VC labels.

MPLS L2VPN can also be implemented through the static configuration of VC labels (such as CCC), without using signaling protocols.

The following sections describe the implementation of MPLS L2VPN.

6.1.2 CCC MPLS L2VPN

The Circuit Cross Connect (CCC) realizes the MPLS L2VPN by static configuration.

Unlike common MPLS L2VPN, the CCC adopts one label to transfer user data, so it uses the LSP exclusively. These LSPs can only be used to transfer the data of this CCC link, and cannot be used in other MPLS L2VPN links, BGP/MPLS VPN, or used to transfer common IP packets.

The two types of CCC connection are as follows:

l   Local connection: refers to the connection between two local CEs. The two CEs are connected to the same PE. Similar to a layer 2 switch, PE can directly transport packets without configuring static LSP.

l   Remote connection: refers to the connection between local CE and remote CE. The two CEs are on different PEs. In this case, static LSP configuration is needed to transfer packets from one PE to another PE. Configuration command is run on the PE to map the static LSP to the CCC connection.

6.1.3 SVC MPLS L2VPN

The SVC implements MPLS L2VPN through static configuration. The SVC transfers L2VPN information without using the signaling protocols. The VC label needs to be configured manually.

While creating the static L2VC connection of SVC, specify the tunnel type (LDP LSP, CR LDP).

The SVC does not support local connection.

The labels used by CCC and SVC range from 16 to 1023. They are in the same label space with those reserved for static LSPs.

6.1.4 Martini MPLS L2VPN

The Martini mode implements the MPLS L2VPN by setting up a point-to-point link. It takes LDP as the signaling protocol to transfer Layer 2 information and VC labels.

The Martini MPLS L2VPN adopts VC-type plus VC-ID to identify a VC between two CEs.

l   VC-type: indicates the type of the VC, such as ATM (atm-aal5-sdu, atm-trans-cell), PPP, Ethernet, FR and HDLC.

l   VC-ID: VC-ID of each VC in the same VC-type must be unique in the whole PE.

The PEs connecting two CEs exchange VC labels through LDP, and bind the corresponding CE by VC-ID.

A VC is set up when all the following conditions are satisfied:

l   The tunnel between the two PEs is successfully created.

l   The label exchange and the binding with CE are completed.

l   The state of the two interfaces of AC is Up.

In order to exchange VC labels between PEs, the Martini extends LDP by adding the FEC type in the VC FEC. For remote connection, the two PEs that exchange the VC label cannot be directly connected; therefore, the remote LDP session must be set up to convey the VC FEC and the VC label.

Martini supports inter-AS L2VPN in multi-hop mode. But it does not support local connection.

The Graceful Restart (GR) is a feature of Martini MPLS L2VPN. After the switchover of the router, the VC labels remain unchanged. During the switchover and after the switchover, the VC remains up.

After the switchover, if a different label is received from the peer through LDP, then the old label is deleted and the VC using this label is down.

6.1.5 Kompella MPLS L2VPN

Introduction

The Kompella mode takes BGP as the signaling protocol to transfer Layer 2 information and VC labels. It realizes the MPLS L2VPN by means of end-to-end (CE to CE) in the MPLS network.

The Kompella MPLS L2VPN is different from Martini. That is, it does not operate on the connection between the CEs directly. It allocates different VPNs in the whole SP network and encodes each CE in the VPN. Similar to BGP/MPLS VPN, the Kompella MPLS L2VPN uses VPN targets to identify different VPNs that make the VPN networking more flexible.

To connect two CEs, you need to configure the local CE ID and remote CE ID on the PE.

The Kompella supports both local and remote connections. It supports inter-AS L2VPN in the following two modes:

l   Multi-hop mode: adopts routes with BGP label.

l   VRF-to-VRF mode: ASBRs take each other as CEs.

Label Block

The Kompella MPLS L2VPN adopts the label block to allocate the labels. Through the label blocks, labels can be allocated to connections at the same time.

Users specify the local CE range that indicates the number of CEs that can be connected with this CE. The PE assigns a label block for this CE. The size of the label block is equal to the CE range. In this manner, the users can reserve some extra labels for the VPN for future use. On a short term basis, it is a waste of label resources, but it reduces the workload of VPN deployment and configuration in expansion.

Suppose an enterprise VPN has 10 CEs and the number may increase to 20 due to its service expansion in future. The CE range of each CE can be set to 20 to meet future expansion. If the VPN adds nodes in the future, it is necessary to modify the configuration of the PE that is directly connected with the new CE, without modifying other PEs.

6.1.6 L2VPN Interworking

Introduction

If the link types of CEs at the two ends of an L2VPN are different, use the L2VPN interworking feature.

According to the recommendation in draft-kompella-ppvpn-l2vpn, IP-interworking should be used as the encapsulation type of the L2VPN interface on the PE to set up an L2VPN connection. In this case, Layer 3 data (IP packets) can be delivered transparently across the MPLS network.

When the L2VPN interworking feature is adopted,

l   You need to encapsulate the L2VPN interface on the PE at the two ends with IP-interworking.

l   The PE begins to establish the L2VPN connection after the physical status of the interfaces goes up.

l   The PE allows L2VPN forwarding once the L2VPN connection is established. In this case, the system considers the physical link for transparent transmission available irrespective of whether the status of the link layer protocol is up or down.

l   After the status of both the AC and L2VPN tunnel goes up, the CEs at the two ends can transmit and receive IP packets.

After the L2VPN connection is established, the IP packets processing is as follows:

l   On receiving an IP packet from the CE, the PE decapsulates the link layer packet and delivers the IP packet to the MPLS network.

l   The IP packet is transparently transported to the peer PE across the MPLS network.

l   The peer PE re-encapsulates the IP packet according to its own link layer protocol type, and then sends the encapsulated packet to the CE connected with it.

l   The link layer control packet sent by the CE is processed by the PE and does not enter the MPLS network.

l   All non-IP packets (such as MPLS and IPX packets) are discarded and none of them is transferred across the MPLS network.

Processing of Different Link Layer Protocols

Unless otherwise stated, the PE in the CE-PE configuration refers to the local PE.

l   Ethernet and VLAN

The following interfaces used in L2VPN can be encapsulated with IP-interworking:

       Interfaces and sub-interfaces of Ethernet type

       Interfaces and sub-interfaces of Gigabit Ethernet type

       Eth-Trunk interface

Note that:

       There is no need to assign an IP address to the Ethernet interface of the PE. No route is generated even if an IP address has been assigned.

       The Ethernet interface of the PE processes only the ARP packets and the IP packets

       The PE does not update the dynamic MAC entry when receiving IP packets from the CE.

The ARP processing is as follows:

       The ARP entries of the L2VPN Ethernet interface with IP-interworking are different from those of the L2VPN Ethernet interface without IP-interworking.

       The L2VPN incoming interface with IP-interworking on the PE uses the MAC address of the PE to respond to the ARP request packet from the CE irrespective of the destination address of the packet.

       An Ethernet interface or sub interface of the PE can be connected only with one CE and cannot be connected with multiple CEs or other devices through a hub or a LAN switch. Otherwise, the PE may learn useless MAC addresses, resulting in forwarding failure.

l   PPP

       The L2VPN supports two types of authentication protocols, Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) and Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP). The authentication mode can be local, RADIUS or HWTACACS.

       The L2VPN interworking supports the STAC-LZS compression. It does not support the IPHC and VJ compression.

       The IP address of PE and CE can be assigned y PE or by CE. The address assignment mechanism is the same as that in ordinary situations.

       The L2VPN interworking supports transparent transmission of IP packets from the local CE to the remote CE. It does not support transparent transmission of MPLS, ISIS, and IPX packets. If these protocols are configured on the interface, the system still negotiates their NCPs but does not forward their data packets.

It is recommended to assign the IP address to the PE through CE for PPP links. This can avoid address collision on the PE, and is also convenient for the deployment of the network.

6.1.7 Inter-AS MPLS L2VPN

The realization of an inter-AS MPLS L2VPN depends on the actual environment. In CCC mode, the label is of single layer. Therefore, the inter-AS can be realized after the static LSP is set up between the ASBRs.

Martini and Kompella modes can realize the inter-AS Option A (VRF-to-VRF) . In the L2VPN networking, the link type between the ASBRs and that of the VC must be the same. In the inter-AS Option A, each ASBR must reserve a sub-interface for each inter-AS VC. If the number of the inter-AS VCs is small, the Option A can be adopted. Compared with the L3VPN, the inter-AS Option A of the L2VPN consume more resources.

Option B requires the switching of both the inner label and the outer label on the ASBR. Therefore, Option B is not suitable for the L2VPN.

Option C is a better solution.  The SP network devices need only set up the outer tunnel on the PEs of different ASs. The ASBR needs not maintain information about the inter-AS L2VPN. The ASBR also needs not reserve interfaces for the inter-AS L2VPN. The L2VPN information is exchanged only between PEs. Thus, the resources consumption decreases.

6.1.8 References

For details of L2VPN, refer to the following documents.

Document No.

Description

draft-ietf-l2vpn-l2-framework-05

Framework for Layer 2 Virtual Private Networks (L2VPNs)

draft-ietf-l2vpn-requirements-02

Service Requirements for Layer-2 Provider Provisioned Virtual Private Networks

draft-ietf-l2vpn-signaling-02

Provisioning Models and Endpoint Identifiers in L2VPN Signaling

draft-ietf-l2vpn-ipls-00

IP-Only LAN Service (IPLS)

draft-kompella-ppvpn-l2vpn-03

Layer 2 VPNs Over Tunnels

 

6.2 Configuring CCC MPLS L2VPN

6.2.1 Establishing the Configuration Task

Applicable Environment

CCC is suitable for the small-scale MPLS network with simple topology. CCC needs manual configuration and does not need the signaling negotiation and the exchange of control packets. CCC features little resources consumption. However, CCC is inconvenient to maintain and has little extensibility.

You need to configure the PE interface connected to CE (namely the AC interface) before configuring a Circuit Cross Connect (CCC). Configuration of the sub-interface is required if the link type is VLAN. If the link type is ATM, you need to configure the virtual circuit.

Both the ATM sub interface and ATM main interface can serve as the CE interface in MPLS L2VPN.

l  MPLS L2VPN supports Ethernet interface or sub interface, GE interface or sub interface, serial interface, POS interface and ATM interface or sub interfaces.

l  The VLAN can use only the Ethernet sub interface as the CE interface. If the Ethernet main interface serves as the CE interface, the system defaults its encapsulation type as Ethernet, rather than VLAN.

In MPLS L2VPN, configure only one virtual circuit for each sub interface. If there are two or more virtual circuits, only the first one is valid.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring CCC L2VPN, you need to complete the following tasks:

l   Configuring basic MPLS capability for the MPLS backbone network (PE or P)

l   Configuring a sub interface for the VLAN access or configuring a VC for the ATM access

For the configuration of VLAN sub-interface and ATM Virtual Channel, refer to the chapter "VLAN Configuration" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - LAN Access and MAN Access and the chapter "ATM Configuration" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - WAN Access.

Data Preparations

To configure CCC L2VPN, you need the following data.

No.

Data

1

Name of the CCC connection

2

Connection type: local connection or remote connection

3

CCC local connection: the type and number of the incoming and outgoing interfaces

4

CCC remote connection: the type and number of the incoming interface, next hop address or the type and number of outgoing interface

5

CCC remote connection: the in-label and out-label values of LSRs

 

Choose Creating a CCC Local Connection or Creating a CCC Remote Connection according to the required connection type.

Configuration Procedures

No.

Procedure

1

Enabling the MPLS L2VPN

2

Creating a CCC Local Connection

3

Creating a CCC Remote Connection

4

Checking the Configuration

 

6.2.2 Enabling the MPLS L2VPN

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn

The MPLS L2VPN is configured.

----End

6.2.3 Creating a CCC Local Connection

Do as follows on the PEs.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

ccc ccc-connection-name interface interface-type interface-number out-interface interface-type interface-number

A CCC local connection is created.

The CCC local connection is bidirectional, and thus only one connection is required.

----End

The same interface cannot serve as the Attachment Circuit (AC) interface of L3VPN and the AC interface of L3VPN at the same time. When an interface is bound with L2VPN, the Layer 3 features such as IP address and routing protocol configured on the interface become invalid. When an interface is bound with L2VPN and L3VPN at the same time, only the L2VPN can be used. After the L2VPN is deleted, the bound L3VPN can then become available.

After the configuration mentioned above on the PE, a CCC local connection is created.

6.2.4 Creating a CCC Remote Connection

Configuring the PE

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

ccc ccc-connection-name interface interface-type interface-number in-label in-label-value out-label out-label-value { nexthop ip-address | out-interface interface-type interface-number } [ control-word | no-control-word ]

A CCC remote connection is configured.

An interface cannot serve as an L2VPN AC interface and L3VPN AC interface at the same time. After an interface is bound to an L2VPN, the Layer 3 features such as the IP address and routing protocol configured on this interface become invalid. If an interface is bound to an L2VPN and an L3VPN at the same, only the L2VPN is available. After the L2VPN is deleted, the bound L3VPN becomes available.

When configuring PE and P, if the outgoing interface is of non-Point-to-Point (P2P) type (such as Ethernet, ATM and FR), you must specify its next hop address.

----End

In the NE40, each CCC remote connection needs to be configured with an inner label and an outer label rather than two static LSPs. The in-label is exclusively occupied by this CCC connection.

Configuring P

Do as follows on the Ps that the VC passes through.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

static-lsp transit lsp-name incoming-interface interface-type interface-number in-label in-label { nexthop next-hop-addr | outgoing-interface interface-type interface-number } out-label out-label

The P device is configured as a transit LSR of the static LSP.

----End

It is not necessary to configure static LSPs on the PEs for the CCC connection. You should configure a bidirectional transit static LSP on all the P routers between the PEs. These LSPs are used to transfer the data of this CCC exclusively. Furthermore, MPLS L2VPN need not be enabled on the P routers.

6.2.5 Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

Action

Command

Check the CCC connection information.

display ccc [ ccc-name | type { local | remote } ]

Check the interface information of the CCC connection.

display l2vpn ccc-interface vc-type ccc [ up | down ]

 

Run the display ccc command. You can view the CCC VC status is Up. For example:

<Quidway> display ccc

total  ccc vc : 1

local  ccc vc : 1,  1 up

remote ccc vc : 0,  0 up

name: ce1-ce2, type: local, state: up,

intf1: Pos1/0/0 (up),   intf2: Pos2/0/0 (up)

<Quidway> display ccc

total  ccc vc : 1

local  ccc vc : 0,  0 up

remote ccc vc : 1,  1 up

name: ce2-ce1, type: remote, state: up,

intf: Pos2/0/0 (up), in-label: 201 , out-label: 101 , out-interface : Pos1/0/0

Run the display l2vpn ccc-interface vc-type ccc command. You can view the VC type is CCC and the VC status is Up. For example:

<Quidway> display l2vpn ccc-interface vc-type all

Total ccc-interface of CCC VC: 1

up (1), down (0)

Interface  Encap Type  State   VC Type

Pos1/0/0   ppp           up      CCC

6.3 Configuring the SVC MPLS L2VPN

6.3.1 Establishing the Configuration Task

Applicable Environment

The setup process of the SVC outer label (public network tunnel) is the same as that of the Martini. Inner label is manually specified, without the signaling transmission of the VC label, during the VC configuration.

The SVC does not use signaling protocols to transfer L2VPN information. Packets are transported between the PEs through tunnels.

The SVC supports multiple types of tunnels such as LDP LSP, CR-LSP. By default, the LDP LSP tunnel is used.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring SVC MPLS L2VPN, you need to complete the following tasks:

l   Configuring the static route or IGP for the MPLS backbone network (PE and P) to implement IP connectivity

l   Enabling the MPLS for PEs

l   Establishing a tunnel between PEs according to the tunnel policy

l   Configuring the sub interface for the VLAN access of CE or configuring the VC for the ATM access of CE

For the configuration of VLAN sub interface and ATM virtual channel, refer to the chapter "VLAN Configuration" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - LAN Access and MAN Access and the chapter "ATM Configuration" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - WAN Access.

Data Preparation

To configure the SVC MPLS L2VPN, you need the following data.

No.

Data

1

Type and number of the interface accessing CE

2

Destination LSR ID of SVC

3

In-label and out-label values of L2VPN connection

4

Tunnel policy of the SVC

 

Configuration Procedures

No.

Procedure

1

Enabling MPLS L2VPN

2

Creating an SVC MPLS L2VPN Connection

3

Checking the Configuration

 

6.3.2 Enabling MPLS L2VPN

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn

The MPLS L2VPN is enabled.

----End

6.3.3 Creating an SVC MPLS L2VPN Connection

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

interface interface-type interface-number

The view of the interface accessing CE is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

undo shutdown

The interface is started.

                               Step 4     Run:

mpls static-l2vc destination destination-router-id transmit-vpn-label transmit-label-value receive-vpn-label receive-label-value [ tunnel-policy policy-name | [ control-word | no-control-word ] | [ raw | tagged | ip-interworking ] ] *

An SVC MPLS L2VPN connection is created.

l  An interface cannot serve as an L2VPN AC interface and L3VPN AC interface at the same time. After an interface is bound to an L2VPN, the Layer 3 features such as the IP address and routing protocol configured on this interface become invalid. If an interface is bound to an L2VPN and an L3VPN at the same, only the L2VPN is available. After the L2VPN is deleted, the bound L3VPN becomes available.

l  The parameters raw and tagged are needed only for the Ethernet link.

l  In the case of the non-L2VPN internetworking, the link types of VCs on both ends in the same L2VPN must be the same.

----End

6.3.4 Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

Action

Command

Check the SVC L2VPN connection information on the PE.

display mpls static-l2vc [ interface interface-type interface-number ]

Check the interface information of the SVC connections in Up/Down state.

display l2vpn ccc-interface vc-type static-l2vc { up | down }

 

Run the display mpls static-l2vc command. You can view the VC status is Up. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls static-l2vc

Total svc connections:  1,  1 up,  0 down

 

 *Client Interface     : Pos1/0/0 is up

  AC Status            : up

  VC State             : up

  VC ID                : 0

  VC Type              : ppp

  Destination          : 3.3.3.9

  Transmit VC Label    : 100

  Receive VC Label     : 200

  Control Word         : Disable

  VCCV Capability      : Disable

  Tunnel Policy Name   : --

  Traffic Behavior     : --

  PW Template Name     : --

  Create time          : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 38 seconds

  UP time              : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 11 seconds

  Last change time     : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 11 seconds

Run the display l2vpn ccc-interface vc-type static-l2vc up command. You can view the VC type is static-vc and the VC status is Up. For example:

<Quidway> display l2vpn ccc-interface vc-type up

Total ccc-interface of SVC VC: 1

up (1), down (0)

Interface  Encap Type  State   VC Type

Pos1/0/0   ppp           up      static-vc

6.4 Configuring Martini MPLS L2VPN

6.4.1 Establishing the Configuration Task

Applicable Environment

In Martini mode, double-layer labels are adopted. The inner label uses the extended LDP as the signaling protocol to transmit the Layer 2 information and the VC label.

In Martini mode, an LSP between two PEs can be shared by multiple VCs. Information about the VC label and LSP is stored only on the PE devices. The P devices do not store any Layer 2 VPN information. Therefore, Martini mode features excellent extensibility. When a new VC is needed, you only need to configure a unidirectional VC on each PE device of the two ends. The network operation is not affected.

Compared with Kompella mode, Martini mode uses LDP rather than BGP as the signaling protocol, which ensures Martini mode to be independent of the refresh mechanism. Therefore, Martini mode can feel the faults swiftly.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring Martini MPLS L2VPN, you need to complete the following tasks:

l   Configuring the static route or IGP for the MPLS backbone network (PE or P) to implement IP connectivity

l   Enabling MPLS for PEs

l   Establishing an LDP session between PEs which are connected directly, or establishing a remote LDP session between PEs which are connected indirectly

l   Establishing a tunnel between PEs according to the tunnel policy

l   Configuring a sub interface for the VLAN access of CE and configuring VC for the ATM access of CE

For the configuration of VLAN sub interface and ATM virtual channel, refer to the chapter "VLAN Configuration" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - LAN Access and MAN Access and the chapter "ATM Configuration" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - WAN Access.

Data Preparation

To configure Martini MPLS L2VPN, you need the following data.

No.

Data

1

Type and number of the interface accessing CE

2

Destination address and VC ID of L2VC

3

Tunnel policy

 

Configuration Procedures

No.

Procedure

1

Enabling MPLS L2VPN

2

Creating a Martini MPLS L2VPN Connection

3

Checking the Configuration

 

6.4.2 Enabling MPLS L2VPN

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn

The MPLS L2VPN is enabled.

----End

6.4.3 Creating a Martini MPLS L2VPN Connection

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn default martini

The mode is switched to Martini.

                               Step 3     Run:

interface interface-type interface-number

The view of the interface accessing CE is displayed.

                               Step 4     Run:

undo shutdown

The interface is started.

                               Step 5     Run:

mpls l2vc dest-ip-addr vc-id [ [ control-word | no-control-word ] | [ raw | tagged ] | tunnel-policy policy-name ] *

A Martini MPLS L2VPN connection is created.

l  An interface cannot serve as an L2VPN AC interface and L3VPN AC interface at the same time. After an interface is bound to an L2VPN, the Layer 3 features such as the IP address and routing protocol configured on this interface become invalid. If an interface is bound to an L2VPN and an L3VPN at the same, only the L2VPN is available. After the L2VPN is deleted, the bound L3VPN becomes available.

l  The parameters raw and tagged are needed only for the Ethernet link.

l  In the case of the non-L2VPN internetworking, the link types of the VCs on both ends in the same L2VPN must be the same.

----End

l  By default, the system adopts the PWE3 mode. The PWE3 mode supports the Notification packet while the Martini mode does not support the Notification packet. For the detail about the Notification packet, refer to the chapter of "PWE3 Configuration."

l  If the opposite CE does not support the Notification packet, use the mpls l2vpn default martini command to switch the system mode to Martini.

Martini MPLS L2VPN requires that the VC ID of the same encapsulation type on a PE must be unique. The modification of encapsulation might cause VC ID collision.

For example, the interfaces POS 1/0/0 and POS 2/0/0 are encapsulated in HDLC and PPP separately and each creates an LDP connection with VC ID being 1. If you modify the link layer encapsulation type of POS 2/0/0 to HDLC: there are two CCC-HDLC encapsulated LDP connections. The VC IDs of both are 1. To avoid collision, the LDP connection on POS 2/0/0 is deleted automatically.

6.4.4 Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

Action

Command

Check the Martini L2VPN connection information on local PE.

display mpls l2vc [ vc-id | interface interface-type interface-number ]

Or check the peer Martini L2VPN connection information on local PE.

display mpls l2vc remote-info [ vc-id ]

 

Run the display mpls l2vc command. You can view the "Destination" is the peer address of the specified VC, and the "VC state" is Up. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls l2vc

Total ldp vc : 1     1 up       0 down

 

 *Client Interface     : GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

  Session State        : up

  AC Status            : up

  VC State             : up

  VC ID                : 101

  VC Type              : vlan

  Destination          : 3.3.3.9

  Local VC Label       : 1025

  Remote VC Label      : 1024

  Control Word         : Disable

  Local VC MTU         : 1500

  Remote VC MTU        : 1500

  Tunnel Policy Name   : --

  Traffic Behavior Name: --

  PW Template Name     : --

  Create time          : 0 days, 0 hours, 3 minutes, 14 seconds

  UP time              : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 48 seconds

  Last change time     : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 48 seconds

Run the display mpls l2vc remote-info command. You can view the "Peer Addr" is the peer address of the specified VC. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls l2vc remote-info

Total remote ldp vc : 1

Transport  Group  Peer             Remote         Remote      C   MTU/   N    S

VC ID       ID     Addr              Encap          VC Label   Bit CELLS Bit Bit

100          0      3.3.3.9          vlan           17408       0   1500   1   0

6.5 Configuring Kompella MPLS L2VPN

6.5.1 Establishing the Configuration Task

Applicable Environment

The Kompella MPLS L2VPN uses BGP as the signaling protocol to transfer L2VPN information between PEs.

Similar to BGP/MPLS VPN, Kompella mode uses the VPN target to control the receiving and sending of the VPN routes. This brings about great flexibility.

The Kompella mode adopts the label block. Each CE is allocated with a label block that decides this CE can set up how many connections with other CEs. This permits some additional label to the VPN for the future extensibility. The PEs calculate the inner label according to the label block.

The Kompella mode supports the local and the remote connection, the VRF-to-VRF, and multi-hop.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring Kompella MPLS L2VPN, complete the following tasks:

l   Configuring the static route or IGP for the MPLS backbone network (PE and P) to implement IP connectivity

l   Enabling MPLS for the PE and P

l   Establishing a tunnel between PEs according to the tunnel policy

For the local connection, the IGP and LDP configurations are not required.

Data Preparation

To configure Kompella MPLS L2VPN, you need the following data.

No.

Data

1

AS number of local PE and peer PE

2

Name, RD and VPN-Target of the L2VPN connection

3

CE name, CE ID and CE range

4

CE offset

 

Configuration Procedures

No.

Procedure

1

Enabling MPLS L2VPN

2

Configuring BGP/MPLS L2VPN

3

Configuring a VPN

4

Creating a CE Connection

5

Checking the Configuration

 

If you want to set up the local connection, Configuring BGP/MPLS L2VPN is optional.

6.5.2 Enabling MPLS L2VPN

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn

The MPLS L2VPN is enabled.

----End

6.5.3 Configuring BGP/MPLS L2VPN

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

bgp as-number

The BGP view is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

peer peer-address as-number as-number

A remote PE is specified as the peer.

                               Step 4     Run:

peer peer-address connect-interface loopback interface-number

An interface to create the TCP connection is specified.

The loopback interface address with 32-bit mask must be used to establish the MP-IBGP peer relationship between the PEs. This can avoid a situation of packets being unable to find the correct route due to route aggregation. The route to the loopback interface is advertised to the peer PE through IGP on the MPLS backbone network.

                               Step 5     Run:

l2vpn-family

The BGP L2VPN address family view is displayed.

                               Step 6     Run:

peer peer-address enable

The specified peer is enabled.

----End

For local connection, the configuration in this section is not required.

6.5.4 Configuring a VPN

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn vpn-name encapsulation { atm-aal5-sdu | ethernet | fr | hdlc | ppp | vlan } [ control-word | no-control-word ]

A VPN is created and the MPLS L2VPN view is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

route-distinguisher route-distinguisher

The RD for L2VPN is configured.

                               Step 4     (Optional) Run:

mtu mtu-value

The Layer 2 MTU is set for the VPN.

                               Step 5     (Optional) Run:

ignore-mtu-match

The MTU matching check is ignored.

                               Step 6     Run:

vpn-target vpn-target &<1-16> [ both | export-extcommunity | import-extcommunity ]

The VPN target is configured.

----End

The MTU for the VPN should be consistent in the whole network. If the MTU of the same VPN on two PEs differs, these two PEs cannot exchange reachability information and cannot set up connections. By default, the MTU in the L2VPN view is 1500 bytes.

Devices of some manufacturers do not support the MTU matching check in the L2VPN instance. When Huawei products are connected with non-Huawei products in Kompella mode, you can choose one of the following configurations on the NE40:

l   Configure the MTU of the L2VPN on the PE to be the same as that of non-Huawei products.

l   Use the ignore-mtu-match command to ignore the MTU matching check.

If the encapsulation type is FR, the Data Link Connection Identifier (DLCI) of CEs at the two ends must be consistent. One of these two ends must act as Data Terminal Equipment (DTE).

The Kompella MPLS L2VPN must create an L2VPN instance on the PE for each directly connected CE. When L2VPN is created, the encapsulation type must be consistent with that of CCC on the CE interface.

The configuration and usage of the VPN target and RD are completely the same as that of the BGP/MPLS VPN. It means that the configuration and usage of the VPN target and RD are omitted here except one point: For Kompella MPLS L2VPN, you must configure RD before configuring the other commands. The RD cannot be changed once it is configured. The only way to modify RD is to delete this MPLS L2VPN and re-create one.

6.5.5 Creating a CE Connection

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn l2vpn-name

The MPLS-L2VPN view is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

ce ce-name id ce-id [ range ce-range ] [ default-offset ce-offset ]

A CE is specified and the MPLS-L2VPN-CE view is displayed.

                               Step 4     Run:

connection [ ce-offset id ] interface interface-type interface-number [ tunnel-policy policy-name ] [ raw | tagged ]

A CE connection is created.

l  An interface cannot serve as an L2VPN AC interface and L3VPN AC interface at the same time. After an interface is bound to an L2VPN, the Layer 3 features such as the IP address and routing protocol configured on this interface become invalid. If an interface is bound to an L2VPN and an L3VPN at the same, only the L2VPN is available. After the L2VPN is deleted, the bound L3VPN becomes available.

l  All Kompella L2VPN instances and VPLS VSI instances of one device share one label block; therefore, the sum of the ranges of all Kompella L2VPN instances and VPLS VSI instances cannot exceed the size of the label block. Otherwise, the system prompts that the labels cannot be obtained because the required labels exceed the upper limit; thus, allocation of a site ID to a VSI or creation of a CE fails.

l  Parameters raw and tagged can be specified only for Ethernet links to change the VC encapsulation type to Etherenet or VLAN.

l  In the case of the non-L2VPN internetworking, the link types of VCs on both ends in the same L2VPN must be the same.

----End

Before configuring CE on PE, you should configure RD for the VPN instance.

The CE ID is used to uniquely identify a CE in a VPN. It is recommended to encode CE ID with continuous numbers starting from 1.

The CE range indicates the maximum number of CEs that this CE can connect with. According to the prediction of the VPN expansion, configure the CE range more than what is required. This can reduce the configuration modification when CE devices are added in the VPN in future.

You can increase only the CE range. For example, if the original CE range is 10, you can increase it to 20, but cannot reduce it to 5. When the CE range is modified, PE allocates another 10-label block instead of releasing the original label block to allocate a 20-label block. Therefore, the service will not be interrupted by the modification of the CE range. The only way to reduce the CE range is to delete this CE and re-create one.

The CE offset is the CE ID of the other local or remote CE that is connected with this CE.

Default-offset is the defaulted CE offset. You can specify default-offset as 0 or 1. Its default value is 0. If default-offset is 1, you cannot change it to 0.

If the default-offset is 0, the CE offset must be less than the CE range. If the default-offset is 1, the CE offset must be less than or the same as that of the CE range.

For the remote connection, the CE offset and the CE ID of the remote CE must be the same. Otherwise, the connection cannot be set up. For the local connection between two CEs, a offset of a CE is the CE ID of the other CE.

If the CE offset is not designated:

l   For the first connection of this CE, the CE offset is the default value of default-offset.

l   For other connections, the CE offset is that of the former connection plus 1. If the CE offset of the former connection plus 1 is equal to this CE ID, then the CE offset is that of the former connection plus 2.

If CE ID starting from 1 is numbered in an incremental sequence and the connection is configured according to this sequence, then the ce-offset parameters of most of the connections can use the default ones. This simplifies the configuration.

6.5.6 Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

Action

Command

Check the BGP information of the Kompella MPLS L2VPN.

display bgp l2vpn { all | group [ group-name ] | peer [ [ ip-address ] verbose ] | route-distinguisher rd [ ce-id ce-id [ label-offset label-offset ] ] }

Check the connection information of the Kompella MPLS L2VPN.

display mpls l2vpn connection [ [ vpn-name [ remote-ce ce-offset | down | up | verbose ] ] | summary | [ interface interface-type interface-number ] ]

Check the L2VPN information on PE.

display mpls l2vpn [ vpn-name [ local-ce | remote-ce ] ]

Check the route target list of the L2VPN.

display mpls l2vpn { export-route-target-list | import-route-target-list }

 

Run the display mpls l2vc command. You can view the "Destination" is the peer address of the specified VC, and the "route-distinguisher" is correctly configured. It means the label allocation is complete. For example:

<Quidway> display bgp l2vpn all

BGP Local router ID : 2.2.2.9, local AS number : 100

Origin codes:i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

bgp.l2vpn: 1 destination

Route Distinguisher: 100:1

CE ID   Label Offset   Label Base    nexthop         pref      as-path

4       0                132096         3.3.3.9         100   

Run the display mpls l2vpn connection command. You can view the "VPN name" is correctly configured, the "Status" is Up, and the "route-distinguisher" is correctly configured. For example:

[Quidway] display mpls l2vpn connection

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

VPN name: vpn1,

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

  CE name: ce1, id: 1,

  Rid type status peer-id         route-distinguisher   intf

  2   rmt  up     3.3.3.9         100:1                 Pos1/0/0

Run the display mpls l2vpn [ vpn-name [ local-ce | remote-ce ] ] command. You can view the "route-distinguisher" and the route target of the L2VPN are correctly configured. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls l2vpn vpn1

VPN name: vpn1, encap type: interworking, local ce number(s): 1, remote ce number(s): 1

route distinguisher: 100:1, MTU: 128

import vpn target: 1:1,

export vpn target: 1:1,

 

remote vpn site(s) :

no.  remote-pe-id    route-distinguisher

1    3.3.3.9           100:1

Run the display mpls l2vpn { export-route-target-list | import-route-target-list } command. You can view the route target of the L2VPN is correctly configured. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls l2vpn import-route-target-list

import vpn target list: 744:7  745:7  746:7  888:8

<Quidway> display mpls l2vpn export-route-target-list

export vpn target list: 755:7  888:8

6.6 Configuring L2VPN IP-Interworking

6.6.1 Establishing the Configuration Task

Applicable Environment

If the link types of CEs at the two ends of an L2VPN are different, you need to use the L2VPN interworking feature.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring L2VPN interworking, complete the following tasks:

l   Configuring the static route or IGP for the MPLS backbone network (PE or P) to implement IP connectivity

l   Enabling the MPLS for the PE and P

l   Establishing a tunnel between PEs according to the tunnel policy if it is a remote connection

l   For Martini mode, establishing an LDP session between PEs that are connected directly, or establishing a remote LDP session between PEs that are not connected directly

l   For Kompella mode, establishing the BGP peering session between PEs

l   Configuring a sub-interface if the CE is connected to the PE through VLAN or configuring a VC if the CE is connected to the PE through ATM

For configuration of VLAN sub interface and ATM virtual channel, refer to the chapter "VLAN Configuration" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - LAN Access and MAN Access and the chapter "ATM Configuration" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - WAN Access.

Data Preparation

To configure L2VPN interworking, you need the following data.

No.

Data

1

The media for access at two ends

2

The MAC address of CE for Ethernet or VLAN access

 

Other required data is the same as that for the CCC local connection, Martini MPLS L2VPN or Kompella MPLS L2VPN.

Configuration Procedures

No.

Procedure

1

Configuring CCC Local Connection IP-Interworking

2

Configuring CCC Remote Connection IP-Interworking

3

Configuring Martini L2VPN IP-Interworking

4

Configuring Kompella L2VPN IP-Interworking

5

(Optional) Configuring PE to Access CE Through Ethernet or VLAN

6

Checking the Configuration

 

l  In the configuration mentioned above, procedures 1, 2, 3and 4 are optional. Choose one of them to configure as needed.

l  In procedure 5, perform the configuration according to the type of CE access interface.

6.6.2 Configuring CCC Local Connection IP-Interworking

Do as follows on the local PEs.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn

The MPLS L2VPN is enabled.

                               Step 3     Run

ccc ip-interworking ccc-connection-name interface interface-type interface-number out-interface interface-type interface-number

A CCC local connection is created.

----End

6.6.3 Configuring CCC Remote Connection IP-Interworking

Do as follows on the local PEs.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn

The MPLS L2VPN is enabled.

                               Step 3     Run

ccc ip-interworking ccc-connection-name interface interface-type interface-number in-label in-label-value out-label out-label-value { nexthop ip-address | out-interface interface-type interface-number } [ control-word | no-control-word ]

A CCC remote connection is created.

----End

6.6.4 Configuring Martini L2VPN IP-Interworking

Do as follows on the local PEs.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn

The MPLS L2VPN is enabled.

                               Step 3     Run:

mpls l2vpn default martini

The mode is switched to Martini.

                               Step 4     Run:

interface interface-type interface-number

The view of the interface accessing the CE is displayed.

                               Step 5     Run:

undo shutdown

The interface is started.

                               Step 6     Run:

mpls l2vc dest-ip-addr vc-id [ tunnel-policy policy-name ] [ control-word | no-control-word ] ip-interworking

A Martini MPLS L2VPN connection is created.

----End

l  By default, PWE3 mode is used. PWE3 mode supports Notification packets to negotiate the PW status information.

l  Martini mode does not support Notification packets. For description about Notification packets, refer to the chapter "PWE3 Configuration."

l  If the peer CE does not support Notification packets, use the mpls l2vpn default martini command to switch the system mode to Martini.

6.6.5 Configuring Kompella L2VPN IP-Interworking

Do as follows on the local PEs.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls l2vpn

The MPLS L2VPN is enabled.

                               Step 3     Run

mpls l2vpn l2vpn-name encapsulation ip-interworking [ control-word | no-control-word ]

A VPN is created and the MPLS-L2VPN view is displayed.

----End

After the configuration mentioned above, you also need to configure BGP with the L2VPN capacity, VPN and CE connection. These configurations are the same as those for common Kompella L2VPN.

For details, see Configuring Kompella MPLS L2VPN.

6.6.6 (Optional) Configuring PE to Access CE Through Ethernet or VLAN

Do as follows on the local PEs.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

interface interface-type interface-number

The view of the interface accessing the CE is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

undo shutdown

The interface is started.

                               Step 4     Choose one of the following commands.

l   Run the local-ce ip ip-address command to configure an IP address for the CE interface.

l   Run the local-ce mac mac-address command to specify the MAC address of the local CE interface.

                               Step 5     (Optional) Run:

local-ce mac broadcast

Broadcast is enabled on the interface connected to the local CE.

                               Step 6     (Optional) Run:

ip address remote-ip-address

The IP address of the remote CE is assigned to the interface connected to the local CE.

----End

This section discusses the configuration required when the CE accesses the PE through Ethernet or VLAN. The configuration for other link layer protocols is simple. For details, see the examples for L2VPN interworking configuration in Configuration Examples.

All IP packets received from the remote PE are discarded if all the following conditions are satisfied:

l   The L2VPN Ethernet interface or sub interface is IP-interworking encapsulated on the PE.

l   The MAC address of the local CE cannot be learned (regardless of in dynamic or static way).

l   The broadcast mode is not enabled.

The commands mentioned above are valid only for Ethernet-type (such as Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet and Virtual Ethernet) interfaces that connect the PE and the CE. The IP-interworking-encapsulated L2VPN connections are forwarded through these interfaces.

The following describes the above commands:

l   On the PE, the MAC address of the CE can be configured manually through the local-ce mac command. Once the MAC address is configured, all IP packets sent from the PE to the CE use this MAC address.

l   On the PE, the IP address of the CE can be configured manually through the local-ce ip command. Suppose that the IP address of the CE is configured on the PE. Before sending an IP packet to the CE, the PE searches for the MAC address of the CE, a static or dynamic one. If no MAC address is found, the PE sends the ARP request within which the source and destination IP addresses are both set to the IP address of the CE. After receiving the ARP request, CE regards that there is another device with the same IP address as itself on the network. If the CE supports gratuitous ARP response packet, the PE can learn the MAC address of the local CE. If not, the PE cannot learn the MAC address of the local CE and fails to forward the packet.

l   The local-ce mac broadcast command enables the broadcast on the PE. Once the broadcast is enabled, when PE sends IP packets to the CE, the broadcast address is taken as the destination MAC address if no static or dynamic MAC address is found and the IP address of the CE is not statically configured.

Run the reset local-ce command in user view to clear the MAC address and VLAN ID information that the Ethernet interface dynamically learns from the local CE.

6.6.7 Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

Action

Command

For CCC local connection and Martini mode, check the VC state information.

display mpls l2vc [ vc-id | interface interface-type interface-number ]

For SVC mode and Martini mode, check the VC information of peer PE on local PE.

display mpls l2vc remote-info [ vc-id ]

For Kompella mode, check the L2VPN connection information.

display mpls l2vpn connection [ [ l2vpn-name [ remote-ce ce-offset | down | up | verbose ] ] | summary | [ interface interface-type interface-number ] ]

 

If the configurations succeed, you can find the VC state is "up" or the connection state of the L2VPN is "up" by running the above commands.

6.7 Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN

6.7.1 Establishing the Configuration Task

Applicable Environment

If the number of VPNs that access the PE is small, the inter-AS VPN-VRF-to-VRF can be adopted. In inter-AS VPN-VRF-to-VRF, the ASBRs must support the VPN instance and can manage the Layer 2 information about the VPN. In addition, the ASBRs must reserve special interfaces, including sub-interfaces, physical interfaces, and the bound logical interfaces, for each inter-AS VPN. Therefore, the inter-AS VPN-VRF-to-VRF requires the ASBRs with high performance. On the ASBRs, no configuration for the inter-AS is needed.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring the inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN, complete the following tasks:

l   Configuring the static route or IGP for the MPLS backbone networks (PE or P) of each AS to implement IP connectivity of the backbone networks in the same AS

l   Enabling MPLS for PEs and ASBR PEs

l   Setting up the tunnel (LSP or MPLS TE) between the PEs and ASBR PEs in the same AS

l   Configuring the IP addresses for the CE interfaces that access the PEs

Data Preparation

To configure the inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN, you need the following data.

No.

Data

1

To configure the L2VPN instance on the PE and the ASBR PE, you need the following data:

l L2VPN instance name and RD

l VPN target

l Tunnel policy (optional)

2

To configure the CE to access the PE and the ASBR PE, you need the following data:

l Name of the CE

l CE ID

l CE range

l CE offset

3

AS number of the PE and the ASBR PE

 

Configuration Procedures

No.

Procedure

1

Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN

2

Checking the Configuration

 

6.7.2 Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN

The realization of the inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN is simple. If the number of the VPNs and the VPN routes on the PEs is small, this scheme can be adopted.

The configuration procedure is as follows:

l   Configuring Kompella MPLS L2VPN for each AS

l   Configuring ASBR PE by considering the peer ASBR-PE as its CE

l   Configuring L2VPN instances for the PE and the ASBR-PE separately

The VPN instance for PE is used to access CE; that for ASBR-PE is used to access its peer ASBR-PE.

In inter-AS VPN-VRF-to-VRF mode, for the same AS, the CE ID of ASBR-PE and the CE offset of the PE must be matched. In addition, the CE ID of PE and the CE offset of the ASBR PE must be matched. In different ASs, there is no such requirement.

In an AS, CE ID must be unique, while in different ASs, CE ID can be repeated.

6.7.3 Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

Action

Command

Check information about the BGP peers.

display bgp l2vpn { all | group [ group-name ] | peer [ [ ip-address ] verbose ] | route-distinguisher rd [ ce-id ce-id [ label-offset label-offset ] ] }

Check information about the Kompella MPLS L2VPN connection.

display mpls l2vpn connection [ [ vpn-name [ remote-ce ce-offset | down | up | verbose ] ] | summary | [ interface interface-type interface-number ] ]

Check L2VPN information on the PE.

display mpls l2vpn [ vpn-name [ local-ce | remote-ce ] ]

Check the route target list of the L2VPN.

display mpls l2vpn { export-route-target-list | import-route-target-list }

 

Run the display bgp l2vc command. You can view the "Destination" is the peer address of the specified VC, and the "route-distinguisher" is correctly configured. It means the label allocation is complete. For example:

<Quidway> display bgp l2vpn all

BGP Local router ID : 2.2.2.9, local AS number : 100

Origin codes:i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

bgp.l2vpn: 1 destination

Route Distinguisher: 100:1

CE ID   Label Offset   Label Base    nexthop         pref      as-path

4       0                132096         3.3.3.9         100   

Run the display mpls l2vpn connection command. You can view the "VPN name" is correctly configured, the "Status" is Up, and the "route-distinguisher" is correctly configured. For example:

[Quidway] display mpls l2vpn connection

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

VPN name: vpn1,

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

  CE name: ce1, id: 1,

  Rid type status peer-id         route-distinguisher   intf

  2   rmt  up     3.3.3.9         100:1                 Pos1/0/0

Run the display mpls l2vpn [ vpn-name [ local-ce | remote-ce ] ] command. You can view the "route-distinguisher" and the route target of the L2VPN are correctly configured. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls l2vpn vpn1

VPN name: vpn1, encap type: interworking, local ce number(s): 1, remote ce number(s): 1

route distinguisher: 100:1, MTU: 128

import vpn target: 1:1,

export vpn target: 1:1,

 

remote vpn site(s) :

no.  remote-pe-id    route-distinguisher

1    3.3.3.9           100:1

Run the display mpls l2vpn { export-route-target-list | import-route-target-list } command. You can view the route target of the L2VPN are correctly configured. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls l2vpn import-route-target-list

import vpn target list: 744:7  745:7  746:7  888:8

<Quidway> display mpls l2vpn export-route-target-list

export vpn target list: 755:7  888:8

6.8 Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Martini L2VPN

6.8.1 Establishing the Configuration Task

Applicable Environment

If the MPLS backbone network that bears Martini L2VPN crosses multiple ASs, the inter-AS Martini L2VPN is needed.

In Martini L2VPN, the two schemes are as follows:

l   Inter-AS Option A: The realization of Option A is simple. If the number of the inter-AS Martini L2VPNs on the ASBRs is small, this option can be adopted.

l   Inter-AS Option C: In this option, the ASBRs do not need to create and maintain VCs. If the number of the inter-AS Martini L2VPNs on the ASBRs is large, this option can be adopted.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring the inter-AS Martini L2VPN, complete the following tasks:

l   Configuring the static route or IGP for the MPLS backbone networks of each AS to implement IP connectivity of the backbone networks in the same AS

l   Enabling MPLS for the MPLS backbone networks of the ASs

l   Configuring MPLS LDP and setting up the LDP LSP for the MPLS backbone network of the ASs

l   For Option C, Setting up the IBGP peer relation between the PEs and the ASBRs in the same AS and setting up the EBGP peer relation between two ASBRs

Data Preparation

To configure Martini L2VPN, you need the following data.

No.

Data

1

Option of the inter-AS VPN

2

AS number of each AS

3

IP addresses of the interfaces connected ASBRs (for Option C)

4

Routing policy (for Option C)

 

Configuration Procedures

No.

Procedure

1

Configuring Inter-AS Option A

Or Configuring Inter-AS Option

2

Checking the Configuration

 

6.8.2 Configuring Inter-AS Option A

The configuration procedure is as follows:

l   Configuring Martini MPLS L2VPN for each AS

l   Configuring ASBR PE by considering the peer ASBR-PE as its CE

No inter-AS configuration is needed on the ASBRs. You need not configure the IP addresses on the interfaces that directly connected ASBRs.

The detailed configuration is not mentioned here.

6.8.3 Configuring Inter-AS Option C

In inter-AS Option C, do not enable LDP between the ASBRs. If LDP is enabled between the ASBRs, the LDP session is set up between the ASBRs. Then the ASBRs set up the egress LSP and send the Mapping messages to the upstream ASBR. After receiving the Mapping messages, the upstream ASBRs set up the transit LSP. If the number of the BGP routes is large, a great amount of LDP labels are consumed.

Configuring Labeled IPv4 Route Exchange on PE side

Do as follows on the PEs within the AS.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

bgp as-number

The BGP view is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

peer peer-address label-route-capability

The exchange of labeled IPv4 routes between the local AS and the ASBR is enabled.

----End

Configuring Labeled IPv4 Route Exchange on ASBR side

Do as follows on the ASBRs within the AS.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

interface interface-type interface-number

The view of the interface that connects the peer ASBR is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

undo shutdown

The interface is started.

                               Step 4     Run:

ip address ip-address { mask | mask-length }

The IP address of the interface is configured.

                               Step 5     Run:

mpls

MPLS is enabled.

                               Step 6     Run:

quit

Return to the system view.

                               Step 7     Run:

bgp as-number

The BGP view is displayed.

                               Step 8     Run:

peer peer-address label-route-capability

The exchange of labeled IPv4 routes between the PEs of the same AS is enabled.

                               Step 9     Run:

peer peer-address as-number as-number

The peer ASBR is specified as the EBGP peer.

                            Step 10     Run:

peer peer-address label-route-capability

The exchange of labeled IPv4 routes between the PE and the peer ASBR is enabled.

----End

In the Option C, an inter-AS LSP must be set up. The public routes advertised between the related PEs and the ASBRs carry the MPLS label information.

If the ASBR and the peer ASBR set up the common EBGP peer relationship, the labeled IPv4 routes can be exchanged.

The public routes carrying the MPLS label are advertised by MP-BGP. According to RFC 3107 (Carrying Label Information in BGP-4), information about the label mapping of a route can be carried in the BGP route update. The feature is realized through the BGP extended attribute. The BGP peer is required to possess the capability of processing the labeled IPv4 routes.

By default, a BGP peer cannot process the labeled IPv4 route.

Creating a Routing Policy

Do as follows on the ASBRs within the AS.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

route-policy policy-name1 permit node seq-number

The routing policy applied to the local PE is created.

                               Step 3     Run:

if-match mpls-label

The labeled IPv4 routes are matched.

                               Step 4     Run:

apply mpls-label

The label allocation for the IPv4 routes is enabled.

                               Step 5     Run:

quit

Return to the system view.

                               Step 6     Run:

route-policy policy-name2 permit node seq-number

The routing policy applied to the peer ASBR is created.

                               Step 7     Run:

apply mpls-label

The label allocation for the IPv4 routes is enabled.

----End

Applying the Routing Policy

Do as follows on the ASBRs within the AS.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

bgp as-number

The BGP view is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

peer peer-address route-policy policy-name1 export

The routing policy used when the routes are advertised to the local CE is configured.

                               Step 4     Run:

peer peer-address route-policy policy-name2 export

The routing policy used when the routes are advertised to the peer ASBR is configured.

----End

After the routing policy is applied on the ASBR:

l   For the routes received on the PE in the local AS, the MPLS label is allocated to the routes when the routes are advertised to the peer ASBR.

l   For the routes advertised to the PE in the local AS, if the routes are labeled IPv4 routes, the MPLS label is allocated to the routes.

The allocation of labels to the IPv4 routes is controlled by the routing policy. The labels are allocated to the routes that satisfy certain conditions.

By default, the IPv4 routes do not carry the MPLS label.

Establishing the MPLS LDP Remote Sessions Between the PEs

Do as follows on the PEs within the AS.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

mpls ldp remote-peer peer-name

The name of the LDP remote session is specified.

To exchange PW information between the PEs, the MPLS LDP remote session must be set up.

                               Step 3     Run:

remote-ip ip-address

The remote IP address of the LDP remote session is specified.

----End

Configuring MPLS L2VC

Configure VCs on the PEs in Configuring Martini MPLS L2VPN. The detailed configuration is not mentioned here.

6.8.4 Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

Action

Command

Check information about the local PW on the PE.

display mpls l2vc [ vc-id | interface interface-type interface-number ]

Check information about the remote PW on the PE.

display mpls l2vc remote-info [ vc-id ]

 

Run the display mpls l2vc [ vc-id | interface interface-type interface-number ] command. You can view the "VC State" is "up". For example:

[Quidway] display mpls l2vc interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

*Client Interface : GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1 is up

  Session State    :UP

  AC State          : up

  VC State          : up

  VC ID             : 100

  VC Type           : vlan

  Destination      : 192.3.3.3

  Local Group ID  : 0

  Remote Group ID : 0

  Local VC Label  : 1025

  Remote VC Label : 1024

  Local VC MTU     : 1500

  Remote VC MTU    : 1500

  Local VCCV        : Disable

  Remote VCCV       : Disable

  Local Frag        : Disable

  Remote Frag       : Disable

  Local Ctrl Word  : Disable

  Remote Ctrl Word : Disable

  Tunnel Policy     : --

  Traffic Behavior : --

  PW Template Name : --

  VC tunnel/token info : 1 tunnels/tokens

  NO.0  TNL Type    : lsp   , TNL ID : 0x202000

  Create time       : 0 days, 0 hours, 2 minutes, 27 seconds

  UP time            : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 1 seconds

  Last change time : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 1 seconds

Run the display mpls l2vc remote-info command. You can view that the "Destination" is the peer address of the specified VC. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls l2vc remote-info

Total remote ldp vc : 1

Transport  Group  Peer             Remote         Remote      C   MTU/   N    S

VC ID       ID     Addr              Encap          VC Label   Bit CELLS Bit Bit

100          0      3.3.3.9          vlan           17408       0    1500   1   0

6.9 Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Kompella L2VPN

6.9.1 Establishing the Configuration Task

Applicable Environment

If the MPLS backbone network that bears the VPN routes crosses multiple ASs, the inter-AS VPN is configured.

Multi-hop mode is also called the VPN-Option C. In this mode, the PE devices connected with CEs directly exchange VPN information. The ASBRs need not maintain the VPN information. If each AS has a great amount of VPN routes to exchange, this mode can be adopted.

Pre-configuration Tasks

Before configuring the inter-AS multi-hop Kompella L2VPN, complete the following tasks:

l   Configuring the static route or IGP for the MPLS backbone networks of each AS to implement IP connectivity of the backbone networks in the same AS

l   Configuring basic MPLS capability for the MPLS backbone networks

l   Configuring MPLS LDP and setting up the LDP LSP for the MPLS backbone network

Data Preparation

To configure the inter-AS multi-hop Kompella L2VPN, you need the following data.

No.

Data

1

Name of the VPN instance and RD

2

VPN target

3

IP address of the CE interface attached to the PE

4

AS number of the PE

5

IP addresses of the interfaces that connect the ASBRs

6

Routing policy applied on the ASBR PEs

 

Configuration Procedures

No.

Procedure

1

Configuring Labeled IPv4 Route Exchange on PE side

2

Configuring Labeled IPv4 Route Exchange on ASBR side

3

Creating a Routing Policy on the ASBR

4

Applying the Routing Policy on the ASBR

5

Establishing the MP-EBGP

6

Configuring the VPN Instance and Create the CE Connection

7

Checking the Configuration

 

In inter-AS multi-hop, do not enable LDP between the ASBRs. If LDP is enabled between the ASBRs, the LDP session is set up between the ASBRs. Then the ASBRs set up the egress LSP and send the Mapping messages to the upstream ASBR. After receiving the Mapping messages, the upstream ASBRs set up the transit LSP. If the number of the BGP routes is large, a great amount of LDP labels are consumed.

6.9.2 Configuring Labeled IPv4 Route Exchange on PE side

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

bgp as-number

The BGP view is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

peer peer-address as-number as-number

The IBGP peer relationship is set up between the PE and the ASBR-PE in the same AS.

                               Step 4     Run:

peer peer-address connect-interface loopback interface-number

The interface used to set up the TCP connection is specified.

To improve reliability, on the PE, the local loopback interface is generally specified as the interface to set up the TCP connection.

                               Step 5     Run:

peer peer-address label-route-capability

The exchange of labeled IPv4 routes with the IBGP peer is enabled.

----End

6.9.3 Configuring Labeled IPv4 Route Exchange on ASBR side

Do as follows on the ASBRs.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

interface interface-type interface-number

The view of the interface that connects the peer ASBR is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

undo shutdown

The interface is started.

                               Step 4     Run:

ip address ip-address { mask | mask-length }

The IP address of the interface is configured.

                               Step 5     Run:

mpls

MPLS is enabled.

                               Step 6     Run:

quit

Return to the system view.

                               Step 7     Run:

bgp as-number

The BGP view is displayed.

                               Step 8     Run:

peer peer-address as-number as-number

The IBGP peer relationship is set up between the PE and the ASBR-PE in the same AS.

                               Step 9     Run:

peer peer-address label-route-capability

The exchange of labeled IPv4 routes with the peer IBGP is enabled.

                            Step 10     Run:

peer peer-address as-number as-number

The peer ASBR is specified as the EBGP peer.

                            Step 11     Run:

peer peer-address label-route-capability

The exchange of labeled IPv4 routes with the peer ASBR is enabled.

----End

In the Option C, an inter-AS LSP must be set up. The public routes advertised between the related PEs and the ASBRs carry the MPLS label information.

If the ASBR and the peer ASBR set up the common EBGP peer relationship, the labeled IPv4 routes can be exchanged.

The public routes carrying the MPLS label are advertised by MP-BGP. According to RFC 3107 (Carrying Label Information in BGP-4), information about the label mapping of a route can be carried in the BGP route update. The feature is realized through the BGP extended attribute. The BGP peer is required to possess the capability of processing the labeled IPv4 routes.

By default, a BGP peer cannot process the labeled IPv4 route.

6.9.4 Creating a Routing Policy

Do as follows on the ASBRs.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

route-policy policy-name1 permit node seq-number

The routing policy applied to the local PE is created.

                               Step 3     Run:

if-match mpls-label

The labeled IPv4 routes are matched.

                               Step 4     Run:

apply mpls-label

The label allocation for the IPv4 routes is enabled.

                               Step 5     Run:

quit

Return to the system view.

                               Step 6     Run:

route-policy policy-name2 permit node seq-number

The routing policy applied to the peer ASBR is created.

                               Step 7     Run:

apply mpls-label

The label allocation for the IPv4 routes is enabled.

----End

6.9.5 Applying the Routing Policy

Do as follows on the ASBRs.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

bgp as-number

The BGP view is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

peer peer-address route-policy policy-name1 export

The routing policy used when the routes are advertised to the local CE is configured.

                               Step 4     Run:

peer peer-address route-policy policy-name2 export

The routing policy used when the routes are advertised to the peer ASBR is configured.

----End

After the routing policy is applied on the ASBR:

l   For the routes received on the PE in the local AS, the MPLS label is allocated to the routes when the routes are advertised to the peer ASBR.

l   For the routes advertised to the PE in the local AS, if the routes are labeled IPv4 routes, the MPLS label is allocated to the routes.

The allocation of labels to the IPv4 routes is controlled by the routing policy. The labels are allocated to the routes that satisfy certain conditions.

By default, the IPv4 routes do not carry the MPLS label.

6.9.6 Establishing the MP-EBGP Peer Relationship Between PEs

Do as follows on the PEs of the two ends of the VC.

                               Step 1     Run:

system-view

The system view is displayed.

                               Step 2     Run:

bgp as-number

The BGP view is displayed.

                               Step 3     Run:

peer peer-address as-number as-number

The peer PE is specified as the EBGP peer.

                               Step 4     Run:

peer peer-address ebgp-max-hop [ hop-count ]

The permitted maximum hops in setting up the EBGP peer is configured.

                               Step 5     Run:

l2vpn-family

The BGP-L2VPN address family view is displayed.

                               Step 6     Run:

peer peer-address enable

The exchange of labeled IPv4 routes with the peer PE is enabled.

----End

By default, the EBGP peer relationship can be set up only between the directly connected routers.

The PEs of different ASs are generally not directly connected. Therefore, to set up the EBGP peer relationship between the PEs of different ASs, you need to configure the permitted maximum hop between the PEs and ensure that the PEs are reachable.

6.9.7 Configuring the VPN Instance and Create the CE Connection

For detailed configuration, see Configuring a VPN and Creating a CE Connection.

6.9.8 Checking the Configuration

Run the following commands to check the previous configuration.

Action

Command

Check information about the L2VPN on the PE.

display mpls l2vpn [ vpn-name [ local-ce | remote-ce ] ]

Check information about the L2VPN connection.

display mpls l2vpn connection [ [ vpn-name [ remote-ce ce-offset | down | up | verbose ] ] | summary | [ interface interface-type interface-number ] ]

Check information about the L2VPN BGP.

display bgp l2vpn { all | group [ group-name ] | peer [ [ ip-address ] verbose ] | route-distinguisher rd [ ce-id ce-id [ label-offset label-offset ] ] }

Check the route target list of the L2VPN.

display mpls l2vpn { export-route-target-list | import-route-target-list }

 

Run the display bgp l2vc command. You can view the "Destination" is the peer address of the specified VC, and the "route-distinguisher" is correctly configured. It means the label allocation is complete. For example:

<Quidway> display bgp l2vpn all

BGP Local router ID : 2.2.2.9, local AS number : 100

Origin codes:i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

bgp.l2vpn: 1 destination

Route Distinguisher: 100:1

CE ID   Label Offset   Label Base    nexthop         pref      as-path

4       0                132096         3.3.3.9         100   

Run the display mpls l2vpn connection command. You can view the "VPN name" is correctly configured, the "Status" is Up, and the "route-distinguisher" is correctly configured. For example:

[Quidway] display mpls l2vpn connection

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

VPN name: vpn1,

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

  CE name: ce1, id: 1,

  Rid type status peer-id         route-distinguisher   intf

  2   rmt  up     3.3.3.9         100:1                 Pos1/0/0

Run the display mpls l2vpn [ vpn-name [ local-ce | remote-ce ] ] command. You can view the "route-distinguisher" and L2VPN route target are correctly configured. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls l2vpn vpn1

VPN name: vpn1, encap type: interworking, local ce number(s): 1, remote ce number(s): 1

route distinguisher: 100:1, MTU: 128

import vpn target: 1:1,

export vpn target: 1:1,

 

remote vpn site(s) :

no.  remote-pe-id    route-distinguisher

1    3.3.3.9           100:1

Run the display mpls l2vpn { export-route-target-list | import-route-target-list } command. You can view the route target of the L2VPN is correctly configured. For example:

<Quidway> display mpls l2vpn import-route-target-list

import vpn target list: 744:7  745:7  746:7  888:8

<Quidway> display mpls l2vpn export-route-target-list

export vpn target list: 755:7  888:8

6.10 Maintaining MPLS L2VPN

This section describes the following:

l   Resetting BGP L2VPN Connections

l   Debugging L2VPN

6.10.1 Resetting BGP L2VPN Connections

Run the following reset command in the user view to clear the running information.

Action

Command

Reset BGP L2VPN connections.

reset bgp l2vpn { as-number | peer-ip-address | all | internal | external }

 

6.10.2 Debugging L2VPN

 

Enabling the debugging affects system performance. After the debugging, run the undo debugging all command to disable it at once.

Run the following debugging commands in the user view to debug MPLS L2VPN and to locate the fault.

For the procedure of outputting the debugging information, refer to the chapter "Maintenance and Debugging" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - System Management.

Action

Command

Enable the Kompella MPLS L2VPN debugging.

debugging mpls l2vpn { all | advertisement | download | error | event | timer | connections [ interface interface-type interface-number ] }

Enable BGP Update packet debugging of Kompella MPLS L2VPN.

debugging bgp update l2vpn [ peer peer-address ] [ receive | send ] [ verbose ]

 

6.11 Configuration Examples

This section provides the following examples:

l   Example for Configuring a CCC Local Connection

l   Example for Configuring a CCC Remote Connection

l   Example for Configuring SVC L2VPN

l   Example for Configuring Martini L2VPN

l   Example for Configuring a Kompella L2VPN Local Connection

l   Example for Configuring a Kompella L2VPN Remote Connection

l   Example for Establishing the Martini L2VPN by Using the MPLS TE Tunnel

l   Example for Configuring L2VPN Interworking Between Different Media: a CCC Remote Connection Between Ethernet and PPP

l   Example for Interconnecting Ethernet with HDLC in the Martini Mode

l   Example for Interconnecting VLAN with ATM in the Kompella Mode

l   Example for Configuring L2VPN Internetworking (VLAN Interconnecting with PPP by Using the Remote Kompella Connection)

l   Examples for Configuring ACs of L2VPN IP-Interworking

l   Example for Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN

l   Example for Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Martini L2VPN

l   Example for Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Kompella L2VPN

6.11.1 Example for Configuring a CCC Local Connection

Networking Requirements

Figure 6-4 shows the CE is connected with the PE through a POS interface. The packets is encapsulated in PPP over the link layer.

A local connection is created between CE1 and CE2.

Figure 6-4 Networking diagram of the CCC local connection

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure basic MPLS capability on PE and enable the MPLS L2VPN.

2.         Create a local connection from CE1 to CE2 on PE. (Because the CCC local connection is duplex, only one connection is needed.)

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the IP addresses of the interfaces.

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure CE.

# Configure CE1.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE1

[CE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.1 24

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure CE2.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE2

[CE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.2 24

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 2     Configure PE.

# Configure LSR ID and enable MPLS and MPLS L2VPN.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname PE

[PE] interface loopback 1

[PE-LoopBack1] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE-LoopBack1] quit

[PE] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE] mpls

[PE-mpls] quit

[PE] mpls l2vpn

# Create a local connection between CE1 and CE2.

[PE] ccc CE1-CE2 interface pos 1/0/0 out-interface pos 2/0/0

                               Step 3     Verify the configuration.

After the configuration, display the CCC connection information on PE. It shows that a CCC local connection is created and the status is up.

[PE] display ccc

total  ccc vc : 1

local  ccc vc : 1,  1 up

remote ccc vc : 0,  0 up

name: CE1-CE2, type: local, state: up,

intf1: Pos1/0/0 (up),   intf2: Pos2/0/0 (up)

Run the display ip routing-table command on CE to display the interface routes learned by CE1 and CE2 from each other. CE1 and CE2 can ping through each other.

Consider CE1 as an example.

[CE1] display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 5        Routes : 5

 

Destination/Mask    Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface

 

      100.1.1.0/24  Direct 0    0           D  100.1.1.1       Pos1/0/0

      100.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      100.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  100.1.1.2       Pos1/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

[CE1] ping 100.1.1.2

  PING 100.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=180 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=60 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=10 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=70 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=60 ms

  --- 100.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

round-trip min/avg/max = 10/76/180 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration file of CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 100.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE

#

 sysname PE

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

 ccc CE1-CE2 interface Pos1/0/0 out-interface Pos2/0/0

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 100.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.2 Example for Configuring a CCC Remote Connection

Networking Requirements

Figure 6-5 shows the CE is connected with PE through POS. PPP is encapsulated at the link layer.

The CCC remote connection is established between CE1 and CE2.

l   Creating a CCC remote connection on PE

l   Configuring two static LSPs on the P device for bidirectional packet transmission

Figure 6-5 Networking diagram of CCC remote connection

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure two static LSPs with opposite directions which work as the data tunnel used by the local CCC connection exclusively.

2.         Enable the MPLS L2VPN on PE. (It is not needed on P.)

3.         Configure two connections, that is, from CE1 to CE2 and from CE2 to CE1.

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the following data:

l   Outer label of the CCC remote connection

l   Inner label of the CCC remote connection

For the settings of the outer label and the inner label, see Figure 6-5.

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure CE.

# Configure CE1.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE1

[CE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.1 24

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure CE2.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE2

[CE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.2 24

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 2     Configure IP addresses on MPLS backbone network.

# Configure PE1.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname PE1

[PE1] interface loopback 1

[PE1-LoopBack1] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack1] quit

[PE1] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.1 24

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure P.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname P

[P] interface loopback 1

[P-LoopBack1] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[P-LoopBack1] quit

[P] interface pos 1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] ip address 10.2.2.2 24

[P-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos 2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[P-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname PE2

[PE2] interface loopback 1

[PE2-LoopBack1] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[PE2-LoopBack1] quit

[PE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 10.2.2.1 24

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 3     Configure basic MPLS capabilities on MPLS backbone network.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE1] mpls

[PE1-mpls] quit

[PE1] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure P.

[P] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[P] mpls

[P-mpls] quit

[P] interface pos 1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos 2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE2] mpls

[PE2-mpls] quit

[PE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 4     Create the CCC remote connection on PE.

# Configure PE1: Globally enable MPLS L2VPN, and create the CCC remote connection between CE1 and CE2. Connect the incoming interface to CE1 and the outgoing interface to P. Set the in-label to 100 and the out-label to 200.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] ccc CE1-CE2 interface pos 1/0/0 in-label 100 out-label 200 out-interface pos 2/0/0

# Configure PE2: Globally enable MPLS L2VPN, and create the CCC remote connection between CE2 and CE1. Connect the incoming interface to CE2 and the outgoing interface to P. Set the in-label to 201 and out-label to 101.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] ccc CE2-CE1 interface pos 2/0/0 in-label 201 out-label 101 out-interface pos 1/0/0

                               Step 5     Forward static LSP on P.

# Configure P: Configure a static LSP to forward packets from PE1 to PE2, and another static LSP to forward packets from PE2 to PE1.

[P] static-lsp transit PE1-PE2 incoming-interface pos 2/0/0 in-label 200 outgoing-interface pos 1/0/0 out-label 201

[P] static-lsp transit PE2-PE1 incoming-interface pos 1/0/0 in-label 101 outgoing-interface pos 2/0/0 out-label 100

                               Step 6     Verify the configuration.

After the configuration, display the CCC connection information on PE. It shows that one CCC connection is established on PE1 and PE2 respectively.

[PE1] display ccc

total  ccc vc : 1

local  ccc vc : 0,  0 up

remote ccc vc : 1,  1 up

name: CE1-CE2, type: remote, state: up,

intf: Pos1/0/0 (up), in-label: 100 , out-label: 200 , out-interface : Pos2/0/0

 

[PE2] display ccc

total  ccc vc : 1

local  ccc vc : 0,  0 up

remote ccc vc : 1,  1 up

name: CE2-CE1, type: remote, state: up,

intf: Pos2/0/0 (up), in-label: 201 , out-label: 101 , out-interface : Pos1/0/0

Run the display mpls lsp command on P to display the label and interface information of two established static LSPs.

[P] display mpls lsp

----------------------------------------------------------------------

                 LSP Information: STATIC LSP

----------------------------------------------------------------------

FEC                In/Out Label  In/Out IF                    Vrf Name

-/-                200/201       Pos2/0/0/Pos1/0/0

-/-                101/100       Pos1/0/0/Pos2/0/0

Run the display ip routing-table command on CE to display the interface routes learned by CE1 and CE2 from each other. CE1 and CE2 can ping through each other.

Consider CE1 as an example:

[CE1] display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 5        Routes : 5

 

Destination/Mask    Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface

 

      100.1.1.0/24  Direct 0    0           D  100.1.1.1       Pos1/0/0

      100.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      100.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  100.1.1.2       Pos1/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

[CE1] ping 100.1.1.2

  PING 100.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=58 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=67 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=52 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=69 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=92 ms

  --- 100.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 52/67/92 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration file of CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdwon

 ip address 100.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

#

 ccc CE1-CE2 interface Pos1/0/0 in-label 100 out-label 200 out-interface Pos2/0/0

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of P

#

 sysname P

#

 mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

 mpls

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 2.2.2.9 255.255.255.255

#

static-lsp transit PE1-PE2 incoming-interface Pos2/0/0 in-label 200 outgoing-interface Pos1/0/0 out-label 201

static-lsp transit PE2-PE1 incoming-interface Pos1/0/0 in-label 101 outgoing-interface Pos2/0/0 out-label 100

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

#

 ccc CE2-CE1 interface Pos2/0/0 in-label 201 out-label 101 out-interface Pos1/0/0

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 3.3.3.9 255.255.255.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 100.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.3 Example for Configuring SVC L2VPN

Networking Requirements

Figure 6-6 shows the CEs are connected with PEs through POS interfaces. The packets are encapsulated in PPP over the link layer.

SVC L2VPN is established between CE1 and CE2. The SVC connection is created on PE and the VC label is assigned.

Figure 6-6 Networking diagram of SVC MPLS L2VPN

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Enable MPLS and the MPLS L2VPN.

2.         Create the L2VC connection between PEs and configure the VC label information manually.

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the label value of the static L2VC connection.

Note that the outer label configured on PE1 is the same as the inner label on PE2; while the inner label on PE1 is the same as the outer label on PE2.

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure interface addresses for CE, PE and P as shown in Figure 6-6.

The specific configuration procedures are not mentioned here.

                               Step 2     Configure IGP on MPLS backbone network. (OSPF is used in this instance.)

During the OSPF configuration, the 32-bit loopback interface addresses for PE1, P and PE2 should be advertised.

The specific configuration procedures are omitted here.

After the configuration, the OSPF neighbor relationship should be established between PE and P. Run the display ospf peer command, and you can view that the neighbor status is Full. Run the display ip routing-table command, and you can view that PE and P can learn the Loopback route of each other.

                               Step 3     Configure MPLS basic capability and LDP on MPLS backbone network, using the LDP LSP tunnel.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE1] mpls

[PE1-mpls] lsp-trigger all

[PE1-mpls] quit

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-mpls-ldp] quit

[PE1] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] mpls ldp

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure P.

[P] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[P] mpls

[P-mpls] lsp-trigger all

[P-mpls] quit

[P] mpls ldp

[P-mpls-ldp] quit

[P] interface pos 1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls ldp

[P-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos 2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls ldp

[P-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE2] mpls

[PE2-mpls] lsp-trigger all

[PE2-mpls] quit

[PE2] mpls ldp

[PE2-mpls-ldp] quit

[PE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] mpls ldp

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

After the configuration mentioned above, the LDP session should be set up between PE1, P and PE2. After running the display mpls ldp session command, you can find Session State is "Optional". Run the display mpls ldp lsp command to display the establishment information of LDP LSP.

                               Step 4     Enable MPLS L2VPN on PE and creating a static VC connection.

# Configure PE1: Create a static VC on interface POS 1/0/0 that accesses CE1.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] mpls static-l2vc destination 3.3.3.9 transmit-vpn-label 100 receive-vpn-label 200

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2: Create a static VC on interface POS 2/0/0 that accesses CE2.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] mpls static-l2vc destination 1.1.1.9 transmit-vpn-label 200 receive-vpn-label 100

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] quit

                               Step 5     Verify the configuration.

Display the L2VPN connection information of SVC on PE. It shows that a static L2VC connection has been established.

Consider PE1 as an example:

[PE1] display mpls static-l2vc

Total svc connections:  1,  1 up,  0 down

 

 *Client Interface     : Pos1/0/0 is up

  AC Status            : up

  VC State             : up

  VC ID                : 0

  VC Type              : ppp

  Destination          : 3.3.3.9

  Transmit VC Label    : 100

  Receive VC Label     : 200

  Control Word         : Disable

  VCCV Capability      : Disable

  Tunnel Policy Name   : --

  Traffic Behavior     : --

  PW Template Name     : --

  Create time          : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 38 seconds

  UP time              : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 11 seconds

  Last change time     : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 11 seconds

Run the display ip routing-table command on CE to display the interface routes learned by CE1 and CE2 from each other. CE1 and CE2 can ping through each other.

Consider CE1 as an example:

[CE1] display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 5        Routes : 5

 

Destination/Mask    Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface

 

      100.1.1.0/24  Direct 0    0           D  100.1.1.1       Pos1/0/0

      100.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      100.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  100.1.1.2       Pos1/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

[CE1] ping 100.1.1.2

  PING 100.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=46 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=91 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=74 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=88 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=82 ms

  --- 100.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 46/76/91 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration file of CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 100.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 mpls static-l2vc destination 3.3.3.9 transmit-vpn-label 100 receive-vpn-label 200

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

  network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of P

#

 sysname P

#

 mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 2.2.2.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

  network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

  network 10.2.2.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 mpls static-l2vc destination 1.1.1.9 transmit-vpn-label 200 receive-vpn-label 100

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 3.3.3.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

  network 10.2.2.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 100.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.4 Example for Configuring Martini L2VPN

Networking Requirements

Figure 6-7 shows that CE1 and CE2 access PE1 and PE2 through VLAN respectively.

Establish Martini L2VPN between CE1 and CE2.

Figure 6-7 Networking diagram of Martini L2VPN

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure the routing protocol on related devices in the backbone network and enable MPLS.

2.         Adopt the default tunnel policy to set up the LSP as the tunnel used to transmit the user data.

3.         Enable the MPLS L2VPN and create the VC connection on PE.

4.         Configure the VLAN sub-interface on CE.

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the following data:

l   The number of the VLAN sub-interface

l   The name of the PE remote peer

l   VC ID

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure CE.

# Configure CE1.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE1

[CE1] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

[CE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] shutdown

[CE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] vlan-type dot1q vid 10

[CE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] ip address 100.1.1.1 24

[CE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

# Configure CE2.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE2

[CE2] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

 [CE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] vlan-type dot1q vid 20

[CE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] ip address 100.1.1.2 24

[CE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

                               Step 2     Configure IGP on MPLS backbone network. (OSPF is used in this instance.)

# Configure interface addresses for PE and P shown in Figure 6-7. During the OSPF configuration, advertise 32-bit loopback interface addresses of PE1, P and PE2.

The specific configuration procedures are not mentioned here.

After the configuration, the OSPF neighbor relationship should be established between PE and P. Run the display ospf peer command, and you can view that the neighbor status is Full. Run the display ip routing-table command, and you can view that PE and P can learn the Loopback route of each other.

                               Step 3     Configure MPLS basic capability and LDP on MPLS backbone network.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE1] mpls

[PE1-mpls] lsp-trigger all

[PE1-mpls] quit

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-mpls-ldp] quit

[PE1] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] mpls ldp

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure P.

[P] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[P] mpls

[P-mpls] lsp-trigger all

[P-mpls] quit

[P] mpls ldp

[P-mpls-ldp] quit

[P] interface pos 1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls ldp

[P-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos 2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls ldp

[P-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE2] mpls

[PE2-mpls] lsp-trigger all

[PE2-mpls] quit

[PE2] mpls ldp

[PE2-mpls-ldp] quit

[PE2] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] mpls ldp

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] quit

                               Step 4     Establish the remote LDP session on PE.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls ldp remote-peer 1

[PE1-mpls-ldp-remote-1] remote-ip 3.3.3.9

[PE1-mpls-ldp-remote-1] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls ldp remote-peer 1

[PE2-mpls-ldp-remote-1] remote-ip 1.1.1.9

[PE2-mpls-ldp-remote-1] quit

                               Step 5     Enable MPLS L2VPN on PE and create the VC connection.

# Configure PE1: Create VC on the sub-interface GE 1/0/0 that accesses CE1.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] mpls l2vpn default martini

[PE1] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] shutdown

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] vlan-type dot1q vid 10

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] mpls l2vc 3.3.3.9 101

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] quit

# Configure PE2: Create VC on the interface GE 1/0/0 that accesses CE2.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] mpls l2vpn default martini

[PE2] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

[PE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] shutdown

[PE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] vlan-type dot1q vid 20

[PE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] mpls l2vc 1.1.1.9 101

[PE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

[PE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] quit

                               Step 6     Verify the configuration.

# Display the L2VPN connection information on PE. It shows that a VC has been established.

Consider PE1 as an example:

[PE1] display mpls l2vc

Total ldp vc : 1     1 up       0 down

 

 *Client Interface     : GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

  Session State        : up

  AC Status            : up

  VC State             : up

  VC ID                : 101

  VC Type              : vlan

  Destination          : 3.3.3.9

  Local VC Label       : 1025

  Remote VC Label      : 1024

  Control Word         : Disable

  Local VC MTU         : 1500

  Remote VC MTU        : 1500

  Tunnel Policy Name   : --

  Traffic Behavior Name: --

  PW Template Name     : --

  Create time          : 0 days, 0 hours, 3 minutes, 14 seconds

  UP time              : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 48 seconds

  Last change time     : 0 days, 0 hours, 1 minutes, 48 seconds

CE1 and CE2 can ping through each other.

Consider CE1 as an example:

[CE1] ping 100.1.1.2

  PING 100.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=31 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=10 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=5 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=2 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=28 ms

  --- 100.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 2/15/31 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration file of CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

 undo shutdown

 vlan-type dot1q vid 10

 ip address 100.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

 mpls l2vpn default martini

#

mpls ldp

#

 mpls ldp remote-peer 1

 remote-ip 3.3.3.9

#

interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

 undo shutdown

 vlan-type dot1q vid 10

 mpls l2vc 3.3.3.9 101

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

  network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of P

#

 sysname P

#

 mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 2.2.2.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

  network 10.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

  network 10.2.2.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

 mpls l2vpn default martini

#

mpls ldp

#

 mpls ldp remote-peer 1

 remote-ip 1.1.1.9

#

interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

 undo shutdown

 vlan-type dot1q vid 20

 mpls l2vc 1.1.1.9 101

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 3.3.3.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

  network 10.2.2.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

 undo shutdown

 vlan-type dot1q vid 20

 ip address 100.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.5 Example for Configuring a Kompella L2VPN Local Connection

Networking Requirements

Figure 6-8 shows that CE1 and CE2 are connected to the same PE through POS interfaces.

A Kompella L2VPN local connection is established between CE1 and CE2.

Figure 6-8 Networking diagram of Kompella L2VPN local connection

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Enable MPLS on PE.

2.         Enable the L2VPN.

3.         Connect the L2VPN instance with CE.

Data Preparation

To configure the Kompella MPLS L2VPN, you need the following data:

l   The name of the VPN instance and the RD

l   The name and number of CE (The CE number is unique globally.)

l   CE range in the label block as required

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure interface addresses for CE1 and CE2 as shown in Figure 6-8.

The specific configuration procedures are not mentioned here.

                               Step 2     Configure a local connection in Kompella mode.

# Configure basic MPLS capabilities.

[PE] interface loopback 1

[PE-LoopBack1] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE-LoopBack1] quit

[PE] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE] mpls

[PE-mpls] quit

# Configure MPLS L2VPN to connect with CE.

[PE] mpls l2vpn

[PE] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce1 id 1 range 10

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] connection ce-offset 2 interface pos 1/0/0

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] quit

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce2 id 2 range 10

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce2] connection ce-offset 1 interface pos 2/0/0

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce2] quit

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] quit

                               Step 3     Verify the configuration.

After the configuration mentioned above, run the display mpls l2vpn connection command on PE. It shows that two L2VPN local connections have been established in up state:

[PE] display mpls l2vpn connection

2 total connections,

connections: 2 up, 0 down, 2 local, 0 remote, 0 unknown

VPN name: vpn1,

2 total connections,

connections: 2 up, 0 down, 2 local, 0 remote, 0 unknown

  CE name: ce1, id: 1,

  Rid type status peer-id         route-distinguisher   intf

  2   loc  up     ---             ---                   Pos1/0/0

  CE name: ce2, id: 2,

  Rid type status peer-id         route-distinguisher   intf

  1   loc  up     ---             ---                   Pos2/0/0

CE1 and CE2 can ping through each other.

[CE1] ping 30.1.1.2

  PING 30.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=24 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=26 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=24 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=51 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=48 ms

  --- 30.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 24/34/51 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration file of CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE

#

 sysname PE

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

  route-distinguisher 100:1

  ce ce1 id 1 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 2 interface Pos1/0/0

  ce ce2 id 2 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 1 interface Pos2/0/0

 #

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.6 Example for Configuring a Kompella L2VPN Remote Connection

Networking Requirements

Figure 6-9 shows that CE1 and CE2 connect to PE1 and PE2 through POS interfaces respectively. The packets are encapsulated in PPP over the link layer.

A Kompella L2VPN remote connection is established between CE1 and CE2.

Figure 6-9 Networking diagram of Kompella L2VPN remote connection

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure the routing protocol on all PEs and Ps in the backbone network and enable MPLS.

2.         Set up MPLS LSP between PEs and configure BGP on PE.

3.         Enable the L2VPN.

4.         Connect the VPN instance with CE.

Data Preparation

To configure the Kompella L2VPN remote connection, you need the following data:

l   The AS number of BGP

l   The name of the VPN instance, RD and the VPN-Target

l   The name and number of CE (The CE number is unique globally.)

l   CE range in the label block as required

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure IGP on MPLS backbone network.

OSPF is used in this instance. The specific configuration procedures are omitted here.

After the configuration, run the display ip routing-table command on each LSR to display routes of LSR ID learned from each other. Run the display ospf peer command to display the OSPF adjacencies in FULL state.

                               Step 2     Configure MPLS basic capability and LDP and establish LDP LSP.

The specific configuration procedures are omitted here.

After the configuration, run the display mpls ldp session and display mpls ldp peer commands on each LSR to display the establishment information of LDP sessions and peers. Run the display mpls lsp command to display the establishment information of LSP.

                               Step 3     Configure BGP L2VPN.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface loopback 1

[PE1-bgp] l2vpn-family

[PE1-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 3.3.3.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-af-l2vpn] quit

[PE1-bgp] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] bgp 100

[PE2-bgp] peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

[PE2-bgp] peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface loopback 1

[PE2-bgp] l2vpn-family

[PE2-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 1.1.1.9 enable

[PE2-bgp-af-l2vpn] quit

[PE2-bgp] quit

After the configuration, run the display bgp l2vpn peer command on PE1 and PE2 to display the peer relationship between PEs. The peer relationship is expected to be in Established state.

Consider PE1 as an example:

[PE1] display bgp l2vpn peer

 BGP local router ID : 1.1.1.9

 Local AS number : 100

 Total number of peers : 1            Peers in established state : 1

  Peer       V    AS  MsgRcvd  MsgSent  OutQ  Up/Down       State PrefRcv

  3.3.3.9   4   100        2        5     0 00:00:07 Established       0

                               Step 4     Connect L2VPN with CE.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce1 id 1 range 10

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] connection ce-offset 2 interface pos 1/0/0

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] quit

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce2 id 2 range 10

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce2] connection ce-offset 1 interface pos 2/0/0

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce2] quit

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] quit

                               Step 5     Verify the configuration.

After the configuration mentioned above, run the display mpls l2vpn connection command on PE. It shows that an L2VPN connection has been established in up state.

Consider PE1 as an example:

[PE1] display mpls l2vpn connection

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

VPN name: vpn1,

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

  CE name: ce1, id: 1,

  Rid type status peer-id         route-distinguisher   intf

  2   rmt  up     3.3.3.9         100:1                 Pos1/0/0

CE1 and CE2 can ping through each other.

[CE1] ping 30.1.1.2

  PING 30.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=90 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=77 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=34 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=46 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=94 ms

  --- 30.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 34/68/94 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration file of CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 168.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

  route-distinguisher 100:1

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce1 id 1 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 2 interface Pos1/0/0

 #

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 100

 peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

 peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface LoopBack1

 #

 l2vpn-family

 policy vpn-target

  peer 3.3.3.9 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

  network 168.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of P

#

 sysname P

#

 mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 168.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 169.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 2.2.2.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 168.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

  network 169.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

  network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 169.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

  route-distinguisher 100:1

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce2 id 2 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 1 interface Pos2/0/0

 #

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 3.3.3.9 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 100

 peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

 peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface LoopBack1

 #

 l2vpn-family

  policy vpn-target

  peer 1.1.1.9 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

  network 169.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.7 Example for Establishing the Martini L2VPN by Using the MPLS TE Tunnel

Networking Requirements

Figure 6-10 Establishment of Martini L2VPN by using the MPLS TE tunnel

 

In Figure 6-10:

l   CE1 and CE2 belong to the same VPN. They access the MPLS backbone network through PE1 and PE2.

l   The MPLS backbone network adopts OSPF.

l   The configuration requirements are as follows:

l   Set up the Martini L2VPN.

l   Set up a MPLS TE tunnel by using the dynamic signaling RSVP-TE to forward the L2VPN traffic.

l   The tunnel bandwidth is 20 Mbit/s.

l   The maximum link bandwidth is 100 Mbit/s. The maximum reservation bandwidth is 50 Mbit/s.

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure the routing protocol on PEs and Ps in the backbone network and enable MPLS.

2.         Set up the MPLS TE tunnel and configure the tunnel policy. For configuration about the MPLS TE tunnel, refer to the chapter "MPLS TE Configuration" in the Quidway NetEngine40 Series Universal Switching Router Configuration Guide - MPLS.

3.         Enable the MPLS L2VPN on PE and create the VC connection.

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the following data:

l   Data for configuring OSPF

l   The name of the tunnel policy

l   The number of tunnels that take part in load balancing. (The number 1 indicates no load balancing is performed.)

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure the IP address of the interface of the backbone network and configure OSPF.

The detailed procedures are omitted.

                               Step 2     Enable MPLS, MPLS TE, MPLS RSVP-TE and MPLS CSPF.

Enable MPLS, MPLS TE and MPLS RSVP-TE in the system view and interface view and enable MPLS CSPF in the system view on the ingress of the tunnel.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE1] mpls

[PE1-mpls] mpls te

[PE1-mpls] mpls rsvp-te

[PE1-mpls] mpls te cspf

[PE1-mpls] quit

[PE1] interface pos1/0/0

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] mpls te

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] mpls rsvp-te

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure P.

[P] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[P] mpls

[P-mpls] mpls te

[P-mpls] mpls rsvp-te

[P-mpls] quit

[P] interface pos1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls te

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls rsvp-te

[P-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls te

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls rsvp-te

[P-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2.

The configuration on PE2 is similar to that on PE1 and is not mentioned here.

                               Step 3     Configure OSPF TE on the backbone network.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] ospf

[PE1-ospf-1] opaque-capability enable

[PE1-ospf-1] area 0.0.0.0

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 100.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] mpls-te enable

# Configure P.

[P] ospf

[P-ospf-1] opaque-capability enable

[P-ospf-1] area 0.0.0.0

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 100.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 100.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] mpls-te enable

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] ospf

[PE2-ospf-1] opaque-capability enable

[PE2-ospf-1] area 0.0.0.0

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 100.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] mpls-te enable

                               Step 4     Configure the MPLS TE attribute.

Configure the maximum link bandwidth and the maximum reservation bandwidth on each interface that the tunnel passes by.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 100000

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 50000

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure P.

[P] interface pos 1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 100000

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 50000

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos 2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls te max-link-bandwidth 100000

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 50000

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2.

The configuration on PE2 is similar to that on PE1 and is omitted here.

                               Step 5     Configure the tunnel interface.

# Create the tunnel interface on PE. Specify the tunnel protocol as MPLS TE and the signaling protocol as RSVP-TE. Set the bandwidth.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] interface tunnel 1/0/0

[PE1-Tunnel1/0/0] ip address unnumbered interface loopback1

[PE1-Tunnel1/0/0] tunnel-protocol mpls te

[PE1-Tunnel1/0/0] mpls te signal-protocol rsvp-te

[PE1-Tunnel1/0/0] destination 3.3.3.9

[PE1-Tunnel1/0/0] mpls te tunnel-id 100

[PE1-Tunnel1/0/0] mpls te bandwidth 20000

[PE1-Tunnel1/0/0] mpls te commit

[PE1-Tunnel1/0/0] undo shutdown

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] interface tunnel 1/0/0

[PE2-Tunnel1/0/0] ip address unnumbered interface loopback1

[PE2-Tunnel1/0/0] tunnel-protocol mpls te

[PE2-Tunnel1/0/0] mpls te signal-protocol rsvp-te

[PE2-Tunnel1/0/0] destination 1.1.1.9

[PE2-Tunnel1/0/0] mpls te tunnel-id 101

[PE2-Tunnel1/0/0] mpls te bandwidth 20000

[PE2-Tunnel1/0/0] mpls te commit

[PE2-Tunnel1/0/0] undo shutdown

After the configuration mentioned above, run the display this interface command in tunnel interface view. You can see that the MPLS TE tunnel is set up successfully. In the display, "Line protocol current state" is "UP".

[PE1-Tunnel1/0/0] display this interface

Tunnel1/0/0 current state : UP

Line protocol current state : UP

Description : HUAWEI, Quidway Series, Tunnel1/0/0 Interface, Route Port

The Maximum Transmit Unit is 12288 bytes

Internet Address is unnumbered, using address of LoopBack1(1.1.1.9/32)

Encapsulation is TUNNEL, loopback not set

Tunnel destination 3.3.3.9

Tunnel protocol/transport MPLS/MPLS, ILM is available,

primary tunnel id is 0x1002003, secondary tunnel id is 0x0

    5 minutes output rate 0 bytes/sec, 0 packets/sec

    0 packets output,  0 bytes

0 output error

                               Step 6     Set up the LDP session.

Set up the remote peer session between PE1 and PE2.

Consider PE1 as an example. The configuration on PE2 is similar to that on PE1 and is omitted.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls ldp

[PE1-mpls-ldp] quit

[PE1] mpls ldp remote-peer  3.3.3.9

[PE1-mpls-ldp-remote-3.3.3.9] remote-ip 3.3.3.9

[PE1-mpls-ldp-remote-3.3.3.9] quit

After the configuration, the LDP session between PEs is set up.

Consider PE1 as an example.

[PE1] display mpls ldp session

               LDP Session(s) in Public Network

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 Peer-ID            Status      LAM  SsnRole  SsnAge      KA-Sent/Rcv

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 3.3.3.9:0          Operational DU   Passive  000:00:06   26/26

----------------------------------------------------------------------

TOTAL: 1 session(s) Found.

LAM : Label Advertisement Mode      SsnAge Unit : DDD:HH:MM

                               Step 7     Configure the tunnel policy and set up the VC connection.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] tunnel-policy policy1

[PE1-tunnel-policy-policy1] tunnel select-seq cr-lsp load-balance-number 1

[PE1-tunnel-policy-policy1] quit

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] mpls l2vpn default martini

[PE1] interface pos2/0/0

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] mpls l2vc 3.3.3.9 100 tunnel-policy policy1

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] tunnel-policy policy1

[PE2-tunnel-policy-policy1] tunnel select-seq cr-lsp load-balance-number 1

[PE2-tunnel-policy-policy1] quit

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] mpls l2vpn default martini

[PE2] interface pos2/0/0

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] mpls l2vc 1.1.1.9 100 tunnel-policy policy1

# Configure CE1.

[CE1] interface pos1/0/0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.1 24

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

# Configure CE2.

[CE2] interface pos1/0/0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

l  The VC IDs on the two ends of the L2VC must be the same. Otherwise, the state of the VC cannot be Up.

l  The PE interface connected to the CE need not be configured with an IP address.

                               Step 8     Verify the configuration.

Running the display mpls forwarding-table command on PE1, you can see "LSPIndex" to 3.3.3.3/32 in the MPLS forwarding table is 4099.

<PE1> display mpls forwarding-table

Fec                Outlabel   Out-IF                 Nexthop         LspIndex

3.3.3.9/32       13312       Pos1/0/0              100.1.1.2        4099

Running the display mpls lsp verbose command on PE1, you can see a MPLS TE tunnel of RSVP TE type is set up between 1.1.1.9 and 3.3.3.9. The "LSP-Index" of the tunnel is 4099. The value is the same as that in the MPLS forwarding table. It means that the local data to 3.3.3.9 is transmitted through the MPLS TE tunnel.

[PE1] display mpls lsp verbose

----------------------------------------------------------------------

                 LSP Information: RSVP LSP

----------------------------------------------------------------------

  No                  :  1

  SessionID           :  100

  IngressLsrID        :  1.1.1.9

  LocalLspID          :  0

  Tunnel-Interface    :  Tunnel1/0/0

  Fec                 :  3.3.3.9/32

  Nexthop             :  100.1.1.2

  In-Label            :  NULL

  Out-Label           :  13312

  In-Interface        :  ----------

  Out-Interface       :  Pos1/0/0

  LspIndex            :  4099

  Token               :  0x1002003

  LsrType             :  Ingress

  Bypass In Use       :  Not Exists

  Bypass Tunnel Id    :  0x0

  BypassTunnel        :  Tunnel Index[---]

  Mpls-Mtu            :  1500

  TimeStamp           :  2633sec

Running the display mpls te tunnel-interface command on PE, you can see the detailed information about the tunnel.

Consider PE1 as an example.

[PE1] display mpls te tunnel-interface

  Tunnel Name       :  Tunnel1/0/0

  Tunnel Desc       :  HUAWEI, Quidway Series, Tunnel1/0/0 Interface

  Tunnel State Desc : CR-LSP is Up

  Tunnel Attributes  :

    LSP ID              :  1.1.1.9:0

    Session ID          :  100

    Admin State         :  UP                 Oper State   :  UP

    Ingress LSR ID      :  1.1.1.9            Egress LSR ID:  3.3.3.9

    Signaling Prot      :  RSVP               Resv Style   :  SE

    Class Type          :  CLASS 0            Tunnel BW    :  20000 kbps

    Reserved BW         :  20000 kbps

    Setup Priority      :  7                     Hold Priority:  7

    Affinity Prop/Mask  :  0x0/0xffff

    Explicit Path Name  :  -

    Tie-Breaking Policy :  None

    Metric Type         :  None

    Record Route        :  Disabled    Record Label :  Disabled

    FRR Flag            :  Disabled    BackUpBW Flag:  Not Supported

    BackUpBW Type       :  -           BackUpBW     :  -

    Route Pinning       :  Disabled

    Retry Limit         :  5           Retry Interval:  10 sec

    Reopt               :  Disabled    Reopt Freq   :  -

    Back Up Type        :  None

    Back Up LSPID       :  -

    Auto BW             :  Disabled    Auto BW Freq :  -

    Min BW              :  -           Max BW       :  -

    Current Collected BW:  -

    Interfaces Protected:  -

    VPN Bind Type       :  NONE

    VPN Bind Value      :  -

    Car Policy          :  Disabled

CE1 and CE2 can ping each other successfully.

<CE1> ping 10.1.1.2

  PING 10.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=125 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=125 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=94 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=125 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=125 ms

   

  --- 10.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

round-trip min/avg/max = 94/118/125 ms

After the CE1 ping through CE2, run the display this interface on PE to check the information about the tunnel interface. You can see that the number of packets that pass the interface increases.

Consider PE1 as an example.

    5 minutes output rate 0 bytes/sec, 0 packets/sec

    1249 packets output,  21526 bytes

    0 output error

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration file of CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

  mpls te

  mpls rsvp-te

  mpls te cspf

 mpls l2vpn

  mpls l2vpn default martini

#

mpls ldp

#

 mpls ldp remote-peer 3.3.3.9

 remote-ip 3.3.3.9

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls te

 mpls te max-link-bandwidth 100000

 mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 50000

 mpls rsvp-te

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 mpls l2vc 3.3.3.9 100 tunnel-policy policy1

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

interface Tunnel1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address unnumbered interface LoopBack1

 tunnel-protocol mpls te

 destination 3.3.3.9

 mpls te tunnel-id 100

 mpls te bandwidth bc0 20000

 mpls te commit

#

ospf 1

 opaque-capability enable

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

  network 100.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

  mpls-te enable

#

tunnel-policy  policy1

 tunnel select-seq  cr-lsp load-balance-number 1

#

return

l   Configuration file of P

#

 sysname P

#

mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

 mpls

  mpls te

  mpls rsvp-te

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 100.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls te

 mpls te max-link-bandwidth 100000

 mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 50000

 mpls rsvp-te

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 100.2.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls te

 mpls te max-link-bandwidth 100000

 mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 50000

 mpls rsvp-te

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 2.2.2.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 opaque-capability enable

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

  network 100.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

  network 100.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

  mpls-te enable

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

 mpls

  mpls te

  mpls rsvp-te

 mpls l2vpn

  mpls l2vpn default martini

#

mpls ldp

#

 mpls ldp remote-peer 1.1.1.9

 remote-ip 1.1.1.9

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.2.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls te

 mpls te max-link-bandwidth 100000

 mpls te max-reservable-bandwidth 50000

 mpls rsvp-te

  mpls te cspf

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 mpls l2vc 1.1.1.9 100 tunnel-policy policy1

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 3.3.3.9 255.255.255.255

#

interface Tunnel1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address unnumbered interface LoopBack1

 tunnel-protocol mpls te

 destination 1.1.1.9

 mpls te tunnel-id 101

 mpls te bandwidth bc0 20000

 mpls te commit

#

ospf 1

 opaque-capability enable

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

  network 100.2.1.0 0.0.0.255

  mpls-te enable

#

tunnel-policy  policy1

 tunnel select-seq  cr-lsp load-balance-number 1

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.8 Example for Configuring L2VPN Interworking Between Different Media: a CCC Remote Connection Between Ethernet and PPP

Networking Requirements

As shown in Figure 6-11, CE1 and PE1 are connected through POS interfaces. Packets transmitted over the link layer are encapsulated with PPP.CE2 and PE2 are connected through GE interfaces. To ensure that CE1 and CE2 can communicate, the CCC remote connection and internetworking must be configured on the PEs. In addition, two static LSPs are required on the P to transmit packets in a bidirectional way.

Figure 6-11 Networking diagram of L2VPN internetworking (Ethernet interconnecting with PPP by using the CCC remote connection

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure two static bidirectional LSPs to work as the data tunnels exclusively used by the local CCC connection.

2.         Enable MPLS L2VPN on the PEs. (MPLS L2VPN is not required on the P.)

3.         Configure two connections, that is, the connections from CE1 to CE2 and from CE2 to CE1.

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the outer label and the inner label of the CCC remote connection. Note the mapping between the outer label and the inner label on the PE and the P. For the settings of the outer label and the inner label, see Figure 6-11.

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure the CEs.

# Configure CE1.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE1

[CE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.1 24

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] remote address 10.1.1.6

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] mtu 1500

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

You are recommended to set the MTU of CE1 and the MTU of PE1 to be the same to avoid the negotiation during packet forwarding.

# Configure CE2.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE2

[CE2] interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/0

[CE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.2 24

[CE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE2-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] quit

                               Step 2     Configure an IP address for each interface on the routers in the backbone network.

# Configure PE1.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname PE1

[PE1] interface loopback 1

[PE1-LoopBack1] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack1] quit

[PE1] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.1 24

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] quit

[PE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] shutdown

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] ip address ppp-negotiate

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] mtu 1500

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

For PE1, the local AC is a POS link running PPP, with the default MTU as 4470; the remote AC is an Ethernet link, with the default MTU as 1500.If PEs fail to negotiate the MTU because the MTUs of the ACs on the two ends are different, the VC cannot be set up. You need to set the MTUs of the ACs on the two ends to be the same (1500).

# Configure P.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname P

[P] interface loopback 1

[P-LoopBack1] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[P-LoopBack1] quit

[P] interface pos 1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] ip address 100.2.2.2 24

[P-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos 2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.2 24

[P-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname PE2

[PE2] interface loopback 1

[PE2-LoopBack1] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[PE2-LoopBack1] quit

[PE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 100.2.2.1 24

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 3     Configure the basic MPLS functions on the MPLS backbone network

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE1] mpls

[PE1-mpls] quit

[PE1] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure P.

[P] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[P] mpls

[P-mpls] quit

[P] interface pos 1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos 2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE2] mpls

[PE2-mpls] quit

[PE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 4     Enable MPLS L2VPN and create CCC remote connection on the PEs.

# Configure PE1.Enable MPLS L2VPN globally and create the CCC remote connection from CE1 to CE2. Connect the incoming interface to CE1 and the outgoing interface to the P. Set the incoming label to 100 and the outgoing label to 200.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] ccc ip-interworking CE1-CE2 interface pos 1/0/0 in-label 100 out-label 200 out-interface pos 2/0/0

# Configure PE2.Enable MPLS L2VPN globally and create the CCC remote connection from CE2 to CE1. Connect the incoming interface to CE2 and the outgoing interface to the P. Set the incoming label to 201 and the outgoing label to 101.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] ccc ip-interworking CE2-CE1 interface GigabitEthernet 2/0/0 in-label 201 out-label 101 out-interface pos 1/0/0

                               Step 5     Configure static LSPs on the P.

# Configure a static LSP on the P to forward packets from PE1 to PE2, and configure another static LSP to forward packets from PE2 to PE1.

[P] static-lsp transit PE1-PE2 incoming-interface pos 2/0/0 in-label 200 outgoing-interface pos 1/0/0 out-label 201

[P] static-lsp transit PE2-PE1 incoming-interface pos 1/0/0 in-label 101 outgoing-interface pos 2/0/0 out-label 100

                               Step 6     Verify the configuration.

After the configuration, view information about the CCC connection on the PEs. You can view that a CCC remote connection is set up on PE1 and PE2 respectively and the status of the two connections is Up.

[PE1] display ccc

total  ccc vc : 1

local  ccc vc : 0,  0 up

remote ccc vc : 1,  1 up

 

name: CE1-CE2, type: remote, state: up,

intf: Pos1/0/0 (up), in-label: 100 , out-label: 200 , out-interface : Pos2/0/0

[PE2] display ccc

total  ccc vc : 1

local  ccc vc : 0,  0 up

remote ccc vc : 1,  1 up

 

name: CE2-CE1, type: remote, state: up,

intf: GigabitEthernet2/0/0 (up), in-label: 201 , out-label: 101 , out-interface : Pos1/0/0

Run the display mpls lsp command on the P, and you can view information about the labels and interfaces of the two established static LSPs.

[P] display mpls lsp

----------------------------------------------------------------------

                 LSP Information: STATIC LSP

----------------------------------------------------------------------

FEC                In/Out Label  In/Out IF                      Vrf Name

-/-                200/201       Pos2/0/0/Pos1/0/0

-/-                101/100       Pos1/0/0/Pos2/0/0

Run the display ip routing-table command on the CEs, and you can find that CE1 and CE2 can learn the route to the CE2 interface and to the CE1 interface respectively.

Take CE1 as an example.

[CE1] display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 5        Routes : 5

 

Destination/Mask    Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface

 

       10.1.1.0/24  Direct 0    0           D  10.1.1.1        Pos1/0/0

       10.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

       10.1.1.6/32  Direct 0    0           D  10.1.1.6        Pos1/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

CE1 and CE2 can successfully ping each other.

[CE1] ping 10.1.1.2

  PING 10.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=190 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=120 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=160 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=100 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=130 ms

 

  --- 10.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 100/140/190 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration file of CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 remote address 10.1.1.6

 mtu 1500

 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

 interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

  ip address ppp-negotiate

  mtu 1500

#

 interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

  link-protocol ppp

  ip address 100.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

  mpls

#

 ccc ip-interworking CE1-CE2 interface Pos1/0/0 in-label 100 out-label 200 out-interface Pos2/0/0

#

 interface LoopBack1

  ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of P

#

 sysname P

#

 mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

 mpls

#

 interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

  ip address 100.2.2.2 255.255.255.0

  mpls

#

 interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

  ip address 100.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

  mpls

#

 interface LoopBack1

  ip address 2.2.2.9 255.255.255.255

#

 static-lsp transit PE1-PE2 incoming-interface Pos2/0/0 in-label 200 outgoing-interface Pos1/0/0 out-label 201

 static-lsp transit PE2-PE1 incoming-interface Pos1/0/0 in-label 101 outgoing-interface Pos2/0/0 out-label 100

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

 interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

  ip address 100.2.2.1 255.255.255.0

  mpls

#

  interface GigabitEthernet2/0/0

  undo shutdown

#

 ccc ip-interworking CE2-CE1 interface GigabitEthernet2/0/0 in-label 201 out-label 101 out-interface Pos1/0/0

#

 interface LoopBack1

  ip address 3.3.3.9 255.255.255.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE2

#

sysname CE2

#

 interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0

 undo shutdown

  ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

 

6.11.9 Example for Interconnecting Ethernet with HDLC in the Martini Mode

Networking Requirements

Figure 6-12 shows that CE-A is connected to PE-A through GE interfaces, while CE-B is connected to PE-B through HDLC (POS).

Figure 6-12 Networking diagram of IP-Interworking - Ethernet to HDLC

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure the routing protocol on PEs and Ps in the backbone network and enable MPLS.

2.         Set up the remote MPLS LDP session between PEs.

3.         Set up the tunnel according to the tunnel policy and create the L2VC connection.

4.         Configure the HDLC protocol and ensure the same MTU on the interfaces connecting CE and PE.

5.         On PE, statically configure the MAC address and the IP address used when PE sends packets to CE.

l  When PE-A and CE-A are connected by an AC link of VLANIF type, the configuration procedure is the same as that for an AC link of Ethernet type. But be sure that the VLAN should contain only one member interface, that is, the physical interface which serves as the AC interface.

l  When PE-A and CE-A are connected by an AC link of Eth-Trunk type, the configuration procedure is the same as that for an AC link of Ethernet type. But you do not need to configure data with the local-ce mac or local-ce ip command.

Data Preparation

To interconnect Ethernet with HDLC, you need the following data:

l   The name of the PE remote peer

l   The label value of the L2VC

l   The MTU value of the interfaces connected CE and PE

l   The MAC address used when PE sends packets to CE

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure IGP on MPLS backbone network.

OSPF is used in this instance. The specific configuration procedures are omitted here.

After the configuration, run the display ip routing-table command on each LSR to display routes of LSR ID learned from each other. Run the display ospf peer command to view the establishment information of the OSPF adjacency that is expected to be in Full state.

                               Step 2     Configure basic MPLS capability and LDP, and establish LDP LSP and remote LDP session between PE-A and PE-B.

# Configure PE-A.

[PE-A] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE-A] mpls

[PE-A-mpls] lsp-trigger all

[PE-A-mpls] quit

[PE-A] mpls ldp

[PE-A-mpls-ldp] quit

[PE-A] mpls ldp remote-peer pe-b

[PE-A-mpls-ldp-remote-pe-b] remote-ip 3.3.3.9

[PE-A-mpls-ldp-remote-pe-b] quit

[PE-A] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE-A-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[PE-A-Pos2/0/0] mpls ldp

[PE-A-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE-A-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure P.

[P] mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

[P] mpls

[P-mpls] lsp-trigger all

[P-mpls] quit

[P] mpls ldp

[P-mpls-ldp] quit

[P] interface pos 1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos1/0/0] mpls ldp

[P-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos 2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[P-Pos2/0/0] mpls ldp

[P-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure PE-B.

[PE-B] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE-B] mpls

[PE-B-mpls] lsp-trigger all

[PE-B-mpls] quit

[PE-B] mpls ldp

[PE-B-mpls-ldp] quit

[PE-B] mpls ldp remote-peer pe-a

[PE-B-mpls-ldp-remote-pe-b] remote-ip 1.1.1.9

[PE-B-mpls-ldp-remote-pe-b] quit

[PE-B] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE-B-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[PE-B-Pos1/0/0] mpls ldp

[PE-B-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE-B-Pos1/0/0] quit

After the configuration, run the display mpls ldp session and display mpls ldp peer commands on each LSR to display the establishment information of LDP sessions and peers.

Consider PE-A as an example:

[PE-A] display mpls ldp session

               LDP Session(s) in Public Network

 ----------------------------------------------------------------

Peer-ID            Status      LAM  SsnRole  SsnAge      KA-Sent/Rcv

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 2.2.2.9:0          Operational DU   Passive  000:00:15   64/64

 3.3.3.9:0          Operational DU   Passive  000:00:01   5/5

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 TOTAL: 2 session(s) Found.

 LAM : Label Advertisement Mode         SsnAge Unit : DDD:HH:MM

 

[PE-A] display mpls ldp peer

         LDP Peer Information in Public network

 ----------------------------------------------------------------

 Peer-ID                Transport-Address  Discovery-Source

 ----------------------------------------------------------------

 2.2.2.9:0              2.2.2.9            Pos2/0/0

 3.3.3.9:0              3.3.3.9            Remote Peer : pe-b

 ----------------------------------------------------------------

                               Step 3     Configure L2VPN IP-Interworking.

# Configure CE-A.

[CE-A] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] shutdown

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] mtu 1500

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] ip address 30.1.1.1 24

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] quit

# Configure PE-A.

[PE-A] mpls l2vpn

[PE-A] mpls l2vpn default martini

[PE-A] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0

[PE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] shutdown

[PE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] mtu 1500

[PE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] mpls l2vc 3.3.3.9 1 ip-interworking

[PE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] ip address 30.1.1.2 24

[PE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] local-ce ip 30.1.1.1

[PE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0] quit

# Configure CE-B.

[CE-B] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE-B-Pos1/0/0] shutdown

[CE-B-Pos1/0/0] mtu 1500

[CE-B-Pos1/0/0] link-protocol hdlc

[CE-B-Pos1/0/0] ip address 30.1.1.2 24

[CE-B-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE-B-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure PE-B.

[PE-B] mpls l2vpn

[PE-B] mpls l2vpn default martini

[PE-B] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE-B-Pos2/0/0] shutdown

[PE-B-Pos2/0/0] mtu 1500

[PE-B-Pos2/0/0] link-protocol hdlc

[PE-B-Pos2/0/0] mpls l2vc 1.1.1.9 1 ip-interworking

[PE-B-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE-B-Pos2/0/0] quit

                               Step 4     Verify the configuration.

After the configuration mentioned above, run the display mpls l2vc command on PE to display the status of VC that is expected to be "up".

[PE-A] display mpls l2vc

Total ldp vc : 1     1 up       0 down

 

 *Client Interface     : GigabitEthernet1/0/0

  Session State        : up

  AC Status            : up

  VC State             : up

  VC ID                : 1

  VC Type              : ip-interworking

  Destination          : 3.3.3.9

  Local VC Label       : 1024

  Remote VC Label      : 1024

  Control Word         : Disable

  Local VC MTU         : 1500

  Remote VC MTU        : 1500

  Tunnel Policy Name   : --

  Traffic Behavior Name: --

  PW Template Name     : --

  Create time          : 0 days, 1 hours, 10 minutes, 12 seconds

  UP time              : 0 days, 0 hours, 6 minutes, 21 seconds

  Last change time     : 0 days, 1 hours, 6 minutes, 21 seconds

Run the display interface command on the interface that accesses CE to display the state of L2VPN connection that is expected to be "up".

[PE-A] display interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0

GigabitEthernet1/0/0 current state : UP

Line protocol current state : DOWN

Description : HUAWEI, Quidway Series, GigabitEthernet1/0/0 Interface

The Maximum Transmit Unit is 1500 bytes, Hold timer is 10(sec)

Internet protocol processing : disabled

IP Sending Frames' Format is PKTFMT_ETHNT_2, Hardware address is 0000-5e32-be01

L2VPN interworking connection is up

L2VPN input: 8318 packets, 0 discards

      output: 0 packets, 0 discards

Output queue : (Urgent queue : Size/Length/Discards)  0/50/0

Output queue : (Protocol queue : Size/Length/Discards) 0/1000/0

Output queue : (FIFO queuing : Size/Length/Discards)  0/75/0

CE-A and CE-B can ping through each other.

[CE-A] ping 30.1.1.2

  PING 30.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=76 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=93 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=71 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=81 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=98 ms

  --- 30.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 71/83/98 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration file of PE-A

#

 sysname PE-A

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

  mpls l2vpn default martini

#

mpls ldp

#

 mpls ldp remote-peer pe-b

 remote-ip 3.3.3.9

#

interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mtu 1500

 local-ce ip 30.1.1.1

 mpls l2vc 3.3.3.9 1 ip-interworking

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 168.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

  network 168.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of P

#

 sysname P

#

 mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 168.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 169.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 2.2.2.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

  network 168.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

  network 169.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of PE-B

#

 sysname PE-B

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

  mpls l2vpn default martini

#

mpls ldp

#

 mpls ldp remote-peer pe-a

 remote-ip 1.1.1.9

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 169.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 link-protocol hdlc

 mtu 1500

 mpls l2vc 1.1.1.9 1 ip-interworking

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 3.3.3.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

  network 169.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE-A

#

 sysname CE-A

#

interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 mtu 1500

 ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration file of CE-B

#

 sysname CE-B

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 link-protocol hdlc

 mtu 1500

 ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.10 Example for Interconnecting VLAN with ATM in the Kompella Mode

Networking Requirements

Figure 6-13 shows that CE-A is connected to PE through the GE sub-interface, while CE-B is connected to PE through the ATM sub-interface.

A local Kompella connection is expected to be established between CE-A and CE-B for their interworking.

Figure 6-13 Networking diagram of IP-Interworking - VLAN to ATM

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Enable the L2VPN.

2.         Connect the VPN instance with CE and specify the encapsulation mode of the L2VPN IP -interworking.

3.         The local connection does not need to transmit signaling protocol; therefore, BGP and the LSP tunnel are not needed.

4.         Configure the VLAN sub-interface on CE-A because CE-A uses the GE sub-interface to access the PE.

5.         Configure CE-B to access the PE through the ATM sub-interfaces and configure the VCs on CE-B and the PE.

Data Preparation

To interconnect VLAN with ATM in the Kompella mode, you need the following data:

l   The ID of the VLAN to which the GE interface belongs to

l   The ATM VC number

l   The name of the VPN instance, RD and the VPN target

l   The name and the number of CE which is unique globally

l   The CE range in the label block as required

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure CE to access PE.

# Configure CE-A.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE-A

[CE-A] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] shutdown

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] vlan-type dot1q 100

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

[CE-A-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] quit

# Configure CE-B.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname CE-B

[CE-B] interface atm 1/0/0.1

[CE-B-Atm1/0/0.1] pvc 1/100

[CE-B-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/100] map ip 30.1.1.1

[CE-B-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/100] undo shutdown

[CE-B-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/100] quit

[CE-B-Atm1/0/0.1] ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

[CE-B-Atm1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

[CE-B-Atm1/0/0.1] quit

# Configure PE.

<Quidway> system-view

[Quidway] sysname PE

[PE] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

[PE-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] shutdown

[PE-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] vlan-type dot1q 100

[PE-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

[PE-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] quit

[PE] interface atm 2/0/0.1 p2p

[PE-Atm2/0/0.1] pvc 1/100

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm2/0/0.1-1/100] map ip inarp

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm2/0/0.1-1/100] undo shutdown

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm2/0/0.1-1/100] quit

[PE-Atm2/0/0.1] undo shutdown

[PE-Atm2/0/0.1] quit

                               Step 2     Configure L2VPN IP-Interworking.

# Configure MPLS basic capability on PE.

[PE] interface loopback 1

[PE-LoopBack1] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE-LoopBack1] quit

[PE] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE] mpls

[PE-mpls] quit

# Establish a Kompella local connection.

[PE] mpls l2vpn

[PE] mpls l2vpn vlantoatm encapsulation ip-interworking

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-vlantoatm] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-vlantoatm] vpn-target 1:1

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-vlantoatm] ce ce1 id 1 range 10

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vlantoatm-ce1] connection ce-offset 2 interface atm2/0/0.1

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vlantoatm-ce1] quit

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-vlantoatm] ce ce2 id 2 range 10

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vlantoatm-ce2] connection ce-offset 1 interface gigabitethernet1/0/0.1

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vlantoatm-ce2] quit

[PE-mpls-l2vpn-vlantoatm] quit

# Configure the PE to access VLAN.

[PE] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

[PE-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] local-ce ip 30.1.1.1

[PE-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] quit

                               Step 3     Verify the configuration.

After the configuration mentioned above, run the display mpls l2vpn connection command on PE. It shows that two Kompella local connections are established in up state.

[PE] display mpls l2vpn connection

2 total connections,

connections: 2 up, 0 down, 2 local, 0 remote, 0 unknown

VPN name: vlantoatm,

2 total connections,

connections: 2 up, 0 down, 2 local, 0 remote, 0 unknown

  CE name: ce1, id: 1,

  Rid type status peer-id      route-distinguisher   intf

  2   loc  up     ---          ---                   Atm2/0/0.1

  CE name: ce2, id: 2,

  Rid type status peer-id      route-distinguisher   intf

  1   loc  up     ---          ---                   GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

CE-A and CE-B can ping through each other.

[CE-A] ping 30.1.1.2

  PING 30.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=52 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=3 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=27 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=26 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=4 ms

  --- 30.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 3/22/52 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration files of CE-A

#

 sysname CE-A

#

interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/0.1

 undo shutdown

 vlan-type dot1q 100

 ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration files of PE

#

 sysname PE

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/0.1

 undo shutdown

 vlan-type dot1q 100

 ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 local-ce ip 30.1.1.1

#

interface Atm2/0/0.1 p2p

 undo shutdown

 pvc 1/100

  undo shutdown

 map ip inarp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

 mpls l2vpn vlantoatm encapsulation ip-interworking

  route-distinguisher 100:1

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce1 id 1 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 2 interface Atm2/0/0.1

  ce ce2 id 2 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 1 interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

 #

#

return

l   Configuration files of CE-B

#

 sysname CE-B

#

interface Atm1/0/0.1

 undo shutdown

 pvc 1/100

  undo shutdown

 map ip 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.11 Example for Configuring L2VPN Internetworking (VLAN Interconnecting with PPP by Using the Remote Kompella Connection)

Networking Requirements

As shown in Figure 6-14, CE1 and PE1 are connected through VLAN10; CE2 and PE2 are encapsulated with PPP. A Kompella remote L2VPN connection between different media is established between CE1 and CE2. A GRE coonection is established between PEs so that CE1 and CE2 interwork at Layer 2.

Figure 6-14 Networking diagram of L2VPN internetworking - VLAN internetworking with PPP in remote Kompella connection

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure a routing protocol on relevant devices (PE and P) of the backbone network so that the devices interwork with each other and then create a GRE tunnel.

2.         Create a tunnel policy on PEs.

3.         Configure BGP on PEs.

4.         Enable L2VPN.

5.         Configure VPN instances to connect CEs.

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the following data:

l   Tunnel ID

l   Tunnel policy name

l   AS number of BGP

l   VPN instance name, RD, and VPN-Target

l   Names of CEs and their IDs (Note that a CE ID must be unique globally.CE range as required

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure connection of CEs and PEs.

# Configure CE1.

<CE1> system-view

[CE1] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

[CE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] shutdown

[CE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] vlan-type dot1q 10

[CE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] ip address 30.1.1.1 24

[CE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

[CE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] quit

# Configure PE1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] interface gigabitethernet 1/0/0.1

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] shutdown

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] vlan-type dot1q 10

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] local-ce ip 30.1.1.1

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] ip address 30.1.1.2 24

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

[PE1-GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1] quit

# Configure PE2.

<PE2> system-view

[PE2] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] shutdown

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] ip address ppp-negotiate

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] mtu 1500

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure CE2.

<CE2> system-view

[CE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] shutdown

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 30.1.1.2 24

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] remote address 30.1.1.6

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 2     Configure IGP on the MPLS backbone network.

In this example, OSPF is used. When you configure OSPF, you need to distribute the 32-bit addresses of the loopback interfaces of PEs and the P router.

# Configure PE1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] interface loopback 1

[PE1-LoopBack1] ip address 1.1.1.9 32

[PE1-LoopBack1] quit

[PE1] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] ip address 168.1.1.1 24

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos2/0/0] quit

[PE1] ospf

[PE1-ospf-1] area 0

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 168.1.1.1 0.0.0.255

[PE1-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[PE1-ospf-1] quit

# Configure P.

<P> system-view

[P] interface loopback 1

[P-LoopBack1] ip address 2.2.2.9 32

[P-LoopBack1] quit

[P] interface pos 1/0/0

[P-Pos1/0/0] ip address 168.1.1.2 24

[P-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos1/0/0] quit

[P] interface pos 2/0/0

[P-Pos2/0/0] ip address 169.1.1.1 24

[P-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[P-Pos2/0/0] quit

[P] ospf

[P-ospf-1] area 0

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 168.1.1.1 0.0.0.255

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 169.1.1.1 0.0.0.255

[P-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[P-ospf-1] quit

# Configure PE2.

<PE2> system-view

[PE2] interface loopback 1

[PE2-LoopBack1] ip address 3.3.3.9 32

[PE2-LoopBack1] quit

[PE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 169.1.1.2 24

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

[PE2] ospf

[PE2-ospf-1] area 0

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] network 169.1.1.1 0.0.0.255

[PE2-ospf-1-area-0.0.0.0] quit

[PE2-ospf-1] quit

After the preceding configuration, when you run the display ip routing-table command on an LSR you should find that the LSR should have learnt the routes from other LSRs. When you run the display ospf peer command, you should find that the OSPF adjacency should have been established and the state is Full.The following is the display on PE1:

[PE1] display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 9        Routes : 9

 

Destination/Mask    Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface

 

        1.1.1.9/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

        2.2.2.9/32  OSPF   10   2           D  168.1.1.2       Pos2/0/0

        3.3.3.9/32  OSPF   10   3           D  168.1.1.2       Pos2/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      168.1.1.0/24  Direct 0    0           D  168.1.1.1       Pos2/0/0

      168.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      168.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  168.1.1.2       Pos2/0/0

      169.1.1.0/24  OSPF   10   2           D  168.1.1.2       Pos2/0/0 

                               Step 3     Configure basic MPLS functions on PEs.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

[PE1] mpls

[PE1-mpls] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

[PE2] mpls

[PE2-mpls] quit

                               Step 4     View the positions of the LPU that provides the GRE function.

The following is the display on PE1:

[PE1] display device pic-status

LPU 5: Online

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

PIC # Online      Type      Port_count  Init_result   Logic down

0     Present    SPU_GRE_VPN_NS    2       SUCCESS       SUCCESS

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Portnum: 0     1

Status : Ok    Ok 

The display shows that LPU 5 provides the GRE function.

                               Step 5     Establishe a GRE tunnel between PEs.

When an interface of a GRE tunnel is created, the slot number of the tunnel interface must be the same as the slot number of the GRE service board.

# Configure PE1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] interface tunnel5/0/1

[PE1-Tunnel5/0/1] tunnel-protocol gre

[PE1-Tunnel5/0/1] ip address unnumbered interface loopback1

[PE1-Tunnel5/0/1] source loopback 1

[PE1-Tunnel5/0/1] destination 3.3.3.9

[PE1-Tunnel5/0/1] undo shutdown

# Configure PE2.

<PE2> system-view

[PE2] interface tunnel5/0/1

[PE2-Tunnel5/0/1] tunnel-protocol gre

[PE2-Tunnel5/0/1] ip address unnumbered interface loopback1

[PE2-Tunnel5/0/1] source loopback 1

[PE2-Tunnel5/0/1] destination 1.1.1.9

[PE2-Tunnel5/0/1] undo shutdown

After the preceding configuration, the two tunnel interfaces should be Up and they can ping each other.The following is the display on PE1:

<PE1> display interface tunnel5/0/1

Tunnel5/0/1 current state : UP

Line protocol current state : UP

Description : HUAWEI, Quidway Series,  Tunnel5/0/1 Interface, Route Port

The Maximum Transmit Unit is 1500 bytes

Internet Address is unnumbered, using address of LoopBack1(1.1.1.9/32)

Encapsulation is TUNNEL, loopback not set

Tunnel source 1.1.1.9 (LoopBack1), destination 3.3.3.9

Tunnel protocol/transport GRE/IP, key disabled

linkalive disabled

Checksumming of packets disabled

QoS max-bandwidth : 64 Kbps

Output queue : (Urgent queue : Size/Length/Discards)  0/50/0

Output queue : (Protocol queue : Size/Length/Discards) 0/1000/0

Output queue : (FIFO queue : Size/Length/Discards)  0/256/0

    5 minutes input rate 0 bytes/sec, 0 packets/sec

    5 minutes output rate 8 bytes/sec, 0 packets/sec

    8 packets input,  792 bytes

    0 input error

    76 packets output,  6772 bytes

    0 output error                                  

<PE1> ping 3.3.3.9

  PING 3.3.3.9: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 3.3.3.9: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=254 time=120 ms

    Reply from 3.3.3.9: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=254 time=160 ms

    Reply from 3.3.3.9: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=254 time=90 ms

    Reply from 3.3.3.9: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=254 time=160 ms

    Reply from 3.3.3.9: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=254 time=70 ms

 

  --- 3.3.3.9 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 70/120/160 ms  

                               Step 6     Create a tunnel policy on PEs.

# Configure PE1.

<PE1> system-view

[PE1] tunnel-policy policy1

[PE1-tunnel-policy-policy1] tunnel select-seq gre load-balance-number 1

[PE1] quit

# Configure PE2.

<PE2> system-view

[PE2] tunnel-policy policy1

[PE2-tunnel-policy-policy1] tunnel select-seq gre load-balance-number 1

[PE2] quit

                               Step 7     Configure the L2VPN function of BGP.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface loopback 1

[PE1-bgp] l2vpn-family

[PE1-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 3.3.3.9 enable

[PE1-bgp-af-l2vpn] quit

[PE1-bgp] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] bgp 100

[PE2-bgp] peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

[PE2-bgp] peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface loopback 1

[PE2-bgp] l2vpn-family

[PE2-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 1.1.1.9 enable

[PE2-bgp-af-l2vpn] quit

[PE2-bgp] quit

After the preceding configuration, when you run the display bgp l2vpn peer command on PE1 or PE2, you should find that the peer relationship has been established between PEs and the state should be Established.

The following is the display on PE1:

[PE1] display bgp l2vpn peer

 

 BGP local router ID : 1.1.1.9

 Local AS number : 100

 Total number of peers : 1                 Peers in established state : 1

 

  Peer            V    AS  MsgRcvd  MsgSent  OutQ  Up/Down       State PrefRcv

  3.3.3.9         4   100        2        4     0 00:00:17 Established       0

                               Step 8     Configure L2VPN and CE connection.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ip-interworking[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 both

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce1 id 1 range 10

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] connection ce-offset 2 interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/0.1tunnel-policy policy1[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] quit

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ip-interworking[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 both

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce2 id 2 range 10

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce2] connection ce-offset 1 interface pos 2/0/0 tunnel-policy policy1[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce2] quit

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] quit

                               Step 9     Verify the configuration.

After the preceding configuration, when you run the display mpls l2vpn connection command on a PE you should find that an L2VPN connection has been established and the state should be Up.

The following is the display on PE1:

[PE1] display mpls l2vpn connection

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

VPN name: vpn1,

1 total connections,

connections: 1 up, 0 down, 0 local, 1 remote, 0 unknown

CE name: ce1, id: 1,

Rid type status peer-id         route-distinguisher   intf

2   rmt  up     3.3.3.9         100:1                GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

The CE1 and CE2 can ping through each other.

[CE1] ping 30.1.1.2

  PING 30.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=500 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=130 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=160 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=160 ms

    Reply from 30.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=150 ms

 

  --- 30.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 130/220/500 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   The configuration file for CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

 interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

  undo shutdown

  vlan-type dot1q 10

  ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   The configuration file for PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1

 undo shutdown

 vlan-type dot1q 10

 ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 local-ce ip 30.1.1.1

#

interface GigabitEthernet5/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface GigabitEthernet5/0/1

 undo shutdown

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 168.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

interface NULL0

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ip-interworking

  route-distinguisher 100:1

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce1 id 1 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 2 interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1 tunnel-policy policy1

 #

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

#

interface  Tunnel5/0/1

 undo shutdown

 ip address unnumbered interface LoopBack1

 tunnel-protocol gre

 source loopback 1

 destination 3.3.3.9

#

bgp 100

 peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 100

 peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface LoopBack1

 #

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  peer 3.3.3.9 enable

 #

 l2vpn-family

  policy vpn-target

  peer 3.3.3.9 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 1.1.1.9 0.0.0.0

  network 168.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

tunnel-policy  policy1

 tunnel select-seq  gre load-balance-number 1

#

return

l   The configuration file for P

#

 sysname P

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 168.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 169.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

interface NULL0

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 2.2.2.9 255.255.255.255

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 2.2.2.9 0.0.0.0

  network 168.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

  network 169.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

return

l   The configuration file for PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

interface GigabitEthernet5/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface GigabitEthernet5/0/1

 undo shutdown

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 169.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address ppp-negotiate

#

interface NULL0

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ip-interworking

  route-distinguisher 100:1

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce2 id 2 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 1 interface Pos2/0/0 tunnel-policy policy1

 #

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 3.3.3.9 255.255.255.255

#

interface  Tunnel5/0/1

 undo shutdown

 ip address unnumbered interface LoopBack1

 tunnel-protocol gre

 source loopback 1

 destination 1.1.1.9

#

bgp 100

 peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

 peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface LoopBack1

 #

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  peer 1.1.1.9 enable

 #

 l2vpn-family

  policy vpn-target

  peer 1.1.1.9 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 3.3.3.9 0.0.0.0

  network 169.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

#

tunnel-policy  policy1

 tunnel select-seq  gre load-balance-number 1

#

return

l   The configuration file for CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

 interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

  ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

  remote address 30.1.1.6

#

return

6.11.12 Examples for Configuring ACs of L2VPN IP-Interworking

l  The processing for IP-interworking enabled interface is similar on Martini connection and Kompella connection. The following takes the Martini configuration for example.

l  The configuration examples in this section assume that L2VPN is globally enabled on PE and the relevant configurations are omitted here.

PPP Between CE and PE

l   Networking Requirements

The CE accesses PE through PPP and assigns IP addresses to PE.

The LDP session between the local PE and remote PE must be already established.

Figure 6-15 Networking diagram of PPP between CE and PE

 

l   Configuration Procedures

# Configure CE.

[CE] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE-Pos1/0/0] shutdown

[CE-Pos1/0/0] link-protocol ppp

[CE-Pos1/0/0] mtu 1500

[CE-Pos1/0/0] ip address 163.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE-Pos1/0/0] remote address 163.1.1.2

[CE-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

# Configure PE.

[PE] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE-Pos1/0/0] shutdown

[PE-Pos1/0/0] link-protocol ppp

[PE-Pos1/0/0] mtu 1500

[PE-Pos1/0/0] ip address ppp-negotiate

[PE-Pos1/0/0] mpls l2vc 5.5.5.5 1000 ip-interworking

[PE-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

For a PPP link, you need to configure an IP address on the interface that connects a PE and a CE so that an AC link can pass the IPCP negotiation.If the interface that connect the PE and the CE is not configured with an IP address, the negotiation cannot succeed and the link layer is not accessible. To configure an IP address on a PE, you can do it manually; or use the ip address ppp-negotiate command on the PE interface that connects the CE or use the remote-address command on the CE interface that connects the PE.

# Check the result of PPP negotiation.

[PE] display interface pos 1/0/0

Pos1/0/0 current state: up

Line protocol current state: up

  Physical layer is Packet over SDH

  Card info: POS OC-3c/STM-1-MM-SR-MTRJ

    Line Type: MultiMode, WaveLength: 1310nm, Transmission Distance: 2km

    Average Optical Output Power: 62.5/125um -20~-14 (dBm) , 50/125um -23.5~-14

(dBm)

    Receiver Overload: -14 (dBm)

    Optical Center Wavelength: 1270~1380 (nm)

    Receiver Sensitivity: -31 (dBm)

  Description: HUAWEI, Quidway Series, Pos1/0/0 Interface

  Internet address is 163.1.1.2/32 Is-Negotiated

  The configured MTU is 1500 bytes, and the negotiated MTU is 1500 bytes

  The BandWidth is 155000 Kbits

  Loopback not set, Clock source master, Scramble enabled, CRC 32, Urpf disabled

  L2vpn tcc enabled

  Link-protocol is PPP

  MRU: 4470 bytes, Negotiate Timeout set 3 seconds

  Peer MRU: 4470 bytes, Magic number: 50399794

  Peer IP address is 163.1.1.1/32

  LCP: Opened

  NCP: IPCP Opened, MPLSCP Opened

     Input: 50 Lcps, 0 Ipcps, 0 Ip6cps, 0 Mplscps, 0 Osicps, 0 Invalids

     Output:50 Lcps, 0 Ipcps, 0 Ip6cps, 0 Mplscps, 0 Osicps, 0 Invalids

  Hold time is 10 (sec)

    Input: 50 Timerhold Packets

    Output:50 Timerhold Packets

  Statistics last cleared: 2007-05-09 16:18:03

  Traffic statistics:

    Last 5 minutes input rate 4 bytes/sec, 0 packets/sec

    Last 5 minutes output rate 4 bytes/sec, 0 packets/sec

    Input: 55 packets, 1260 bytes

           0 MulticastPkts, 0 MulticastBytes

           0 errors, 0 CRC, 0 giants

    Output:55 packets, 1260 bytes, 0 underruns

           0 MulticastPkts, 0 MulticastBytes

           0 CRC, 0 aborted sequences, 0 giants

......

If the IP interworking-enabled L2VPN interface works normally, the following information can be found:

L2vpn tcc enabled

Furthermore, the IPCP status of the interface must be "opened".

If the POS link is adopted, an MTU of 1500 bytes is recommended. The default value of MTU on a POS link is 4470 bytes that may be too big for some links of the MPLS network.

ATM Primary Interface between CE and PE

l   Networking Requirements

CE accesses PE through ATM.

Figure 6-16 Networking diagram of ATM primary interface between CE and PE

 

l   Configuration Procedures

# Configure CE.

[CE] interface atm 1/0/0

[CE-Atm1/0/0] pvc 1/500

[CE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0-1/500] map ip inarp

[CE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0-1/500] undo shutdown

[CE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0-1/500] quit

[CE-Atm1/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE-Atm1/0/0] undo shutdown

# Configure PE.

[PE] interface atm 1/0/0

[PE-Atm1/0/0] pvc 1/500

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0-1/500] map ip inarp

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0-1/500] undo shutdown

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0-1/500] quit

[PE-Atm1/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

[PE-Atm1/0/0] mpls l2vc 5.5.5.5 333 ip-interworking

[PE-Atm1/0/0] undo shutdown

l  When using L2VPN IP interworking, you need to configure the IPoA mapping on the PVC.

l  The AAL5 encapsulation type of PVC can be aal5snap, InARP supported.

ATM Sub-Interface between CE and PE

l   Networking requirements

CE accesses PE through ATM. The sub-interface is used for the interworking access with the precondition that the primary interface works normally.

L2VPN does not support P2MP.Therefore, if you want to create an MPLS L2VC on an ATM sub-interface, the ATM sub-interface must be of Point to Point (P2P) type.

Figure 6-17 Networking diagram of ATM sub interface between CE and PE

 

l   Configuration procedures

This section describes two ways of configuration.

       Configuration with static map on CE

# Configure ATM 1/0/0.1 on CE.

[CE] interface atm 1/0/0.1 p2p

[CE-Atm1/0/0.1] pvc 1/105

[CE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/105] map ip 105.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

[CE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/105] undo shutdown

[CE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/105] quit

[CE-Atm1/0/0.1] ip address 105.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE-Atm1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

# Configure ATM 1/0/0.1 on PE.

[PE] interface atm 1/0/0.1 p2p

[PE-Atm1/0/0.1] pvc 1/105

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/105] map ip default

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/105] undo shutdown

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/105] quit

[PE-Atm1/0/0.1] mpls l2vc 5.5.5.5 333 ip-interworking

[PE-Atm1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

       Create map dynamically with INARP

# Configure the interface on CE.

[CE] interface atm 1/0/0.1 p2p

[CE-Atm1/0/0.1] pvc 1/103

[CE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/103] map ip inarp

[CE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/103] undo shutdown

[CE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/103] quit

[CE-Atm1/0/0.1] ip address 105.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE-Atm1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

# Configure the interface on PE.

[PE] interface atm 1/0/0.1 p2p

[PE-Atm1/0/0.1] pvc 1/103

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/103] map ip inarp

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/103] undo shutdown

[PE-atm-pvc-Atm1/0/0.1-1/103] quit

[PE-Atm1/0/0.1] ip address 105.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

[PE-Atm1/0/0.1] mpls l2vc 5.5.5.5 333 ip-interworking

[PE-Atm1/0/0.1] undo shutdown

If the mapping is created dynamically through INARP, an IP address should be configured on PE. The IP address is that of the CE interface connected to the remote PE.

6.11.13 Example for Configuring Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN

Networking Requirements

As shown in Figure 6-18, the MPLS backbone network adopts OSPF as the IGP protocol.

It is required to configure VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN and consider the peer AS as the CE.

Figure 6-18 Networking diagram for Inter-AS VRF-to-VRF Kompella L2VPN

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure IGP for the backbone network.

2.         Enable MPLS on the backbone network and set up dynamic LSP tunnel between the PE and the ASBR-PE.

3.         Set up IBGP between the PE and the ASBR-PE of the same AS.

4.         Set up the Kompella L2VPN connection between the PE and the ASBR-PE of the same AS.

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the following data:

l   Data for configuring OSPF

l   MPLS LSR-ID of the PE and the ASBR-PE

l   L2VPN instance name of PE and the ASBR-PE, RD and VPN-Target

l   CE connection name on the PE and the ASBR-PE, CE ID, CE-Range (The default is 10), Default-Offset (1 or 0, the default is 0)

The interfaces connected the PE and the CE need not be configured with IP addresses because the L2VPN is emulated Layer 2 service.

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure IGP on the MPLS backbone.

OSPF is used as the IGP protocol in this example. The configuration procedure is not mentioned here.

Note that the address of Loopback1 must be advertised to the IBGP peer.

After the configuration, run the display ip routing-table command. You can find the ASBR-PE and the PE of the same AS can learn the Loopback1 address from each other.

Take PE1 as an example:

<PE1> display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 7        Routes : 7

 

Destination/Mask  Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface     

       1.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

       2.2.2.2/32  OSPF   10   2           D  20.1.1.2        Pos2/0/0

      20.1.1.0/30  Direct 0    0           D  20.1.1.1        Pos2/0/0

      20.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      20.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  20.1.1.2        Pos2/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0          D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0          D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

The ASBR-PE and the PE in the same AS can ping through each other's Loopback1 interface.

                               Step 2     Enable MPLS and set up LDP LSP.

Enable MPLS and set up LDP LSP on the ASBR-PE and the PE in the same AS.

The configuration procedure is not mentioned here.

After the configuration, the LDP neighbor relationship should be established between the PE and the ASBR-PE in the same AS. Running the display mpls ldp session command on the routers, you can find the session state is "Operational" in the command output.

Take PE1 as an example.

 [PE1] display mpls ldp session

 

               LDP Session(s) in Public Network

 ---------------------------------------------------------------------

 Peer-ID            Status       LAM  SsnRole  SsnAge      KA-Sent/Rcv

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 2.2.2.2:0          Operational DU   Passive  000:01:03  2/2

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 TOTAL: 1 session(s) Found.

 LAM : Label Advertisement Mode      SsnAge Unit : DDD:HH:MM

                               Step 3     Configure IBGP.

Configure MP-IBGP between the PE1 and the ASBR-PE1, between the PE2 and the ASBR-PE2.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 2.2.2.2 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 2.2.2.2 connect-interface LoopBack 1

[PE1-bgp] quit

# Configure ASBR-PE1.

[ASBR-PE1] bgp 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.1 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.1 connect-interface loopback 1

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] quit

# Configure ASBR-PE2.

[ASBR-PE2] bgp 200

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.4 as-number 200

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.4 connect-interface loopback 1

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] bgp 200

[PE2-bgp] peer 3.3.3.3 as-number 200

[PE2-bgp] peer 3.3.3.3 connect-interface loopback 1

[PE2-bgp] quit

After the above configurations, run the display bgp peer command on the ASBR-PE. You can find the status of the IBGP peer between the PE1 and the ASBR-PE in the same AS is "Established", and the status of the EBGP peer between ASBR-PEs is "Established".

Take PE1 as an example.

[PE1] display bgp peer

 

 BGP local router ID : 2.2.2.2

 Local AS number : 100

 Total number of peers : 2                 Peers in established state : 2

 

  Peer           V   AS  MsgRcvd  MsgSent  OutQ  Up/Down     State  PrefRcv

 

  2.2.2.2        4   100       85       92     0 00:32:05 Established       0

                               Step 4     Configure the BGP peer in the BGP L2VPN address family view.

Enable the BGP peer in the BGP L2VPN address family view on the PE and the ASBR-PE to ensure the information about the L2VPN instance can be exchanged between the PE and the ASBR-PE .

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp] l2vpn-family

[PE1-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 2.2.2.2 enable

# Configure ASBR-PE1.

[ASBR-PE1] bgp 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] l2vpn-family

[ASBR-PE1-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 1.1.1.1 enable

# Configure ASBR-PE2.

[ASBR-PE2] bgp 200

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] l2vpn-family

[ASBR-PE2-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 4.4.4.4 enable

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] bgp 200

[PE2-bgp] l2vpn-family

[PE2-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 3.3.3.3 enable

                               Step 5     Establish the Kompella L2VPN connection between PEs.

The major procedure is as follows:

l   Enabling MPLS L2VPN on the PE and the ASBR-PE

l   Creating a VPN instance and CE connection on the PE1 and the PE2

l   Configuring the IP addresses for the interfaces connected the CE1 and the CE2

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] mtu 1500

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 both

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce1 id 1 range 10 default-offset 0

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] connection ce-offset 2 interface pos1/0/0

# Configure ASBR-PE1.

[ASBR-PE1] mpls l2vpn

[ASBR-PE1] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

[ASBR-PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:2

[ASBR-PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] mtu 1500

[ASBR-PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 both

[ASBR-PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce2 id 2 range 10 default-offset 0

[ASBR-PE1-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] connection ce-offset 1 interface pos2/0/0

# Configure ASBR-PE2.

[ASBR-PE2] mpls l2vpn

[ASBR-PE2] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

[ASBR-PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 200:1

[ASBR-PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] mtu 1500

[ASBR-PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 both

[ASBR-PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce3 id 3 range 10 default-offset 0

[ASBR-PE2-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] connection ce-offset 4 interface pos1/0/0

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 200:2

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] mtu 1500

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1 both

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce4 id 4 range 10 default-offset 0

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] connection ce-offset 3 interface pos2/0/0

# Configure CE1.

[CE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure CE2.

[CE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 6     Verify the configuration.

Check information about the L2VPN connection on the PE1. You can view that an L2VC is set up and the VC status is Up.

Take the PE1 and the ASBR-PE2 as examples:

# The display on the PE1 is as follows:

[PE1] display mpls l2vpn connection interface pos 1/0/0

conn-type: remote, local vc state: up, remote vc state: up,

     local ce-id: 1, local ce name: ce1, remote ce-id: 2,

     intf(state,encap): Pos1/0/0(up,ppp),

     peer id: 2.2.2.2, route-distinguisher: 100:2,

     local vc label: 21506, remote vc label: 21505,

     tunnel policy: default

     Local C bit is not set, Remote C bit is not set

tunnel type: lsp   , id: 0x1002002

# The display on the ASBR-PE2 is as follows:

[ASBR-PE2] display mpls l2vpn connection interface pos1/0/0

conn-type: remote, local vc state: up, remote vc state: up,

     local ce-id: 3, local ce name: ce3, remote ce-id: 4,

     intf(state,encap): Pos1/0/0(up,ppp),

     peer id: 4.4.4.4, route-distinguisher: 200:2,

     local vc label: 21518, remote vc label: 21507,

     tunnel policy: default

     Local C bit is not set, Remote C bit is not set

tunnel type: lsp   , id: 0x6002000

You can view that there are routes between the CE1 and the.

The display on the PE1 is as follows:

Take the CE1 as an example:

 [CE1] display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 5        Routes : 5

 

Destination/Mask   Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface     

 

       10.1.1.0/24  Direct 0    0           D  10.1.1.1        Pos1/0/0

       10.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

       10.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  10.1.1.2        Pos1/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

The CE1 and the CE2 can successfully ping each other.

<CE1> ping 10.1.1.2

  PING 10.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=125 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=125 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=94 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=125 ms

    Reply from 10.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=125 ms

   

  --- 10.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 94/118/125 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration files of the CE1

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration files of the PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.1

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 20.1.1.1 255.255.255.252

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 100

 peer 2.2.2.2 as-number 100

 peer 2.2.2.2 connect-interface LoopBack1

 #

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  peer 2.2.2.2 enable 

#

 l2vpn-family

  policy vpn-target

  peer 2.2.2.2 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 1.1.1.1 0.0.0.0

  network 20.1.1.0 0.0.0.3

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

  route-distinguisher 100:1

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce1 id 1 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 2 interface Pos1/0/0

 #

#

return

l   Configuration files of the ASBR-PE1

#

 sysname ASBR-PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.2

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 20.1.1.2 255.255.255.252

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.252

 mpls

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 100

 peer 1.1.1.1 as-number 100

 peer 1.1.1.1 connect-interface LoopBack1

#

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  peer 1.1.1.1 enable

#

 l2vpn-family

  undo policy vpn-target

  peer 1.1.1.1 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 2.2.2.2 0.0.0.0

  network 20.1.1.0 0.0.0.3

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

  route-distinguisher 100:2

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce2 id 2 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 1 interface Pos2/0/0

#

return

l   Configuration files of the ASBR-PE2

#

 sysname ASBR-PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.3

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 40.1.1.1 255.255.255.252

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 3.3.3.3 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 200

 peer 4.4.4.4 as-number 200

 peer 4.4.4.4 connect-interface LoopBack1

#

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  peer 4.4.4.4 enable

#

 l2vpn-family

  undo policy vpn-target

  peer 4.4.4.4 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 3.3.3.3 0.0.0.0

  network 40.1.1.0 0.0.0.3

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

  route-distinguisher 200:1

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce3 id 3 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 4 interface Pos1/0/0

#

return

l   Configuration files of the PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.4

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 40.1.1.2 255.255.255.252

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 4.4.4.4 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 200

 peer 3.3.3.3 as-number 200

 peer 3.3.3.3 connect-interface LoopBack1

 #

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization 

  peer 3.3.3.3 enable 

 #

 l2vpn-family

  policy vpn-target

  peer 3.3.3.3 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 40.1.1.0 0.0.0.3

  network 4.4.4.4 0.0.0.0

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

  route-distinguisher 200:2

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce4 id 4 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 3 interface Pos2/0/0

 #

#

return

l   Configuration files of the CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.14 Example for Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Martini L2VPN

Networking Requirements

As shown in Figure 6-19, the CE1 and the CE2 belong to the same VPN. The CE1 and the CE2 access the backbone network through the PE1 in the AS100 and the PE2 in the AS200 respectively.

It is required to use Multi-Hop mode to realize the inter-AS Martini L2VPN.

Figure 6-19 Networking diagram for inter-AS L2VPN

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure IGP for the backbone network.

2.         Enable MPLS on the backbone network and set up dynamic LSP tunnel between the PE and the ASBR-PE.

3.         Set up IBGP between the PE and the ASBR-PE of the same AS and set up the EBGP between the ASBR-PEs.

4.         Configure the routing policy on the ASBR-SE and enable the labeled route function.

5.         Set up the MPLS LDP remote peer relationship between the PE1 and PE2.

6.         Create the MPLS L2VC connection between the PE1 and PE2.

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the following data:

l   Data for configuring IS-IS

l   IP address of the (remote) peer (The address is a loopback interface address on the peer or the remote peer.)

l   MPLS LSR-ID of the PE and the ASBR-PE (The address is a loopback interface address on the local end.)

l   L2VC-ID

l   Routing policy used by the ASBR-PE

l   IP addresses of the CE interfaces that access the PE

The PE interfaces that access the CE need not be configured with the IP addresses.

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure IGP on the MPLS backbone.

IS-IS is used as the IGP protocol in this example. The configuration procedure is not mentioned here.

Note that Loopback0 must be enabled with IS-IS.

After the configuration, the IS-IS neighbor is set up between the ASBR-PE and the PE of the same AS. Running the display isis peer command, you can find the IS-IS neighbor status is Up, and the ASBR-PE and the PE of the same AS can learn the Loopback address of each other.

Take PE1 as an example:

<PE1> display isis peer

 

                          Peer information for ISIS(1)

                          ----------------------------

  System Id    Interface         Circuit Id     State HoldTime Type      PRI

0000.0000.0002 P2/0/0           001               Up   23s       L1L2      --

 

<PE1> display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 7        Routes : 7

 

Destination/Mask   Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface      

 

        1.1.1.9/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

        2.2.2.9/32  ISIS   15   10          D  10.1.1.2        Pos2/0/0

       10.1.1.0/24  Direct 0    0           D  10.1.1.1        Pos2/0/0

       10.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

       10.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  10.1.1.2        Pos2/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

The ASBR-PE and the PE of the same AS can successfully ping each other's Loopback0 address.

Take ASBR-PE1 as an example:

<ASBR-PE1> ping 1.1.1.9

  PING 1.1.1.9: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 1.1.1.9: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=47 ms

    Reply from 1.1.1.9: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=31 ms

    Reply from 1.1.1.9: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=31 ms

    Reply from 1.1.1.9: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=31 ms

    Reply from 1.1.1.9: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=31 ms

 

  --- 1.1.1.9 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 31/34/47 ms

                               Step 2     Enable MPLS and set up the LSP.

Enable MPLS and set up LDP LSP on the ASBR-PE and the PE in the same AS.

The configuration procedure is not mentioned here.

After the configuration, the LDP neighbor relationship should be established between the PE and the ASBR-PE in the same AS. Running the display mpls ldp session command on the routers, you can find the session state is "Operational" in the command output.

Take PE1 as an example.

[PE1] display mpls ldp session

 

               LDP Session(s) in Public Network

 ---------------------------------------------------------------------

 Peer-ID            Status       LAM  SsnRole  SsnAge      KA-Sent/Rcv

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 2.2.2.9:0          Operational DU   Passive  000:00:00   2/2

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 TOTAL: 1 session(s) Found.

 LAM : Label Advertisement Mode      SsnAge Unit : DDD:HH:MM

                               Step 3     Configure MP-BGP.

Configure MP-IBGP between the PE1 and the ASBR-PE1, between the PE2 and the ASBR-PE2.

Configure MP-EBGP between the ASBR-PE1 and the ASBR-PE2. Note that the Loopback0 routes of the PE in the local AS must be advertised to the peer ASBR-PE.

If the link between the ASBR-PEs is non-P2P, the ASBR-PE must advertise the network segment address between the ASBR-PEs to the peer ASBR-PE.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 2.2.2.9 label-route-capability

[PE1-bgp] peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface LoopBack0

[PE1-bgp] quit

# Configure ASBR-PE1.

When the routes advertised to the peer ASBR PE are received from a PE of the local AS, MPLS labels are assigned at the time when the routes are advertised. If the routes advertised to a PE of the local AS are IPv4 routes carrying labels, MPLS labels are re-assigned to these routes.

[ASBR-PE1] interface pos 2/0/0

[ASBR-PE1-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[ASBR-PE1-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[ASBR-PE1-Pos2/0/0] quit

[ASBR-PE1] route-policy policy1 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] if-match mpls-label

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] quit

[ASBR-PE1] route-policy policy2 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] quit

[ASBR-PE1] bgp 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] network 1.1.1.9 32

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.9 route-policy policy1 export

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.9 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface LoopBack0

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 20.1.1.2 as-number 200

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 20.1.1.2 route-policy policy2 export

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 20.1.1.2 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] quit

# Configure ASBR-PE2.

When the routes advertised to the peer ASBR PE are received from a PE of the local AS, MPLS labels are assigned at the time when the routes are advertised.If the routes advertised to a PE of the local AS are IPv4 routes carrying labels, MPLS labels are re-assigned to these routes.

[ASBR-PE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[ASBR-PE2-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[ASBR-PE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[ASBR-PE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

[ASBR-PE2] route-policy policy1 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] if-match mpls-label

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] quit

[ASBR-PE2] route-policy policy2 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] quit

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] bgp 200

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] network 4.4.4.9 32

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 20.1.1.1 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 20.1.1.1 route-policy policy2 export

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 20.1.1.1 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.9 as-number 200

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.9 route-policy policy1 export

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.9 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.9 connect-interface LoopBack0

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] bgp 200

[PE2-bgp] peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 200

[PE2-bgp] peer 3.3.3.9 label-route-capability

[PE2-bgp] peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface LoopBack0

[PE2-bgp] quit

After the preceding configuration, when you use the display bgp peer command on an ASBR you should find that an IBGP session should have been established between the PE and the ASBR PE of the same AS and the session state should be Established. The state of the EBGP sesstion between ASBR PEs should also be Established.The following is the display on ASBR-PE1:

[ASBR-PE1] display bgp peer

                        

 BGP local router ID : 2.2.2.9

 Local AS number : 100

 Total number of peers : 2                 Peers in established state : 2

 

 Peer           V    AS  MsgRcvd  MsgSent  OutQ  Up/Down       State PrefRcv

 

 1.1.1.9         4   100      111      128     0 00:34:24 Established       0

 20.1.1.2        4   200       75       89     0 00:38:40 Established       1

                               Step 4     Set up the LDP remote session between the PE1 and the PE2.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls ldp remote-peer 4.4.4.9

[PE1-mpls-ldp-remote-4.4.4.9] remote-ip 4.4.4.9

[PE1-mpls-ldp-remote-4.4.4.9] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls ldp remote-peer 1.1.1.9

[PE2-mpls-ldp-remote-1.1.1.9] remote-ip 1.1.1.9

[PE2-mpls-ldp-remote-1.1.1.9] quit

                               Step 5     Create the L2VPN connection.

Configure the L2VPN connection on the PE routers to ensure the CE can access the PE.

L2VPN does not support P2MP. If the MPLS L2VC is created on an ATM sub-interface, the ATM sub-interface must be a P2P interface.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] mpls l2vpn default martini

[PE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] mpls l2vc 4.4.4.9 100

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] mpls l2vpn default martini

[PE2] interface pos 2/0/0

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] mpls l2vc 1.1.1.9 100

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[PE2-Pos2/0/0] quit

# Configure CE1.

[CE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure CE2.

[CE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 100.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 6     Verify the configuration.

Check information about the L2VPN connection on the PE1. You can view that an L2VC is set up and the VC status is Up.

Take the PE1 as an examples:

<PE1> display mpls l2vc interface pos 1/0/0

 *Client Interface : Pos1/0/0 is up

 AC State          : up

 VC state          : up

 VC ID              : 100

 VC Type            : ppp

 Destination       : 4.4.4.9

 Local Group I    : 0

Remote Group ID : 0

 Local VC Label   : 17409

 Remote VC Label  : 17409

  Local VC MTU      : 4470

  Remote VC MTU     : 4470

  Local VCCV        : Disable

  Remote VCCV       : Disable

  Local Frag        : Disable

  Remote Frag       : Disable

  Local Ctrl Word  : Disable

  Remote Ctrl Word : Disable

  Tunnel Policy     : --

  Traffic Behavior : --

  PW Template Name : --

  VC tunnel/token info : 1 tunnels/tokens

  NO.0  TNL Type    : lsp   , TNL ID : 0x600200d

  Create time       : 0 days, 0 hours, 50 minutes, 40 seconds

  UP time            : 0 days, 0 hours, 0 minutes, 24 seconds

  Last change time : 0 days, 0 hours, 0 minutes, 24 seconds

CE1 and CE2 should have routes to each other.

Take the CE1 as an examples:

<CE1> display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 5        Routes : 5

 

Destination/Mask    Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface      

 

      100.1.1.0/24  Direct 0    0           D  100.1.1.1       Pos1/0/0

      100.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      100.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  100.1.1.2       Pos1/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0s

The CE1 and the CE2 can successfully ping each other.

<CE1> ping 100.1.1.2

  PING 100.1.1.2: 56  data bytes, press CTRL_C to break

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=125 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=2 ttl=255 time=125 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=3 ttl=255 time=94 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=4 ttl=255 time=125 ms

    Reply from 100.1.1.2: bytes=56 Sequence=5 ttl=255 time=125 ms

   

  --- 100.1.1.2 ping statistics ---

    5 packet(s) transmitted

    5 packet(s) received

    0.00% packet loss

    round-trip min/avg/max = 94/118/125 ms

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration files of the CE1

#

 sysname CE1

#

interface Pos1/0/0

undo shutdown

ip address 100.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration files of the PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.9

 mpls

   lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

  mpls l2vpn default martini

#

mpls ldp

#

 mpls ldp remote-peer 4.4.4.9

 remote-ip 4.4.4.9

#

isis 1

 network-entity 10.0000.0000.0001.00

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 mpls l2vc 4.4.4.9 100

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 isis enable 1

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack0

 ip address 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

 isis enable 1

#

bgp 100

 peer 2.2.2.9 as-number 100

 peer 2.2.2.9 connect-interface LoopBack0

 #

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

peer 2.2.2.9 enable

  peer 2.2.2.9 label-route-capability

#

return

l   Configuration files of the ASBR-PE1

#

 sysname ASBR-PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.9

 mpls

   lsp-trigger all

#

mpls ldp

#

isis 1

 network-entity 10.0000.0000.0002.00

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 isis enable 1

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 20.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 mpls

#

interface LoopBack0

 ip address 2.2.2.9 255.255.255.255

 isis enable 1

#

bgp 100

 peer 20.1.1.2 as-number 200

 peer 1.1.1.9 as-number 100

 peer 1.1.1.9 connect-interface LoopBack0

 #

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  network 1.1.1.9 255.255.255.255

  peer 20.1.1.2 enable

  peer 20.1.1.2 route-policy policy2 export

  peer 20.1.1.2 label-route-capability

  peer 1.1.1.9 enable

  peer 1.1.1.9 route-policy policy1 export

  peer 1.1.1.9 label-route-capability

#

route-policy policy1 permit node 1

 if-match mpls-label

 apply mpls-label

#

route-policy policy2 permit node 1

 apply mpls-label

#

return

l   Configuration files of the ASBR-PE2

#

 sysname ASBR-PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.9

 mpls

   lsp-trigger all

#

mpls ldp

#

isis 1

 network-entity 10.0000.0000.0003.00

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 20.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 mpls

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

 isis enable 1

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack0

 ip address 3.3.3.9 255.255.255.255

 isis enable 1

#

bgp 200

 peer 4.4.4.9 as-number 200

 peer 4.4.4.9 connect-interface LoopBack0

 peer 20.1.1.1 as-number 100

#

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  network 4.4.4.9 255.255.255.255

  peer 4.4.4.9 enable

  peer 4.4.4.9 route-policy policy1 export

  peer 4.4.4.9 label-route-capability

  peer 20.1.1.1 enable

  peer 20.1.1.1 route-policy policy2 export

  peer 20.1.1.1 label-route-capability

#

route-policy policy1 permit node 1

 if-match mpls-label

 apply mpls-label

#

route-policy policy2 permit node 1

 apply mpls-label

#

return

l   Configuration files of the PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.9

 mpls

   lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

  mpls l2vpn default martini

#

mpls ldp

#

 mpls ldp remote-peer 1.1.1.9

 remote-ip 1.1.1.9

#

isis 1

 network-entity 10.0000.0000.0004.00

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

 isis enable 1

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 mpls l2vc 1.1.1.9 100

#

interface LoopBack0

 ip address 4.4.4.9 255.255.255.255

 isis enable 1

#

bgp 200

 peer 3.3.3.9 as-number 200

 peer 3.3.3.9 connect-interface LoopBack0

 #

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  peer 3.3.3.9 enable

  peer 3.3.3.9 label-route-capability

#

return

l   Configuration files of the CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 100.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return

6.11.15 Example for Configuring Inter-AS Multi-Hop Kompella L2VPN

Networking Requirements

As shown in Figure 6-20, the MPLS backbone network uses OSPF as the IGP protocol.

It is required to adopt inter-AS Multi-Hop to realize Kompella L2VPN.

Figure 6-20 Configuring inter-AS Kompella VLL (Option C)

 

Configuration Roadmap

The configuration roadmap is as follows:

1.         Configure IGP for the backbone network.

2.         Enable MPLS on the backbone network and set up dynamic LSP tunnel between the PE and the ASBR-PE.

3.         Set up IBGP between the PE and the ASBR-PE of the same AS and set up the EBGP between the ASBR-PEs.

4.         Configure the routing policy on the ASBR-SE and enable the labeled route function.

5.         Set up the MP-EBGP peer relationship between the PE1 and PE2.

6.         Create the Kompella L2VPN connection between the PE1 and PE2. configure the L2VPN instance on the ASBR.

Data Preparation

To complete the configuration, you need the following data:

l   Data for configuring OSPF

l   MPLS LSR-ID of the PE and the ASBR-PE

l   L2VPN instance name of PE and the ASBR-PE, RD and VPN-Target

l   CE connection name on the PE and the ASBR-PE, CE ID, CE-Range (The default is 10), Default-Offset (1 or 0, the default is 0)

l   Routing policy applied on the ASBR-PE

The interfaces connected the PE and the CE need not be configured with IP addresses because the L2VPN is emulated Layer 2 service.

Configuration Procedure

                               Step 1     Configure IGP on the MPLS backbone.

OSPF is used as the IGP protocol in this example. The configuration procedure is not mentioned here.

Note that the address of Loopback1 must be advertised to the IBGP peer.

After the configuration, run the display ip routing-table command. You can find the ASBR-PE and the PE of the same AS can learn the Loopback1 address from each other.

Take PE1 as an example:

<PE1> display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 7        Routes : 7

 

Destination/Mask  Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface     

 

       1.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

       2.2.2.2/32  OSPF   10   2           D  20.1.1.2        Pos2/0/0

      20.1.1.0/30  Direct 0    0           D  20.1.1.1        Pos2/0/0

      20.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      20.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  20.1.1.2        Pos2/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0          D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0          D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

The ASBR-PE and the PE in the same AS can ping through each other's Loopback1 interface.

                               Step 2     Enable MPLS and set up LDP LSP.

Enable MPLS and set up LDP LSP on the ASBR-PE and the PE in the same AS.

The configuration procedure is not mentioned here.

After the configuration, the LDP neighbor relationship should be established between the PE and the ASBR-PE in the same AS. Running the display mpls ldp session command on the routers, you can find the session state is "Operational" in the command output.

Take PE1 as an example.

[PE1] display mpls ldp session

 

               LDP Session(s) in Public Network

 ---------------------------------------------------------------------

 Peer-ID            Status       LAM  SsnRole  SsnAge      KA-Sent/Rcv

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 2.2.2.2:0          Operational DU   Passive  000:01:03  2/2

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 TOTAL: 1 session(s) Found.

 LAM : Label Advertisement Mode      SsnAge Unit : DDD:HH:MM

                               Step 3     Configure MP-BGP.

Configure MP-IBGP between the PE1 and the ASBR-PE1, between the PE2 and the ASBR-PE2.

Configure MP-EBGP between the ASBR-PE1 and the ASBR-PE2. Note that the Loopback1 routes of the PE in the local AS must be advertised to the peer ASBR-PE.

If the link between the ASBR-PEs is non-P2P, the ASBR-PE must advertise the network segment address between the ASBR-PEs to the peer ASBR-PE.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 2.2.2.2 as-number 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 2.2.2.2 label-route-capability

[PE1-bgp] peer 2.2.2.2 connect-interface LoopBack 1

[PE1-bgp] quit

# Configure ASBR-PE1.

When the routes advertised to the peer ASBR PE are received from a PE of the local AS, MPLS labels are assigned at the time when the routes are advertised.If the routes advertised to a PE of the local AS are IPv4 routes carrying labels, MPLS labels are re-assigned to these routes.

[ASBR-PE1] interface pos 2/0/0

[ASBR-PE1-Pos2/0/0] mpls

[ASBR-PE1-Pos2/0/0] undo shutdown

[ASBR-PE1-Pos2/0/0] quit

[ASBR-PE1] route-policy policy1 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] if-match mpls-label

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] quit

[ASBR-PE1] route-policy policy2 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE1-route-policy] quit

[ASBR-PE1] bgp 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] network 1.1.1.1 32

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.1 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.1 route-policy policy1 export

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.1 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 1.1.1.1 connect-interface loopback 1

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 30.1.1.2 as-number 200

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 30.1.1.2 route-policy policy2 export

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] peer 30.1.1.2 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE1-bgp] quit

# Configure ASBR-PE2.

When the routes advertised to the peer ASBR PE are received from a PE of the local AS, MPLS labels are assigned at the time when the routes are advertised.If the routes advertised to a PE of the local AS are IPv4 routes carrying labels, MPLS labels are re-assigned to these routes.

[ASBR-PE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[ASBR-PE2-Pos1/0/0] mpls

[ASBR-PE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[ASBR-PE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

[ASBR-PE2] route-policy policy1 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] if-match mpls-label

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] quit

[ASBR-PE2] route-policy policy2 permit node 1

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] apply mpls-label

[ASBR-PE2-route-policy] quit

[ASBR-PE2] bgp 200

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] network 4.4.4.4 32

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 30.1.1.1 as-number 100

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 30.1.1.1 route-policy policy2 export

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 30.1.1.1 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.4 as-number 200

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.4 route-policy policy1 export

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.4 label-route-capability

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] peer 4.4.4.4 connect-interface loopback 1

[ASBR-PE2-bgp] quit

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] bgp 200

[PE2-bgp] peer 3.3.3.3 as-number 200

[PE2-bgp] peer 3.3.3.3 label-route-capability

[PE2-bgp] peer 3.3.3.3 connect-interface loopback 1

[PE2-bgp] quit

After the configuration, run the display bgp peer command on the ASBR-PE. You can find the status of the IBGP peer between the PE1 and the ASBR-PE in the same AS is "Established", and the status of the EBGP peer between ASBR-PEs is "Established".

Take ASBR-PE1 as an example.

 [ASBR-PE1] display bgp peer

 

 BGP local router ID : 2.2.2.2

 Local AS number : 100

 Total number of peers : 2                 Peers in established state : 2

 

 Peer           V    AS  MsgRcvd  MsgSent  OutQ  Up/Down       State PrefRcv

 

 1.1.1.1         4   100      111      128     0 00:34:24 Established       0

 30.1.1.2        4   200       75       89     0 00:38:40 Established       1

                               Step 4     Set up the EBGP peer between the PE1 and the PE2.

Enable the BGP peer in the BGP L2VPN address family view to ensure information about the L2VPN can be exchanged.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] bgp 100

[PE1-bgp] peer 4.4.4.4 as-number 200

[PE1-bgp] peer 4.4.4.4 ebgp-max-hop 255

[PE1-bgp] peer 4.4.4.4 connect-interface loopback 1

[PE1-bgp] l2vpn-family

[PE1-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 4.4.4.4 enable

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] bgp 200

[PE2-bgp] peer 1.1.1.1 as-number 100

[PE2-bgp] peer 1.1.1.1 ebgp-max-hop 255

[PE2-bgp] peer 1.1.1.1 connect-interface loopback 1

[PE2-bgp] l2vpn-family

[PE2-bgp-af-l2vpn] peer 1.1.1.1 enable

After the configuration, run the display bgp peer command on the PE1 or the PE2. you can find the EBGP peer status is "Established".

Take PE1 as an example:

[PE1-bgp] display bgp peer

 

 BGP local router ID : 1.1.1.1

 Local AS number : 100

 Total number of peers : 2                 Peers in established state : 2

 

  Peer            V    AS  MsgRcvd  MsgSent  OutQ  Up/Down       State PrefRcv

 

  2.2.2.2         4   100       88       76     0 00:34:24 Established       2

  4.4.4.4         4   200       74       66     0 00: 46:06 Established      0

                               Step 5     Create the Kompella L2VPN connection between the PEs.

Enable MPLS L2VPN on the PEs and configure the L2VPN instance. Create the CE connection. Configure the IP addresses of the same network on the CE1 and CE2 interfaces that access the PEs.

# Configure PE1.

[PE1] mpls l2vpn

[PE1] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 100:1

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] mtu 1500

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce1 id 1 range 10 default-offset 0

[PE1-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] connection ce-offset 2 interface pos1/0/0

# Configure PE2.

[PE2] mpls l2vpn

[PE2] mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] route-distinguisher 200:1

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] mtu 1500

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] vpn-target 1:1

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-vpn1] ce ce1 id 2 range 10 default-offset 0

[PE2-mpls-l2vpn-ce-vpn1-ce1] connection ce-offset 1 interface pos2/0/0

# Configure CE1.

[CE1] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE1-Pos1/0/0] quit

# Configure CE2.

[CE2] interface pos 1/0/0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] undo shutdown

[CE2-Pos1/0/0] quit

                               Step 6     Verify the configuration.

Check information about the L2VPN connection on the PE1. You can view that an L2VC is set up and the VC status is Up.

Take the PE1 as an examples:

[PE1] display mpls l2vpn connection interface pos 1/0/0

conn-type: remote, local vc state: up, remote vc state: up,

     local ce-id: 1, local ce name: ce1, remote ce-id: 2,

     intf(state,encap): Pos1/0/0(up,ppp),

     peer id: 4.4.4.4, route-distinguisher: 200:1,

     local vc label: 21506, remote vc label: 21515,

     tunnel policy: default

     Local C bit is not set, Remote C bit is not set

tunnel type: lsp   , id: 0x1002009

The CE1 and the CE2 should have routes to each other.

Take the CE1 as an examples:

[CE1] display ip routing-table

Route Flags: R - relied, D - download to fib

------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Routing Tables: Public

         Destinations : 5        Routes : 5

 

Destination/Mask   Proto  Pre  Cost     Flags NextHop         Interface     

 

       10.1.1.0/24  Direct 0    0           D  10.1.1.1        Pos1/0/0

       10.1.1.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

       10.1.1.2/32  Direct 0    0           D  10.1.1.2        Pos1/0/0

      127.0.0.0/8   Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

      127.0.0.1/32  Direct 0    0           D  127.0.0.1       InLoopBack0

The CE1 and the CE2 can successfully ping each other.

----End

Configuration Files

l   Configuration files of the CE1

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

#

return

l   Configuration files of the PE1

#

 sysname PE1

#

 mpls lsr-id 1.1.1.1

 mpls

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 20.1.1.1 255.255.255.252

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 100

 peer 4.4.4.4 as-number 200

 peer 4.4.4.4 ebgp-max-hop 255

 peer 4.4.4.4 connect-interface LoopBack1

 peer 2.2.2.2 as-number 100

 peer 2.2.2.2 connect-interface LoopBack1

 #

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  peer 4.4.4.4 enable

  peer 2.2.2.2 enable

  peer 2.2.2.2 label-route-capability

 #

 l2vpn-family

  policy vpn-target

  peer 4.4.4.4 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 1.1.1.1 0.0.0.0

  network 20.1.1.0 0.0.0.3

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

  route-distinguisher 100:1

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce1 id 1 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 2 interface Pos1/0/0

 #

#

return

l   Configuration files of the ASBR-PE1

#

 sysname ASBR1

#

stp region-configuration

 region-name 00e0954d347d

 active region-configuration

#

 mpls lsr-id 2.2.2.2

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 20.1.1.2 255.255.255.252

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.252

 mpls

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 100

 peer 1.1.1.1 as-number 100

 peer 1.1.1.1 connect-interface LoopBack1

 peer 30.1.1.2 as-number 200

#

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  network 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255

  peer 1.1.1.1 enable

  peer 1.1.1.1 route-policy policy1 export

  peer 1.1.1.1 label-route-capability

  peer 30.1.1.2 enable

  peer 30.1.1.2 route-policy policy2 export

  peer 30.1.1.2 label-route-capability

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 2.2.2.2 0.0.0.0

  network 20.1.1.0 0.0.0.3

#

route-policy policy1 permit node 1

 if-match mpls-label

 apply mpls-label

#

 route-policy policy2 permit node 1

 apply mpls-label

#

return

l   Configuration files of the ASBR PE2

#

 sysname ASBR2

#

 mpls lsr-id 3.3.3.3

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 30.1.1.2 255.255.255.252

 mpls

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 40.1.1.1 255.255.255.252

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 3.3.3.3 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 200

 peer 4.4.4.4 as-number 200

 peer 4.4.4.4 connect-interface LoopBack1

 peer 30.1.1.1 as-number 100

#

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  network 4.4.4.4 255.255.255.255

  peer 4.4.4.4 enable

  peer 4.4.4.4 route-policy policy1 export

  peer 4.4.4.4 label-route-capability

  peer 30.1.1.1 enable

  peer 30.1.1.1 route-policy policy2 export

  peer 30.1.1.1 label-route-capability

#

 l2vpn-family

  policy vpn-target

  peer 4.4.4.4 enable

 

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 3.3.3.3 0.0.0.0

  network 40.1.1.0 0.0.0.3

#

route-policy policy1 permit node 1

 if-match mpls-label

 apply mpls-label

#

route-policy policy2 permit node 1

 apply mpls-label

#

return

l   Configuration files of the PE2

#

 sysname PE2

#

 mpls lsr-id 4.4.4.4

 mpls

  lsp-trigger all

 mpls l2vpn

#

mpls ldp

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 40.1.1.2 255.255.255.252

 mpls

 mpls ldp

#

interface Pos2/0/0

 undo shutdown

#

interface LoopBack1

 ip address 4.4.4.4 255.255.255.255

#

bgp 200

 peer 1.1.1.1 as-number 100

 peer 1.1.1.1 ebgp-max-hop 255

 peer 1.1.1.1 connect-interface LoopBack1

 peer 3.3.3.3 as-number 200

 peer 3.3.3.3 connect-interface LoopBack1

 #

 ipv4-family unicast

  undo synchronization

  peer 1.1.1.1 enable

  peer 3.3.3.3 enable

  peer 3.3.3.3 label-route-capability

 #

 l2vpn-family

  policy vpn-target

  peer 1.1.1.1 enable

#

ospf 1

 area 0.0.0.0

  network 40.1.1.0 0.0.0.3

  network 4.4.4.4 0.0.0.0

#

 mpls l2vpn vpn1 encapsulation ppp

  route-distinguisher 200:1

  vpn-target 1:1 import-extcommunity

  vpn-target 1:1 export-extcommunity

  ce ce2 id 2 range 10 default-offset 0

   connection ce-offset 1 interface Pos2/0/0

 #

#

return

l   Configuration files of the CE2

#

 sysname CE2

#

interface Pos1/0/0

 undo shutdown

 ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.0

#

return